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International Space Station

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BUSINESS
August 2, 1999 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the space shuttle Discovery lifts off for the International Space Station in February, that rumble you hear may not be the engines. It may be the sound of hundreds of nervous stomachs at L-3 Communications Systems-East in Camden. For L-3 workers, the countdown to mission STS-92 has been going on for the last 12 years. Riding on that shuttle will be the first seven of 30 pieces of high-tech equipment assembled by L-3. They will provide a vital communications link between the space station and Earth.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The International Space Station is so big and complicated it will have to be launched in 43 parts and then put together like a giant set of Tinker Toys. Astronauts will ride the space shuttle to the 220-mile-high construction site, where, working outside in temperatures that can plunge to minus 170 degrees Fahrenheit, they will assemble the various power modules, laboratory spaces and living quarters. The space station is the most expensive and ambitious planned project since the moon landing.
NEWS
July 16, 2006
The space shuttle Discovery is scheduled to return from its mission to the International Space Station tomorrow. Some argue that manned space missions risk too much in human lives and expensive hardware. Do you think America should abandon manned space flight? Should the money saved be spent on robotic space missions, other scientific programs, or other issues facing the nation? Send your thoughts by Wednesday in 200 words or less to Readers Editor, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia 19101; Fax: 215-854-4483.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Now that NASA has mothballed its fleet of space shuttles, the space agency needs a new ride to the International Space Station. On Friday, NASA handed out $1.1 billion in contracts to three companies to privately develop rockets and spacecraft for what could be the next step in manned spaceflight. The announcement was made by NASA Administrator Charles Bolden on a cloudless day from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The winners included Hawthorne, Calif.-based rocket maker Space Exploration Technologies Corp., or SpaceX, and Boeing Co., which develops spacecraft in Huntington Beach, Calif., and uses rocket engines made by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | Inquirer Staff
Canadian astronaut Cmdr. Chris Hadfield has tweeted another fun photo from space showing Pennsylvania, New Jersey and neighboring states from a heavenly perspective. "Chesapeake to Cape Cod to Lake Huron - in a glance, so much history, geology and geography," @Cmdr_Hadfield posted on Twitter. In the shot from the International Space Station, the white sands of the Jersey Shore's barrier islands are clearly visible and the Delaware River seems to disappear as it narrows north of Trenton.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By Jim Heintz, Associated Press
MOSCOW - A Soyuz spacecraft carrying a Russian, an American, and a Dutchman to the International Space Station blasted off flawlessly from Russia's launch facility in Kazakhstan on Wednesday. Mission commander Oleg Kononenko and his colleagues, American Don Pettit and European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, are to dock with the space station on Friday. The blastoff from the snowy launchpad in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, took place without a hitch and the spacecraft reached Earth orbit about nine minutes later.
NEWS
February 9, 2012
Janice Voss, 55, a NASA astronaut who first worked for the space agency as a teenager and flew five shuttle missions in seven years, died Tuesday after a battle with cancer. A native of South Bend, Ind., Dr. Voss started with NASA while attending Purdue University in 1973. She later worked as an instructor before being selected as an astronaut in 1990. She received a doctorate in aeronautics/astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Voss flew four missions in the 1990s before a flight to the International Space Station in 2000.
NEWS
August 21, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
After more than five months in orbit, three astronauts from the International Space Station were headed home yesterday as the space shuttle Discovery undocked, flew a loop around the outpost, then backed slowly away and disappeared into a field of stars. "It's time to say goodbye, station, and good luck, new crew," said Russian Yury Usachev, the outgoing station commander, before the hatches closed between station and shuttle. Discovery and its crew of four ferried a new crew to the station following its Aug. 10 liftoff.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010
YOU HAVE these choices in the DVD planet this week: "Toy Story 3," "Toy Story 3," or "Toy Story 3. " The Disney-Pixar smash finds Woody trying to rescue his pals from a prisonlike day care center, and arrives in several configurations this week, including a basic DVD copy that includes featurettes about the vocal talent, the new (and old) toy characters, and an informational piece about the international space station (hosted by Buzz Lightyear). The theatrical release is now the highest grossing animated movie ever, and it may play even better on DVD. The movie was shown in 3-D in theaters, where the version I saw had problems.
