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International Students

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NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Emily Brill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jenny Guo flexes her hands and slides onto a piano bench. Seated before the instrument she has played since age 6, the 19-year-old Camden Catholic High School senior feels at home. This is good, considering she is nearly 7,500 miles from Shanghai, China, the city she has called home since birth. Guo currently lives and studies at Camden Catholic as part of the school's new international-student boarding program. She lives with 18 Chinese and Korean students in Nazareth House, a three-story building next to Camden Catholic once used for student or staff retreats.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1984, faced with the prospect of mandatory service in her country's armed forces, Chanty Jong decided to leave Cambodia. So one night, she and 23 others walked across the border from Cambodia into Thailand. But a crying baby tipped off border guards, who began shooting at the escapees, driving them into a minefield. Fourteen were killed. "Some of them got shot by the soldiers, and some of them got killed by the mines," said Jong, now 26, her voice calm as she retells the story.
NEWS
November 13, 2005 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It was just before 5 p.m. as students - many with families and younger siblings in tow - began trickling into the lobby of the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg Center on Walnut Street. Waiting to greet them were student volunteers wearing badges that read "International Student Orientation. " A cappella chorus music - the tasteful soundtrack of the Ivy League - was playing in the background, and finger food was arrayed on three tables decorated with Penn's red and blue. Surveying the scene as they clutched drinks were Robert and Dorothy Lai. The head of an investment firm in Singapore, Robert Lai said his daughter Michelle had badly wanted to go to school in the United States.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Community College of Philadelphia plans a pair of new residential towers beside its Spring Garden Street campus to accommodate a hoped-for influx of high-achieving - and higher-paying - international students. The two-year public college has selected Wayne-based Radnor Property Group to develop the roughly 500-unit, 11-story complex at 15th and Hamilton Streets, with plans for a mix of student and nonstudent housing. CCP joins a small but growing list of community colleges nationwide that are looking abroad for an antidote to sinking enrollments.
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University on Tuesday announced the sudden departure of its provost, Hai-Lung Dai, saying he "has been relieved of his administrative responsibilities effective immediately. " The announcement came on the same day that the university acknowledged that it had exceeded its financial aid budget for its merit scholarship program for 2016-17 by $22 million and had already taken steps to balance the budget. Several sources with ties to the university said that president Neil D. Theobald was unhappy with the shortfall and that a rift had developed between him and Dai, who had been provost for four years.
NEWS
July 7, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Dorms at a community college? Community College of Philadelphia's plans to build two dorm buildings is puzzling and troubling ("Big welcome mat," June 8). President Donald Generals said the goal is to attract international students who will pay higher tuition than local students. An important role of community colleges is to give local students opportunities to take college-level, career-oriented courses when a four-year college is beyond their financial means.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brian Kors is midway through a double history period at Center City's Friends Select School, writing vocabulary words on the whiteboard as afternoon sun streams through the back window. "Infrastructure," he says, turning toward a room full of 16- and 17-year-olds. "That's a good SAT word. Can anyone define it for us?" A girl near the front of the room raises her hand hesitantly. "Can I do it in Chinese?" she asks. The class bursts into laughter. At Friends Select, though, there's a good chance at least half the class would understand her if she did. The tiny Quaker school on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway has a robust international population - about 5 percent of students come from overseas - and officials there have been making a concerted effort to expose students to international cultures for some time.
NEWS
February 8, 2005
An international flavor to community colleges I would like to offer another view to Patrick Kerkstra's Jan. 23 article "Losing Our Edge," which cites a decrease in international enrollment at American colleges and universities. His article fails to recognize the enrollment of international students at community colleges. Montgomery County Community College has consistently been gaining an edge when it comes to international student enrollment. The college's international students have increased more than 50 percent in the last five years.
NEWS
May 14, 2002 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jitters about a sodden job market mixed with talk about Sept. 11's impact on the academic world as the University of Pennsylvania's Class of 2002 - a group whose senior year has been marked by the tumult of history - collected diplomas yesterday. Penn president Judith Rodin used the university's 246th commencement to launch a strongly worded broadside against recent efforts by the Bush administration and Congress to curtail the ability of foreign students to study certain subjects in the United States.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania State University and the University of Pennsylvania are leading the local effort to attract international students, according to a report published Monday. The number of foreign students in the United States reached an all-time high of 819,644 in 2011-12, up 7.2 percent from the year before and continuing seven consecutive years of growth, according to the Institute of International Education's annual "Open Doors" report. Those students represent a relatively small percentage of the total U.S. student population, roughly 4 percent.
