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NEWS
December 27, 1997
There must be some moments in Bill Gates' rich life when he wonders whether Janet Reno has a voodoo doll with his face on it. How else to explain the number of people lining up to stick it to him and Windows, his software package that runs almost 95 percent of personal computers sold in America? From the Justice Department to a group of state attorneys general, Microsoft has been collecting as many critics in government as it has in the computer industry. Microsoft has started making some forays into the political world of Washington and will no doubt start spreading its largess to curry favor.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1998 | By David L. Wilson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Microsoft Corp. backed off in its showdown with the U.S. government yesterday, agreeing to let computer-makers offer its latest version of Windows 95 without an easy-to-use link to its Internet Explorer software. The agreement ends a contempt-of-court proceeding brought by the government against the world's largest software company, but a broader case by the Justice Department, challenging the legality of selling Explorer in a "bundle" with the Windows 95 operating system, will continue.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1997 | By Rory J. O'Connor, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In an anticlimactic first engagement of the government's antitrust war against Microsoft Corp., a federal judge ended a 90-minute hearing yesterday without issuing any rulings or indicating when he would take any further action in the case. Lawyers for the Justice Department and the world's largest software company reiterated arguments from their voluminous filings before Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson. Microsoft is accused by the government of violating a 1995 antitrust consent decree, a charge Microsoft denies.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1998 | By Dave Wilson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson, who holds the future of Microsoft Corp. in his hands, repeatedly slapped down company attorneys here yesterday during the first day of a contempt hearing in the government's antitrust case against the software giant. The judge's challenges raised warning flags that Microsoft may face a significant struggle as it fights the antitrust case in coming months. The Department of Justice has argued that Microsoft has failed to comply with an order Jackson issued last month directing the company to sell its Windows 95 operating system without the company's Web browsing software, Internet Explorer.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | By Rory J. O'Connor, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The dispute between the government and the world's most dominant software company escalated yesterday as the Justice Department asked a federal judge here to hold Microsoft Corp. in contempt for failing to comply with his order in an antitrust case. The judge had ordered the company to offer a current version of its Windows 95 operating software that would work without its Explorer Internet browser, a program that lets computer users scan the Internet. The company has said producing such software was technologically impossible.
NEWS
November 6, 1999 | By David L. Wilson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a withering indictment of Microsoft Corp., Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson declared yesterday that the world's largest software company had harmed consumers by stifling competition. As anticipated, Jackson found that Microsoft had monopoly power in the market for desktop computer operating systems. His 207-page "findings of fact" was issued after the stock market closed yesterday to avoid disruption. But he went far beyond what most analysts had expected, in essence dismissing nearly all of Microsoft's attempts to defend its business practices.
NEWS
December 21, 1997
In one sense, watching federal antitrust lawyers duel with Microsoft Corp. is like watching the local chess club champion play Garry Kasparov. Microsoft has world-champion mastery of the playing board - the warp-speed world of computers - while the government reads up on basic strategy between moves. Of course, many Americans - trained to regard any government regulators as hamhanded bullies out to ruin the American way - may have a hard time seeing the Justice Department as the underdog good guys here.
NEWS
September 11, 2001 | By Scott McCarty
The Justice Department has abdicated its responsibility to protect business and consumers from Microsoft. What now? I consider Microsoft the embodiment of evil business practices. Many innovative software companies have met their demise because Microsoft decided to put them out of business. I celebrated Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's original verdict that ordered the breakup of the software monopoly. Jackson's only fault was getting so incensed by the arrogance, obfuscation and obstructionism of the Microsoft defense that he developed an obvious, if just, bias.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1998 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Consumers will feel little impact for many months and maybe even for years from the lawsuits the Justice Department and state attorneys general filed yesterday against Microsoft Corp. Although the lawsuits filed by the federal government, 20 states and the District of Columbia have sweeping implications for technology firms, the tens of millions of people around the world who use personal computers are likely to wonder what all the fuss is about. The suits seek to prevent Microsoft from using its control of personal-computer operating systems to dominate the market for Internet browsing software.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
The federal and 20 state governments filed sweeping antitrust lawsuits against Microsoft Corp. yesterday, charging the world's most powerful software company with using unfair tactics to crush competition and restrict choice for consumers. The suits allege Microsoft, one of the most successful American companies in a generation, used a wide variety of illegal practices to deny personal computer owners the benefits of a free and competitive market and extend its monopoly on operating systems into dominance of the Internet browsing market.
