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International Students

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NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Emily Brill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jenny Guo flexes her hands and slides onto a piano bench. Seated before the instrument she has played since age 6, the 19-year-old Camden Catholic High School senior feels at home. This is good, considering she is nearly 7,500 miles from Shanghai, China, the city she has called home since birth. Guo currently lives and studies at Camden Catholic as part of the school's new international-student boarding program. She lives with 18 Chinese and Korean students in Nazareth House, a three-story building next to Camden Catholic once used for student or staff retreats.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1984, faced with the prospect of mandatory service in her country's armed forces, Chanty Jong decided to leave Cambodia. So one night, she and 23 others walked across the border from Cambodia into Thailand. But a crying baby tipped off border guards, who began shooting at the escapees, driving them into a minefield. Fourteen were killed. "Some of them got shot by the soldiers, and some of them got killed by the mines," said Jong, now 26, her voice calm as she retells the story.
NEWS
November 13, 2005 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It was just before 5 p.m. as students - many with families and younger siblings in tow - began trickling into the lobby of the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg Center on Walnut Street. Waiting to greet them were student volunteers wearing badges that read "International Student Orientation. " A cappella chorus music - the tasteful soundtrack of the Ivy League - was playing in the background, and finger food was arrayed on three tables decorated with Penn's red and blue. Surveying the scene as they clutched drinks were Robert and Dorothy Lai. The head of an investment firm in Singapore, Robert Lai said his daughter Michelle had badly wanted to go to school in the United States.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University will offer certain applicants this year the option of submitting an additional essay in lieu of SAT or ACT scores, joining a slew of schools that have eliminated or reduced standardized-test requirements for admission. The South Jersey university tested a "test-optional" program for performing-arts applicants last year. The success of that program has led to wider implementation: Students with 3.5 grade-point averages on a 4.0 high school scale will be eligible. A broad swath of students must still submit SAT or ACT scores, including applicants to the engineering school, applicants qualifying for the state Educational Opportunity Fund, home-schooled students, international students, and candidates for academic merit scholarships.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brian Kors is midway through a double history period at Center City's Friends Select School, writing vocabulary words on the whiteboard as afternoon sun streams through the back window. "Infrastructure," he says, turning toward a room full of 16- and 17-year-olds. "That's a good SAT word. Can anyone define it for us?" A girl near the front of the room raises her hand hesitantly. "Can I do it in Chinese?" she asks. The class bursts into laughter. At Friends Select, though, there's a good chance at least half the class would understand her if she did. The tiny Quaker school on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway has a robust international population - about 5 percent of students come from overseas - and officials there have been making a concerted effort to expose students to international cultures for some time.
NEWS
July 23, 2009 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
A North Philadelphia community is divided over a planned four-story apartment building for about 200 Temple University international students. Some residents have praised the project, slated for Cecil B. Moore Avenue, between Sydenham and 16th streets. The Rev. Lewis Nash, of Faith Deliverance Church, said he supports the project because it will reduce blight and create both construction jobs and permanent ones once the 106-unit building opens. But others, both community residents and developers of smaller-scaleĀ  housing, are crying foul.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
By Jun-Youb "JY" Lee When I heard Vice President Biden proclaim to University of Pennsylvania graduates Monday, "China is going to eat our lunch," I wondered if he understood his audience. Onstage with him were Amy Gutmann, Penn's president, and Princeton professor Kwame Appiah, one of Biden's fellow honorary doctorate recipients. Both are leading thinkers on cosmopolitanism and multiculturalism. What did they think of Biden's patriotic call to serve American interests above all other nations'?
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Getrude Makurumidze has a soft laugh that kicks in whenever the college freshman, 18, marvels at all the things she has done and seen in the few weeks since she walked off a plane from her native Zimbabwe - her first taste of Thai food, her first swimming lesson, her first Downward Facing Dog in yoga class. The laugh and broad smile are part of her sunny nature that breaks through, jarringly at times, when she talks about everything she has had to overcome to get from the African mining town of Zwekwe to the campus of Bryn Mawr College: losing her mother, a newborn sister, and her father within the span of a few months when she was 8 years old, all, she eventually learned, from AIDS; losing money for her education in an economic downturn that devastated Zimbabwe; frequent moves around the poverty-stricken nation, and the slow drip of revelations about how she became an AIDS orphan.
NEWS
February 8, 2005
An international flavor to community colleges I would like to offer another view to Patrick Kerkstra's Jan. 23 article "Losing Our Edge," which cites a decrease in international enrollment at American colleges and universities. His article fails to recognize the enrollment of international students at community colleges. Montgomery County Community College has consistently been gaining an edge when it comes to international student enrollment. The college's international students have increased more than 50 percent in the last five years.
