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NEWS
August 26, 2016
Comcast Corp. has added 150,000 families to its discounted Internet Essentials program since December, the company said on Wednesday. The Philadelphia company has now enrolled a total of 750,000 families into the program since it was launched in late 2011. Once restricted to low-income families with children, Comcast has expanded Internet Essentials to anyone living in federally subsidized public housing in Comcast cable-TV markets. The program can be reached at www.internetessentials.com or 1-855-846-8376 - Bob Fernandez
BUSINESS
June 28, 2001 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's too bad about Ricochet, the wireless Internet service with transmission speeds approaching 128 kilobits per second - more than twice as fast as a dial-up connection. After testing the service, my techie husband and I found Ricochet worked remarkably well in its service areas. There were glitches, of course: The modem sometimes lost the signal, forcing us to log on again. The battery didn't warn when it was running low. The service wasn't available everywhere. But considering the problems I've experienced with the other wireless service I use - my cell phone - Ricochet worked well.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
PHOENIX - US Airways announced Wednesday that it would be expanding in-flight Internet access, saying that 90 percent of its mainline domestic airplanes will offer WiFi service to passengers by mid-2013. The airline, which is the dominant carrier servicing Philadelphia International Airport, also said it would launch a streaming-video service that will allow passengers to watch movies and television shows or download audio books on their own laptops, mobile phones, or iPads. The new services are another way for the airline to collect additional revenue as it battles rising fuel costs.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1996 | By Michael Connor, REUTERS Inquirer Staff Writer Michael L. Rozansky contributed to this article
AT&T Corp. yesterday began offering local telephone dial-up access to the Internet. It jump-started the new service with a free, one-year, limited trial for residential customers. "The company that brought everyone the phone now will bring the Internet to everyone," AT&T chairman Robert Allen said. The AT&T WorldNet Service, available to businesses since September, will be available to long-distance home customers through regular phone lines. Under the trial offer, home users who enroll this year will get their first five hours a month of Internet use free for a year, with no minimum subscription fee. Unlimited access is available to all AT&T customers, including businesses, for a flat monthly rate of $19.95.
NEWS
December 16, 1997
Big long-distance phone companies are playing games over their deal to make it possible for needy schools, libraries and hospitals to access the Internet. As part of last year's massive deregulation of the telecommunications industry, giant companies got much of the freedom they sought to wheel and deal and to market information - freedom that could be worth billions. In return, they agreed to support steeply discounted Internet connections through a fund totaling $2.25 billion a year for schools and libraries and $400 million for hospitals.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | By Erin Mooney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After an informational meeting to address residents' concerns about Pennsbury School District's new technology plan, district officials hope to move forward and upgrade the district's outdated technology. The meeting was to answer questions about the $7 million proposal that was presented to the school board last month. It calls for incorporating new technology into curriculum changes. Internet access will be provided to all students. Besides hundreds of new computers, all schools in the district would be linked to one another.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1999 | By Ambre S. Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Philadelphia to receive an award yesterday, the Rev. Jesse Jackson played down the idea that a racial gap divides Americans. Instead, he said, resources, such as Internet access, are the larger problem. "There is a digital divide among Americans," Jackson said. "When the playing field is even . . . all can compete on the same basis. Now the challenge is to gain access to capital and close the digital divide. " Jackson spoke at a news conference yesterday at the Philadelphia Marriott, during the National Bar Association's 74th annual convention, where he received the group's Humanitarian Award.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Responding to criticism that its discounted Internet Essentials service was available only to poor families with school-age children, Comcast Corp. said Tuesday that it would expand the $9.95-a-month program to low-income senior citizens. Comcast will begin the project for senior citizens in Palm Beach County, Fla., and expand it to other markets throughout the United States through the fall, said David Cohen, executive vice president at Comcast. The date of expansion into the Philadelphia area will be determined by the success in pilot markets, Comcast said.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2002 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fed up with that cranky DSL connection? Tired of waiting for cable-modem service? Maybe it's time to put up an antenna, because the future of high-speed Internet access is wireless. At least that's how folks such as David Pugh, the chief executive officer of Sting Communications in mostly rural Lebanon County, see it. "We've got a tiger by the tail," Pugh said of his fledgling venture, which beams the Internet to 200 business customers from 40 two-way radio transceivers set on towers, buildings and silos across central and eastern Pennsylvania, including Langhorne and Bensalem.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1996 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the context of war, "ethnic cleansing" and the thousand ills that plague the nations of the former Yugoslavia, the idea of getting Internet access to the Balkans may seem like a futile luxury, let alone a logistical nightmare. But an ardent group of Philadelphia-area university students and professors is bent on widening the battle-scarred information superhighway into Bosnia as part of the rebuilding process in that strife-torn region. Project Bosnia, begun this spring by students at Villanova Law School, has collected 150 used, Internet-ready computers to ship to Bosnian schools and legal institutions.