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NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Raphael Satter, Associated Press
LONDON - The saga of Edward Snowden and the NSA makes one thing clear: The United States' central role in developing the Internet and hosting its most powerful players has made it the global leader in the surveillance game. Other countries, from dictatorships to democracies, are also avid snoopers, tapping into the high-capacity fiber-optic cables to intercept Internet traffic, scooping their citizens' data off domestic servers, and even launching cyberattacks to win access to foreign networks.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Jaded by juggling multiple remotes? Confounded by the connections linking your TV to your cable box to your DVD and other devices in your television room? Ignorant of how to switch inputs - or even which control to use? You know who you are, and some of you have spent time at my house. Microsoft, the long-dominant software-maker lately eclipsed by Apple's smartphones and tablets, says it has an answer: a central command station for your television, gaming, music, Internet video, even Skype video calls - all controlled by your voice and gestures.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2012 | By Robert Channick, Chicago Tribune
When Microsoft Corp. unveils a new version of its Web browser, users will be able to traverse sites as always, but with one significant difference: The company plans to make "do not track" the default setting. That means Internet Explorer 10, expected to launch in the fall, will automatically curtail the personal information garnered as users surf - data shared by third-party companies to serve up targeted advertising. The move puts Microsoft out in front of a process to set new Internet privacy standards - and puts it at odds with the $31 billion online advertising industry.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2002 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
It was in the name of consumers such as Karlie Johanson that the federal government and a phalanx of state attorneys general spent four years battling Microsoft Corp. in a landmark antitrust lawsuit. The settlement of that suit - hammered out last year by Microsoft, the Justice Department and nine states, and largely upheld by a federal judge last week - requires Microsoft to share more technical information with other software-makers, and allows customers to disable some Microsoft programs within Windows.
NEWS
September 11, 2001 | By Scott McCarty
The Justice Department has abdicated its responsibility to protect business and consumers from Microsoft. What now? I consider Microsoft the embodiment of evil business practices. Many innovative software companies have met their demise because Microsoft decided to put them out of business. I celebrated Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's original verdict that ordered the breakup of the software monopoly. Jackson's only fault was getting so incensed by the arrogance, obfuscation and obstructionism of the Microsoft defense that he developed an obvious, if just, bias.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1999 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A top executive of Microsoft Corp. yesterday defended his company's "right to innovate" even as he expressed optimism about reaching a settlement in the federal government's antitrust case against the software giant. "We hope that a settlement can be achieved. We've been saying that right from the beginning," said Robert J. Herbold, executive vice president and chief operating officer of the Redmond, Wash., company. Herbold was in Philadelphia yesterday to address the Eastern Technology Council, a group of regional technology firms.
NEWS
November 9, 1999 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Kill Bill vs. Gates is God. Depending on who you talk to, Microsoft chairman Bill Gates is the Antichrist or a great American hero. Around the virtual water coolers, the long-simmering argument reignited last Friday after a federal judge smacked Gates and Microsoft for engaging in relentless and predatory monopoly behavior. The finding is a major rebuke for the computer geek and his $90 billion in Microsoft bucks. The Justice Department case may lead to the breakup of Microsoft or force Gates to pay a huge fine.
NEWS
November 6, 1999 | By David L. Wilson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a withering indictment of Microsoft Corp., Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson declared yesterday that the world's largest software company had harmed consumers by stifling competition. As anticipated, Jackson found that Microsoft had monopoly power in the market for desktop computer operating systems. His 207-page "findings of fact" was issued after the stock market closed yesterday to avoid disruption. But he went far beyond what most analysts had expected, in essence dismissing nearly all of Microsoft's attempts to defend its business practices.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1998 | Daily News staff, Bloomberg News and wire reports
computers Microsoft to rewrite parts of Windows 98 Microsoft has been ordered to rewrite parts of Windows 98 containing an altered version of the Java programming language that is incompatible with software made by its rivals. The order by U.S. District Judge Ronald Whyte also forces the software giant to change Internet Explorer 4.0 and other Java-incorporating software, or stop shipping the products within 90 days. Sun claims Microsoft failed to adhere to terms of a 1995 licensing agreement between the two companies.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1998 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's big and tough. It's in your face. It inhabits 90 percent of all personal computers and tells them what to do. It gets your money, and it wants more. It constantly needs an upgrade. It is Microsoft - the software giant that the head of America Online has referred to as "the beast from Redmond [Washington]. " So . . . that makes Microsoft bad? Strip away the swaggering lawyers and the pelting rain of corporate press releases, and this is what the two-week-old trial of United States v. Microsoft is all about.
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