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NEWS
June 1, 2015
Seveneves By Neal Stephenson William Morrow. 880 pp. $35 Reviewed by Scott F. Andrews Neal Stephenson's palindromic Seveneves demands your attention from the first sentence: "The moon blew up without warning and for no apparent reason. " This opening may sound absurd, but readers can count on Stephenson to deliver credible science and satisfying narrative. Not that Stephenson has anything left to prove. He's won just about every major award the science-fiction community offers.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The astronaut Scott Kelly is about to take off for the International Space Station, and if he is like some space travelers, he may temporarily feel a bit foggy or disoriented once in orbit. Scientists have not had much luck measuring this subtle effect with standard cognitive tests, but now, a group of University of Pennsylvania researchers is trying a new tack. While Kelly is in space, they will compare his mental performance with that of a uniquely qualified individual who stays behind on Earth.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Light, or more precisely the lack of it, is literally one of the most depressing things about winter. In fact, each year, winter's gloom makes 1 percent to 5 percent of us so miserable we'd qualify for a diagnosis of major depression. Up to a quarter more of us just feel sluggish, sleepy, and unusually attracted to carbs. Normalcy returns with May's flowers. George Brainard's fascination with this phenomenon, known as Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, has taken him from Earth to space and back again.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Gone are the inspiring images of heroic astronauts marching toward the gantry, helmets cradled in their arms and smiles on their faces. The latest portrayals of American space travel suggest it has devolved into an odd combination of futuristic trucking firms and pricey amusement park rides. Two commercial spacecraft accidents last month raised serious concerns about private-sector space travel as well as the federal government's broader space policy. Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo disintegrated above California's Mojave Desert on Oct. 31, killing one pilot and injuring another, just days after the liftoff explosion of Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Antares rocket on Wallops Island, Va. Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration, National Transportation Safety Board, and NASA are investigating the accidents.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Two astronauts will make a hastily planned space walk Saturday to try to fix an ammonia leak in the power system of the International Space Station. The leak in a cooling system was discovered Thursday when "snowflakes" of ammonia were seen flying away from the station. Engineers on Earth were up overnight plotting an impromptu space walk. Space walks are rarely done on such short notice, but the space agency wanted to check out the leak before all the ammonia escaped and also to take advantage of a spacewalking crew member who is about to return home.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | Inquirer Staff
Canadian astronaut Cmdr. Chris Hadfield has tweeted another fun photo from space showing Pennsylvania, New Jersey and neighboring states from a heavenly perspective. "Chesapeake to Cape Cod to Lake Huron - in a glance, so much history, geology and geography," @Cmdr_Hadfield posted on Twitter. In the shot from the International Space Station, the white sands of the Jersey Shore's barrier islands are clearly visible and the Delaware River seems to disappear as it narrows north of Trenton.
NEWS
May 1, 2013
Gay marriage at hand in R.I. PROVIDENCE, R.I. - Rhode Island appears poised to become the nation's 10th state to allow gay and lesbian couples to marry after a legislative panel voted Tuesday to forward same-sex marriage legislation to the full House for a final - and largely procedural - vote. The outcome of Thursday's House vote is not in doubt, as the House overwhelmingly passed an earlier version of the bill in January. Gov. Lincoln Chafee is expected to sign the bill into law. - AP Nuke shutdown proving costly LOS ANGELES - Costs tied to the idling of California's San Onofre nuclear power plant have climbed to $553 million, while the majority owner raised the possibility Tuesday of retiring the plant if it can't get one reactor running later this year.
NEWS
March 30, 2013
Iraq insurgents' bombs kill 23 BAGHDAD - A string of bombings targeting Shiite mosques in Iraq killed at least 23 people and wounded dozens Friday, officials said. The attacks were the latest in spectacular assaults staged by insurgents seeking to undermine the Shiite-led government's efforts to achieve security across the country. There was no immediate claim of responsibility, but the bombings bore the hallmarks of al-Qaeda's Iraq branch. Friday is a particularly popular day for militants to undertake such attacks because of the rush of mostly men and boys to the mosques throughout the country to hear Muslim sermons and take part in communal prayers.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A commercial craft carrying a ton of supplies for the International Space Station ran into thruster trouble shortly after liftoff Friday. Flight controllers managed to gain control, but were forced to delay its arrival at the orbiting lab. The earliest the Dragon capsule could show up is Sunday, a day late, said top officials for NASA and the private company SpaceX. "We're definitely not going to rush it," said SpaceX's billionaire founder, Elon Musk. "We want to make sure first and foremost that things are safe before proceeding.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - NASA, the agency that epitomized the Right Stuff, looks lost in space and doesn't have a clear sense of where it is going, an independent panel of science and engineering experts said in a stinging report Wednesday. The report by a panel of the National Academy of Sciences doesn't blame NASA; it faults the president, Congress, and the nation for not giving better direction. It also said NASA was doing little to further a White House goal of sending astronauts to an asteroid.
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