NEWS
May 14, 2002 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jitters about a sodden job market mixed with talk about Sept. 11's impact on the academic world as the University of Pennsylvania's Class of 2002 - a group whose senior year has been marked by the tumult of history - collected diplomas yesterday. Penn president Judith Rodin used the university's 246th commencement to launch a strongly worded broadside against recent efforts by the Bush administration and Congress to curtail the ability of foreign students to study certain subjects in the United States.
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NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Ebola concerns mount, many campuses across the region are suspending university-sponsored travel to affected countries, training health center employees to deal with an outbreak, and monitoring the health of students arriving from regions hit by the illness. "Even if the probability of an Ebola outbreak in this country remains remote, it is critically important that we take proactive measures to be fully prepared," Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania, wrote in an e-mail to the Penn community last week, outlining steps the Philadelphia university is taking.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University will offer certain applicants this year the option of submitting an additional essay in lieu of SAT or ACT scores, joining a slew of schools that have eliminated or reduced standardized-test requirements for admission. The South Jersey university tested a "test-optional" program for performing-arts applicants last year. The success of that program has led to wider implementation: Students with 3.5 grade-point averages on a 4.0 high school scale will be eligible. A broad swath of students must still submit SAT or ACT scores, including applicants to the engineering school, applicants qualifying for the state Educational Opportunity Fund, home-schooled students, international students, and candidates for academic merit scholarships.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania State University and the University of Pennsylvania are leading the local effort to attract international students, according to a report published Monday. The number of foreign students in the United States reached an all-time high of 819,644 in 2011-12, up 7.2 percent from the year before and continuing seven consecutive years of growth, according to the Institute of International Education's annual "Open Doors" report. Those students represent a relatively small percentage of the total U.S. student population, roughly 4 percent.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mi casa, su casa . An exchange program for Spanish teenagers is looking for families in Camden County who would like to host students for the month of July. Fifteen students and a chaperone are coming from July 1 to 29, and eight students have been placed in host homes. "They're sharing their culture and you're sharing the American way of life," said Dan Herman, a coordinator for the Greater Cherry Hill area for Global Friendships, a homestay program for international students who travel abroad.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
It took one road trip for Demola Onifade to astound his new basketball teammates and coaches. But it was nothing that the 16-year-old from Lagos, Nigeria, did on the court. "We're together as a team, back at the hotel," said Rob DePersia, a local attorney who is the coach of Team Speed, an AAU squad that features top teenage players from South Jersey. "Demola said, 'I have to go and study.' He went and did his homework twice. "He has that inner drive. That's why he's going to be great.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
By Jun-Youb "JY" Lee When I heard Vice President Biden proclaim to University of Pennsylvania graduates Monday, "China is going to eat our lunch," I wondered if he understood his audience. Onstage with him were Amy Gutmann, Penn's president, and Princeton professor Kwame Appiah, one of Biden's fellow honorary doctorate recipients. Both are leading thinkers on cosmopolitanism and multiculturalism. What did they think of Biden's patriotic call to serve American interests above all other nations'?
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County College will increase its tuition and fees slightly next school year and make budget cuts of about $1.8 million as its operating budget shrinks because of ever-rising costs and flat government funding. The school's board of trustees approved the budget at its meeting Tuesday night. The tuition and fee increases were adopted in March. Total cost per credit at Camden County College will increase $5 next year to $138 for in-county students, $142 for out-of-county students, and $217 for international students.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swarthmore College will use part of a $20 million gift it received Saturday to provide financial aid to a cadre of "global scholars" from the United States and other countries. The $8 million, which will create the Global Scholars Program, will support students who have both financial need and an interest in global leadership, president Rebecca Chopp said. "Financial aid is a core value for us, and we want to become more of an international school," said Giles "Gil" Kemp, a 1972 alumnus, who along with his wife, Barbara Guss Kemp, made the gift.
NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Swarthmore College will use part of a $20 million gift it received on Saturday to provide financial aid to a cadre of "global scholars" from both the United States and other countries. The $8 million, which will create the "Global Scholars Program," will support students who have both financial need and an interest in global leadership, President Rebecca Chopp said. "Financial aid is a core value for us, and we want to become more of an international school," said Giles "Gil" Kemp, a 1972 alumnus, who along with his wife, Barbara Guss Kemp, made the gift.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a high school exchange student from Germany, Felix Weigel went to Lewistown, which is near Pennsylvania State University. When it came time to pick a college, Penn State topped his list. Rishi Muktidoot, who was born in India and grew up in Saudi Arabia, heard about Penn State from his older sister, who went there before him. Xin Yue Yang of China wanted to be near the New York City she had seen featured alluringly in movies. Her best friend chose Penn State. She did, too. The students are part of a growing international population at the state flagship school's main campus.
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