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SPORTS
September 25, 2001 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Early last year, police investigating a people-smuggling operation in New Zealand made a startling discovery in the home shared by three suspects - a map of Sydney, Australia, with a small nuclear reactor in the city's western suburbs highlighted. Sydney, of course, was where the Olympic Games were to be held a few months later. The three men, all from Afghanistan, were arrested. A fourth was arrested in August, a month before the Games. All four are still in New Zealand, free on bond and awaiting trial.
SPORTS
November 14, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
World Boxing Council middleweight champion Keith Holmes yesterday sued promoter Don King for breach of contract, seeking unspecified damages and termination of their contract. In papers filed in the U.S. District Court in Wilmington, Del., Holmes, 28, of Bowie, Md., said his amended March 1997 contract called for King Productions to promote three bouts a year. King met the provision for the first two years, but failed to do so for the third year that ended May 27, court papers said.
NEWS
October 6, 2012
Barbara Ann Scott, who became a Canadian heroine at age 19 when she won figure-skating gold at the 1948 Winter Olympics, succeeding Norway's Sonja Henie as the premier women's skater in a sport Europeans had dominated for decades, died Sunday at her home on Amelia Island, Fla. Growing up in Ottawa, Ms. Scott idolized Henie, the champion at the last three Olympics before World War II. Emerging as a champion in her own right at the Games in St....
SPORTS
March 28, 1991 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
South Africa yesterday moved to the threshold of rejoining the Olympic community, raising the real prospect that the country's three decades of isolation from international sports could soon come to an end. Representatives of the International Olympic Committee granted conditional recognition to a South African Olympic committee, meaning the country might be allowed to participate in the 1992 Summer Games in Barcelona. The move fell short of outright recognition, which the South Africans had hoped for and which had seemed a possibility during the Olympic commission's visit.
SPORTS
May 5, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The International Olympic Committee's medical chief yesterday accused rogue laboratories of helping athletes escape the drug-testing net. These laboratories allegedly have supervised drug-taking programs and warned athletes off competitions if traces of banned substances are likely to show up in tests. Prince Alexandre de Merode, Belgian chairman of the IOC Medical Commission, has circulated a code of ethics to the IOC's accredited laboratories, but he says this does nothing to prevent others from flouting the system.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | By Bob Ford INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The favorite took the gold medal yesterday in one of the most fiercely contested competitions in international sports - the right to host the Olympic Games. Beijing was awarded the 2008 Summer Games by the International Olympic Committee yesterday, claiming the prize with an easy second-ballot victory that will send the international sports tournament to the world's most populous nation for the first time. The members of the IOC, a majority of whom selected Beijing by secret ballot from among five finalist cities, overlooked a history of human-rights abuses that some observers felt should have disqualified the Chinese capital from consideration.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The International Olympic Committee yesterday ended its 21-year boycott of South Africa, opening the way for the country to compete in next summer's games in Barcelona, Spain. South Africa has not fielded an Olympic team since it sent an all-white squad to the 1960 summer games in Rome. Complaints from other African nations led the Olympics to bar South Africa from competing in 1964 or 1968, and the country was formally expelled from the Olympic movement in 1970. Although the expected lifting of U.S. economic sanctions against South Africa later this week has naturally drawn a great deal of interest here, it has been nothing compared to the emotions and expectations raised by the prospect of a return to international sports.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2008 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
It's still cold. And sometimes a little damp. And even if we haven't gotten those multi-feet snowstorms this year, the cold is still hanging on. Who wouldn't want to curl up next to a warm, roaring fire? If you don't have a fireplace of your own - or just don't want to deal with chopping and dragging wood - take a break at one of the region's many bars, restaurants and coffee spots where the best view is of the hearth. Three Beans Coffee Co. 140 N. Haddon Ave., Haddonfield, 856-354-4751 This coffeehouse is like a home away from home.
SPORTS
June 18, 1991 | The Inquirer Staff
South Africa moved closer to becoming eligible for world sports competition yesterday by abolishing its last major apartheid law. It was the last of three major apartheid laws whose repeal had been demanded before South Africa could re-enter international sports after a 20- year ban. The South African Parliament voted overwhelmingly to repeal the Population Registration Act of 1950, which classified citizens on the basis of race and served...
SPORTS
August 25, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
It turned out that Lance Armstrong, having willed himself over so many obstacles for so many years, couldn't surmount the very last hill. Getting past the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's investigation into a pattern of systematic cheating during Armstrong's cycling career was all that stood between the seven-time Tour de France champion and a clean sweep of his rivals both on the bike and off it. Armstrong beat the hundreds of drug tests during his...
