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BUSINESS
March 11, 2003 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday was the third anniversary of the Nasdaq composite index's all-time high of 5,048.62, the peak of the infamous tech bubble. Since tech stocks began their free fall, scores of once-high-flying dot-coms have vanished. The Nasdaq composite closed yesterday at 1,278.37, down 74.6 percent from three years ago. But with eBay Inc. trading in the high $70s, and shares of Yahoo Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. doubling over the last year, is the Internet sector recovering? A more important question: Are Internet stocks sensible investments now?
BUSINESS
January 3, 2001 | By Wendy Tanaka, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two formerly high-flying Internet companies in the area are downsizing dramatically, and one of them is moving out of the region completely. 4Anything Network, an online search company in Wayne, said it would hand out pink slips today to 40 of its 54 employees - 74 percent of its workforce. Meanwhile, U.S. Interactive Inc., an Internet-services consulting firm, confirmed yesterday that it would be closing its King of Prussia headquarters by March 23 and laying off the remaining 43 workers there.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1999 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the past decade, Safeguard Scientifics of Wayne has been a kind of cult stock, allowing its 35,000 shareholders - mostly individuals, not big institutions - to get a rare first crack at investing in new high-tech companies. Occasionally a Safeguard-backed firm might be acquired at an attractive price, or sell stock in an initial public offering (IPO). If the price was right, Safeguard investors made money. And then came the Internet. Suddenly, IPOs are a license to multiply your money - and Safeguard is planning to do more of them, in hopes a flood of Wall Street dollars will finance its vision of a lucrative network of Internet-commerce companies.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Russian-born billionaire who dropped out of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School has just made the Nobel Prize for Physics look like chump change. Yuri Milner, 50, has made big splashes before, investing hundreds of millions in the likes of Facebook and Groupon, gracing the cover of Forbes last year, and, this spring, spending $100 million for a single-family Silicon Valley home. Now, Milner, who was educated as a physicist before seeking his Wharton M.B.A. in the early '90s, has awarded $3 million each to nine physicists, including four at Princeton's Center for Advanced Study.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1998 | Daily News staff, Bloomberg News and wire reports
snacks Twinkies buys Devil Dogs Interstate Bakeries Corp., the nation's largest baking company, is buying Drake's, adding the maker of Ring Dings, Devil Dogs and Yankee Doodles snack cakes to a lineup that includes Hostess Twinkies and Wonder Bread. Terms of the all-cash transaction with Culinar Inc., the Canadian company that owns Drake's, weren't disclosed. Drake's, with a bakery in Wayne, N.J., has annual sales of $115 million, mostly in the northeastern United States.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1997 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The federal government left a gift under the tree last week for companies that provide Internet service, saying that they probably wouldn't have to pay large new fees to local telephone companies. In a notice issued Christmas Eve, the Federal Communications Commission "tentatively" concluded that Internet service providers should not have to pay so-called access fees to local phone companies. Internet service providers have said that imposing those per-minute fees on them would surely kill off cheap, flat-rate Internet service, such as the now-standard $19.95-a-month plans.
NEWS
August 6, 2006 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As the Chinese government braced two years ago for the 15th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, it sent instructions to state-controlled newspapers on how to handle coverage. One of the journalists who got the memo was Shi Tao, a reporter for the daily Contemporary Business Review in Hunan province. The memo warned that Tiananmen anniversary observances could destabilize Chinese society. Shi, using his Yahoo! account, e-mailed it to a pro-democracy Web site. A short time later, Shi, 38, was arrested and sentenced to 10 years in prison for revealing state secrets.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1996 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sorry, that number is no longer in service. That's the message that hundreds, even thousands of Internet surfers may soon get from their Internet-access providers, because of a little-noticed change in Pennsylvania telephone regulations. An Aug. 6 decision by the Public Utility Commission requires Bell Atlantic Corp. to raise the rates on a service that scores of companies had depended on to permit them to sell inexpensive Internet access. Some small Internet-access companies say the ruling threatens to kill their businesses or force them to trim operations, especially in rural areas.
NEWS
June 19, 2000
One click away. " That, according to Philadelphia's chief information officer, is how far city government is from using the Internet to streamline the delivery of government services. It couldn't happen a moment sooner. As Daily News staff writer Michael Hinkelman reports today on Page 29, Philadelphia's city government is getting ready to unveil its new Web site, its business card to the virtual world of the Internet, where people are increasingly turning to make purchases, get information and - in many cities - pay taxes and report problems.
NEWS
May 24, 2000
Back in the 1800s, while New York, Boston and Baltimore were enjoying the energy benefits of gas, Philadelphia was still in the dark ages. City government, according to the massively detailed history book "Philadelphia," was too suspicious of the new technology. It wasn't until Samuel V. Merrick, an advocate for gas lighting, was elected to City Council and pushed the issue that a gas plant was built along the Schuylkill River.Philadelphia's streets were finally lit by the warm light of gas. History once again is repeating itself, with New York, Boston, San Jose and other cities enjoying a new technology - the Internet.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 14, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
With activists camped outside his headquarters and the nation's top technology companies bashing proposed Internet rules, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Thomas Wheeler is facing a backlash over his plan to create Internet fast lanes and slow lanes. Opponents of the proposal say Wheeler has sold out to the telecom lobby, and warn of Internet haves and have-nots. But supporters say Wheeler is constrained by a federal appeals court ruling and is adapting existing laws to a modern communications technology.