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NEWS
August 26, 2016
Comcast Corp. has added 150,000 families to its discounted Internet Essentials program since December, the company said on Wednesday. The Philadelphia company has now enrolled a total of 750,000 families into the program since it was launched in late 2011. Once restricted to low-income families with children, Comcast has expanded Internet Essentials to anyone living in federally subsidized public housing in Comcast cable-TV markets. The program can be reached at www.internetessentials.com or 1-855-846-8376 - Bob Fernandez
BUSINESS
March 26, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Comcast Corp. will expand its $10-a-month discounted Internet Essentials program to residents of public housing in Philadelphia, Miami, Nashville, and Seattle in a project with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the federal agency and the Philadelphia cable giant said Thursday morning. The new program is the latest expansion of Comcast's Internet Essentials offering that has enrolled 600,000 low-income families. The program was launched as a condition of Comcast's acquisition of NBCUniversal in 2011 and is designed to help close the nation's seemingly intractable "digital divide" by making Internet services available to poor families.
NEWS
March 4, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Job-seekers using the Internet to fill out applications and students writing research papers on the Kennett Public Library's seven computers often find themselves running out of time before they can finish. Computer minutes are precious, and library hours are limited. But now, as part of a pilot program, the library is offering a solution. Patrons long have been able to borrow novels, biographies, videos, and compact discs. Now they can borrow the Internet. Under a monthlong program that began Tuesday, the library is lending 10 free mobile-hotspot devices.
NEWS
February 10, 2016
By Ev Ehrlich Should there be a sales tax on Internet access? Since 1998, the Internet Tax Freedom Act (ITFA) has prohibited state and local government taxation of Internet access. And in an effort to protect consumers and business owners alike, Congress is considering making ITFA permanent. But, as usual, there are problems. Access to the Internet is an American necessity. Without it, children can't keep up with schoolwork, families can't keep in touch with loved ones, and businesses both large and small can't compete.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
In a surprising shift, adults appear to be choosing wireless smartphones for Internet access over Comcast and other wireline broadband providers, according to a study released Monday. The Pew Research Center report described both a national decline in traditional broadband homes and a growth in smartphone-only households. Nationally, broadband-wired homes fell to 67 percent this year from 70 percent in 2013, the study said. Smartphone-only households rose to 13 percent from 8 percent over the same two years.
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Anita Kulick, For The Inquirer
Is your child ready for a cellphone? There's no way around it. Sooner or later, most parents will confront the issue of whether to let their children have cellphones, and if so, when? The good news is there's lots of expert advice available. The not-so-good news is none of it provides the answer. That's because no one answer is right for all parents and all kids. On this question you're on your own - and, unlike the age for legally driving and buying alcohol, there aren't any laws to back you up. One thing is sure: It shouldn't be based on the number of times your daughter tells you, "All of my friends have one. " Or, for that matter, how many of your friends have given their kids' phones.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden officials on Wednesday launched ConnectHome, a federally funded program that will provide high-speed broadband service to low-income families and seek to improve computer literacy among residents. The kickoff event, in the city Housing Authority's community center on Boyd Street in East Camden, included demonstrations of new technology provided to the city as part of the program, like interactive kiosks where residents can search for and apply for jobs, and computer curriculum tailored to pre-K students.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers has unintentionally become the site of an experiment for the 21st century: How does a university operate without Internet, email, or course-management systems? Students and faculty were forced to find out last week when a cyber attack disabled Rutgers' networks for most of a work day. A psychology graduate student, just days from defending his master's thesis, resorted to reading tiny PDFs on his phone. Undergrads taking economics depended on documents downloaded to personal devices - at the beginning-of-the-semester urging of their professor.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Responding to criticism that its discounted Internet Essentials service was available only to poor families with school-age children, Comcast Corp. said Tuesday that it would expand the $9.95-a-month program to low-income senior citizens. Comcast will begin the project for senior citizens in Palm Beach County, Fla., and expand it to other markets throughout the United States through the fall, said David Cohen, executive vice president at Comcast. The date of expansion into the Philadelphia area will be determined by the success in pilot markets, Comcast said.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
President Obama's recent announcement of a new program to extend broadband Internet into low-income homes couldn't have come at a better time. That's especially true in cities like Philadelphia, where the gaping digital divide has left so many families without a reliable online connection. ConnectHome will initially provide free or discounted broadband access to families in 28 communities nationally, including Philadelphia and Camden. The Department of Housing and Urban Development will partner with private Internet service providers to target families with school-age children living in publicly subsidized housing.
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