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NEWS
October 6, 2012
Barbara Ann Scott, who became a Canadian heroine at age 19 when she won figure-skating gold at the 1948 Winter Olympics, succeeding Norway's Sonja Henie as the premier women's skater in a sport Europeans had dominated for decades, died Sunday at her home on Amelia Island, Fla. Growing up in Ottawa, Ms. Scott idolized Henie, the champion at the last three Olympics before World War II. Emerging as a champion in her own right at the Games in St....
SPORTS
August 25, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
It turned out that Lance Armstrong, having willed himself over so many obstacles for so many years, couldn't surmount the very last hill. Getting past the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's investigation into a pattern of systematic cheating during Armstrong's cycling career was all that stood between the seven-time Tour de France champion and a clean sweep of his rivals both on the bike and off it. Armstrong beat the hundreds of drug tests during his...
SPORTS
July 18, 2012 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
WASHINGTON — OK, so the back-and-forth among Kobe Bryant, Michael Jordan and Charles Barkley about whether the 2012 USA men's Olympic team could have defeated the original, one-and-only "Dream Team" was fun. For what it's worth, I think the 1992 team was better, but not by as big a margin as Jordan, Barkley and now even President Obama have suggested. In a seven-game-series, I think the Dream Team wins, 4-3. But one factor that no one can dispute is that the competition the United States will face starting in London is far superior to anything the 1992 squad faced in Barcelona.
SPORTS
September 30, 2010 | By LES BOWEN, bowenl@phillynews.com
Lots of pro sports teams do charity work, which is why it's significant that the Eagles are one of only three organizations in the world short-listed for the Sports Team of the Year Award from Beyond Sport, a global group that operates in 115 countries. The Eagles will find out today, at the Beyond Sport Conference in Chicago, whether they won. The other finalists are two soccer teams, Manchester United and Hapoel Tel Aviv FC. The Birds are there because of the Eagles Youth Partnership, the charity arm they set up 15 years ago. Eagles president Joe Banner said that when Jeffrey Lurie bought the team, the top people involved in management "all came from a background of having done a lot of charity work," and they didn't want to do what many teams do, be content with establishing a foundation that funnels money to existing projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2008 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
It's still cold. And sometimes a little damp. And even if we haven't gotten those multi-feet snowstorms this year, the cold is still hanging on. Who wouldn't want to curl up next to a warm, roaring fire? If you don't have a fireplace of your own - or just don't want to deal with chopping and dragging wood - take a break at one of the region's many bars, restaurants and coffee spots where the best view is of the hearth. Three Beans Coffee Co. 140 N. Haddon Ave., Haddonfield, 856-354-4751 This coffeehouse is like a home away from home.
SPORTS
September 25, 2001 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Early last year, police investigating a people-smuggling operation in New Zealand made a startling discovery in the home shared by three suspects - a map of Sydney, Australia, with a small nuclear reactor in the city's western suburbs highlighted. Sydney, of course, was where the Olympic Games were to be held a few months later. The three men, all from Afghanistan, were arrested. A fourth was arrested in August, a month before the Games. All four are still in New Zealand, free on bond and awaiting trial.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | By Bob Ford INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The favorite took the gold medal yesterday in one of the most fiercely contested competitions in international sports - the right to host the Olympic Games. Beijing was awarded the 2008 Summer Games by the International Olympic Committee yesterday, claiming the prize with an easy second-ballot victory that will send the international sports tournament to the world's most populous nation for the first time. The members of the IOC, a majority of whom selected Beijing by secret ballot from among five finalist cities, overlooked a history of human-rights abuses that some observers felt should have disqualified the Chinese capital from consideration.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | By Jennifer Weiner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are TV characters we love. There are TV characters we loathe. And every once in a while, television will deliver the perfect mixture of the two - the star we can't stand, but, somehow, can't stop watching. Joan Collins pulled it off as Alexis Carrington in Dynasty. Heather Locklear did it as Amanda Woodward in Melrose Place. David Clennon has done it twice as Miles Drentell, the suit from hell, in thirtysomething and Once and Again. Richard Hatch, the winner of Survivor's million-dollar purse last season on CBS, was another example of the star we love to hate.
SPORTS
November 14, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
World Boxing Council middleweight champion Keith Holmes yesterday sued promoter Don King for breach of contract, seeking unspecified damages and termination of their contract. In papers filed in the U.S. District Court in Wilmington, Del., Holmes, 28, of Bowie, Md., said his amended March 1997 contract called for King Productions to promote three bouts a year. King met the provision for the first two years, but failed to do so for the third year that ended May 27, court papers said.
SPORTS
July 9, 1993 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This western New York city has been ridiculed for its vile weather, blue- collar image and a pro football team that has lost the last three Super Bowls with increasing degrees of humiliation. Now it has the World University Games - a 10-day, 12-sport competition that officially opened last night with 3 1/2 hours of pomp and pageantry before a crowd of at least 60,000 at Rich Stadium. In its first appearance on U.S. soil, the University Games will showcase more than 5,000 athletes from 135 nations.
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