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Internet Companies

BUSINESS
June 18, 2011 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - It's starting to feel like a 1999 flashback. Internet companies - some of them profitable, some not - sense a golden opportunity and are lining up to go public this year. But we're nowhere close to the giddy days of the late '90s dot-com boom, when investors bought newly issued stocks as impulsively as lottery tickets. Technology stocks today are the cheapest in more than nine years, judging by one benchmark for appraising companies. In addition, venture capitalists who bankroll high-tech start-ups aren't pouring money into the Internet like they once did. Moreover, rapidly growing Internet companies LinkedIn Corp.
NEWS
October 29, 2010 | By Troy Graham and Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writers
The U-Haul truck that pulled away from a nondescript Center City office building Wednesday night was packed with at least 81 boxes of evidence collected from one of the country's most successful providers of online adult videos. But on Thursday, the question remained: Evidence of what? Paul Fishbein, founder of AVN Media Network, the leading trade publication for the adult industry, assumed that authorities had launched an obscenity investigation. He described Richard Cohen, owner of the raided companies, as "a really good customer and a friend.
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Lanny Morgnanesi
On a day when more than 11 million Americans were out of work, I found a job. Considering the economy, it was a crowning achievement. But, sadly, it meant leaving my longtime profession, newspaper journalism. Still, I was ready - and so was it. What had once been a worthy and satisfying business was in eclipse. My departure meant a slight but welcome improvement to a woeful bottom line. I did not work for the paper you are now reading, but it and all papers are facing similar fiscal trials.
NEWS
February 28, 2008 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp. admitted yesterday that it paid people to attend a government hearing. Company critics say the freelance attendees were there to crowd them out; Comcast says they were merely saving seats for employees. The five-hour hearing Monday at Harvard University was organized by the Federal Communications Commission to address the issue of net neutrality, a hot-button topic for those who think there should be minimal restrictions on Internet traffic. The topic has drawn wide interest from college students, media-reform groups, and Internet companies.
NEWS
August 6, 2006 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As the Chinese government braced two years ago for the 15th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, it sent instructions to state-controlled newspapers on how to handle coverage. One of the journalists who got the memo was Shi Tao, a reporter for the daily Contemporary Business Review in Hunan province. The memo warned that Tiananmen anniversary observances could destabilize Chinese society. Shi, using his Yahoo! account, e-mailed it to a pro-democracy Web site. A short time later, Shi, 38, was arrested and sentenced to 10 years in prison for revealing state secrets.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2003 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday was the third anniversary of the Nasdaq composite index's all-time high of 5,048.62, the peak of the infamous tech bubble. Since tech stocks began their free fall, scores of once-high-flying dot-coms have vanished. The Nasdaq composite closed yesterday at 1,278.37, down 74.6 percent from three years ago. But with eBay Inc. trading in the high $70s, and shares of Yahoo Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. doubling over the last year, is the Internet sector recovering? A more important question: Are Internet stocks sensible investments now?
BUSINESS
January 22, 2002 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph T. Sebastianelli has done it all. He has been a lawyer, a health insurance executive, a hospital administrator and an Internet expert. Now, Sebastianelli, who spent 26 of the last 30 years in health care and insurance in the Philadelphia area, is returning to become the new president and chief executive officer of the Jefferson Health System, the Philadelphia region's largest hospital network. The Jefferson Health System board is scheduled to announce today that Sebastianelli, 55, will succeed Douglas S. Peters, who said in October he would step down as head of the Jefferson system July 1, after 5 1/2 years on the job. Sebastianelli is chairman and chief executive officer of RealMed Corp.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2001 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Internet Capital Group Inc., the Wayne company that invests in e-commerce start-ups, said yesterday that two Hong Kong investors offered to pay $100 million in cash for ICG's stake in its Asia subsidiary. ICG had purchased 53 percent of ICG Asia Ltd. for $116.8 million last year. ICG Asia manages business-to-business exchanges in Asia. The sale of its interest in ICG Asia is another move by the company - once worth more than General Motors Corp. - to pare operations and conserve funds in a market climate that no longer favors Internet companies.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2001 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Personal sympathy for Warren V. "Pete" Musser abounded yesterday, but investor and corporate reaction to his ouster as chief executive officer of Safeguard Scientifics Inc. was muted. Musser, who founded what became Safeguard in 1953, resigned under pressure as the Wayne-based holding company struggles to rebound from the market collapse of its Internet investments and its own stock price. "I'm sorry that it happened to him," said Ralph Roberts, chairman of Comcast Corp., who bought his first cable system from Musser.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Infonautics Inc., one of the first Internet companies in the Philadelphia area, has agreed to be acquired by Tucows Inc., a Toronto firm that sells domain names and distributes software online. The fate of troubled Infonautics' 40 remaining employees and its King of Prussia office remains to be determined, officials of both companies said yesterday. There was no doubt, however, that the deal would mark the end of the Infonautics name, though the company's 80,000-subscriber Electric Library online-research service and its Internet-trolling Sleuth Web sites will survive, at least for the time being.
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