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NEWS
July 7, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Dorms at a community college? Community College of Philadelphia's plans to build two dorm buildings is puzzling and troubling ("Big welcome mat," June 8). President Donald Generals said the goal is to attract international students who will pay higher tuition than local students. An important role of community colleges is to give local students opportunities to take college-level, career-oriented courses when a four-year college is beyond their financial means.
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University on Tuesday announced the sudden departure of its provost, Hai-Lung Dai, saying he "has been relieved of his administrative responsibilities effective immediately. " The announcement came on the same day that the university acknowledged that it had exceeded its financial aid budget for its merit scholarship program for 2016-17 by $22 million and had already taken steps to balance the budget. Several sources with ties to the university said that president Neil D. Theobald was unhappy with the shortfall and that a rift had developed between him and Dai, who had been provost for four years.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Community College of Philadelphia plans a pair of new residential towers beside its Spring Garden Street campus to accommodate a hoped-for influx of high-achieving - and higher-paying - international students. The two-year public college has selected Wayne-based Radnor Property Group to develop the roughly 500-unit, 11-story complex at 15th and Hamilton Streets, with plans for a mix of student and nonstudent housing. CCP joins a small but growing list of community colleges nationwide that are looking abroad for an antidote to sinking enrollments.
NEWS
March 14, 2016
There were 73,019 international secondary students in the U.S. in 2013, 95 percent of whom were in private schools, either independent or parochial. Where They Come From Rank   Country   Students*   Pct. of Total    1.   China   23,562   32.3     2.   S. Korea   8,777   12.0     3.   Germany   7,130   9.8     4.   Mexico   2,659   3.6     5.   Brazil   2,292   3.1     6.   Vietnam   2,289   3.1     7.   Spain   2,125   2.9     8.   Japan   1,959   2.7     9.   Thailand   1,827   2.5     10.   Italy   1,718   2.4     Where They Go in the United States Rank   State   Students**   Pct.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Aiming to draw more students and stay competitive in the Philadelphia area, Pennsylvania State University is poised to spend more than $100 million to add a residence hall at its Abington campus, and a residence hall and student union at its Brandywine campus in Media. Neither campus has residence halls, so the addition of housing has the potential to transform what have been satellite sites serving commuters into self-enclosed communities that could appeal to a wider swath of prospective students.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
The college transition brings with it the stress of packing, making friends, and getting adjusted to a new learning environment. For international students, coming to a new country also involves an additional anxiety: fitting in. For the first time, the Haddonfield School District is working to ease that transition for some high-achieving students from China, Superintendent Richard Perry said. In September, Haddonfield Memorial High School plans to enroll four students - one junior and three seniors - from southern China's Guangdong Country Garden School for stays of 10 to 12 months.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Ebola concerns mount, many campuses across the region are suspending university-sponsored travel to affected countries, training health center employees to deal with an outbreak, and monitoring the health of students arriving from regions hit by the illness. "Even if the probability of an Ebola outbreak in this country remains remote, it is critically important that we take proactive measures to be fully prepared," Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania, wrote in an e-mail to the Penn community last week, outlining steps the Philadelphia university is taking.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University will offer certain applicants this year the option of submitting an additional essay in lieu of SAT or ACT scores, joining a slew of schools that have eliminated or reduced standardized-test requirements for admission. The South Jersey university tested a "test-optional" program for performing-arts applicants last year. The success of that program has led to wider implementation: Students with 3.5 grade-point averages on a 4.0 high school scale will be eligible. A broad swath of students must still submit SAT or ACT scores, including applicants to the engineering school, applicants qualifying for the state Educational Opportunity Fund, home-schooled students, international students, and candidates for academic merit scholarships.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania State University and the University of Pennsylvania are leading the local effort to attract international students, according to a report published Monday. The number of foreign students in the United States reached an all-time high of 819,644 in 2011-12, up 7.2 percent from the year before and continuing seven consecutive years of growth, according to the Institute of International Education's annual "Open Doors" report. Those students represent a relatively small percentage of the total U.S. student population, roughly 4 percent.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mi casa, su casa . An exchange program for Spanish teenagers is looking for families in Camden County who would like to host students for the month of July. Fifteen students and a chaperone are coming from July 1 to 29, and eight students have been placed in host homes. "They're sharing their culture and you're sharing the American way of life," said Dan Herman, a coordinator for the Greater Cherry Hill area for Global Friendships, a homestay program for international students who travel abroad.
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