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
By making another stunning acquisition Thursday, purchasing once-powerful Time Warner Cable Co. for $45.2 billion, Comcast Corp. created the following: Platforms in the two largest markets in the country, New York and Los Angeles, to promote NBC television, as it does in Philadelphia and other markets. An additional 11 million eyeballs to be captured by Comcast, which, despite its permutations, still remains a deliverer of cable TV. An enlarged stable of Comcast-owned sports networks, with one owning the rights to Los Angeles Lakers games.
NEWS
August 10, 2013
Anyone who remembers the Cold War knows the current frosty relations between the United States and Russia are far from teetering on the verge of mutually assured destruction. Neither nation wants to return to a time when the possibility of instant annihilation had American schoolchildren cowering under their desks during bombing drills - as if that would have protected them from the fallout if an actual nuclear attack had occurred. Today's friction isn't as bad. After ignoring U.S. pleas to help persuade despotic Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to step down and end that country's civil war, Russian President Vladimir Putin has decided to host Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who stole state secrets.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
It has been an enduring challenge for the media - the old and the new - to produce ad-supported content without occasionally blurring the lines between that content and the advertising that supports it. But it has proved particularly vexing for the Web as it enters its third decade - a problem highlighted by a set of letters recently sent by the Federal Trade Commission to two dozen companies that perform Internet searches. More than a decade after first raising the issue, the FTC has retrained its spotlight on something that Internet companies would rather keep in the dark: growing evidence that search firms, including some of the industry's biggest names, are blurring the distinction between advertising and the information Web users expect them to deliver.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Scott Wilson, Washington Post
SLIGO, Ireland - President Obama this week will visit a European continent deeply worried about its economy, the worsening conflict in Syria, and the uncertain direction of American leadership abroad in the fifth year of his administration. As he arrives Monday in Northern Ireland for his first trip to Europe in two years, Obama will be confronting the diplomatic fallout from his actions and inaction on some of the most urgent concerns of his European counterparts. His long delay in more aggressively supporting Syria's beleaguered opposition forces - a move his administration announced in the form of expanded military aid on the eve of his visit here - has frustrated the leaders of France and Germany.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Barton Gellman and Laura Poitras, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The National Security Agency and the FBI are tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading U.S. Internet companies, extracting audio and video chats, photographs, e-mails, documents, and connection logs that enable analysts to track one target or trace a whole network of associates, according to a top-secret document obtained by the Washington Post. The program, code-named PRISM, has not been made public until now. It may be the first of its kind. The NSA prides itself on stealing secrets and breaking codes, and it is accustomed to corporate partnerships that help it divert data traffic or sidestep barriers.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | BY BRANDON BAILEY, San Jose Mercury News
ESCALATING one of tech's biggest rivalries, Microsoft Corp. is accusing Google Inc. of compromising the privacy of Gmail users - leveling the charge in an unusual, in-your-face ad campaign that it hopes will resonate with consumers even if some analysts call it alarmist and irresponsible. The public attacks - in print, television and billboard messages that warn consumers about the supposed dangers of being "Scroogled," or mistreated by Google - marks a strategic shift in a clash of Internet titans, under the guidance of a bare-knuckle political-campaign strategist.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Russian-born billionaire who dropped out of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School has just made the Nobel Prize for Physics look like chump change. Yuri Milner, 50, has made big splashes before, investing hundreds of millions in the likes of Facebook and Groupon, gracing the cover of Forbes last year, and, this spring, spending $100 million for a single-family Silicon Valley home. Now, Milner, who was educated as a physicist before seeking his Wharton M.B.A. in the early '90s, has awarded $3 million each to nine physicists, including four at Princeton's Center for Advanced Study.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
By Ted Silary silaryt@phillynews.com In a crowded corner of St. Joseph's Prep's basketball locker room, long after much of the excitement had ebbed, coach William "Speedy" Morris finally got the chance to address his players. First things first: There'd be practice today. No one booed or even groaned. Then he noted, "Too much of this is on me. " Well, sir, the spotlight tends to resemble the sun when a guy garners his nine hundredth career coaching victory.
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Erica Werner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama is trying to rebuild the American economy, one job at a time - literally. The president asked an online town hall questioner Monday to send him her husband's resume, insisting he wanted to look into why the man remained out of work despite his background as a semiconductor engineer. "I meant what I said, if you send me your husband's resume, I'd be interested in finding out exactly what's happening right there," Obama told the questioner, Jennifer Wedel of Fort Worth, Texas.
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