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NEWS
August 12, 2014 | By Franziska Holzschuh, Inquirer Staff Writer
For someone famous for sharing his depression with the world, Eric Jarosinski is in an extremely good mood. It is 10:30 a.m. on a sunny morning in Philadelphia, and Jarosinski is late but content. "Sorry," he says. "The bus. " He settles into his seat at the Melrose Diner, and orders coffee and an omelet with cheddar cheese and extra peppers. He will hardly touch his food over the next two hours. Instead, he talks a lot, laughs even. That might surprise the 85,000 people who follow him on Twitter.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 8,000 union letter carriers - members of the National Association of Letter Carriers, or NALC - will arrive in Philadelphia on Sunday for one of the city's largest conventions this year. They, and their families, 12,000 in all, will be everywhere. They will show up at the Convention Center in a sea of colors, with carriers wearing vests color-coded by region. On Tuesday, 4,500 of them will occupy Citizens Bank Park to watch the Phillies take on the San Francisco Giants.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp.'s David L. Cohen will testify in Washington on Wednesday for the third time regarding the cable-TV giant's proposed $45.2 billion purchase of Time Warner Cable Inc., this time before the Senate Commerce Committee. The hearing, titled "At a Tipping Point: Consumer Choice, Consolidation and the Future Video Marketplace," is to include testimony by AT&T Inc. executive John Stankey. AT&T operates one of the nation's largest wireless phone networks and offers U-Verse TV and Internet.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Can't believe Facebook might have been manipulating your news feed to play with your mood? That was last month's little bombshell on how the social network allowed researchers to tweak what nearly 700,000 Facebook members saw for one week in 2012 to test psychological theories on mood contagion. If you were truly shocked, it's fair to say you weren't really paying attention. Even if a chagrined Facebook pulls back on its openness to research, and ethicists warn of the dangers of "human experimentation," the fact is that we've all been part of a giant social and economic experiment since 1991, when the first website went online.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do we have a "right to be forgotten"? Nope. They do now in Europe. But will this "right" cross the Atlantic? Not likely. That doesn't mean people aren't pretzeled with indignation about it. The question is whether we have a right to get search services like Google and Yahoo to delete or suppress information - to "forget" us. On May 13, the European Court of Justice ruled yes. It's been a hot issue for years over there. In 2010, a Spanish lawyer sued to get Google to take down pages showing a 1998 auction notice on his home.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
In four years, the Internet will start to disappear. (Actually, it is already well on its way.) Cisco's authoritative annual Visual Networking Index (VNI) - the company's forecast of who's going to buy what for their networking needs in the future - says that by 2018, about half of everyone on the Internet will connect via laptops and desktops (they still make those?), while the other half will connect via mobile devices, tablets, wearable technology, and other "Internet of things" stuff, like dog collars, thermostats, TVs, and cars.
NEWS
May 29, 2014
WHEN THE Federal Communications Commission voted May 15 to move forward with a four-month public-comment period on how best to protect and promote an open Internet, there was a whole lotta chatter about the impending end of net neutrality - the idea that all Internet traffic should be treated equally. There was considerably less discussion about what impact new rules would have on small businesses and startups. (The FCC's open Internet rules were struck down by a federal appeals court in January.)
BUSINESS
May 27, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
When Leonard Tau's father opened his dental practice in New York in 1971, attracting business required very little effort. "My dad put a shingle up, and the patients just came," Tau said. By the time Tau started his practice in Northeast Philadelphia in 2007, the Internet had made life anything but smile-worthy for dentists. What are now more than 100 websites that collect and republish consumer reviews (Yelp, Angie's List, etc.) can turn a patient's miserable experience with a root canal into a reputation nightmare for a dentist.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - If more states legalize Internet gambling, they should work toward common ground in regulations, New Jersey's top gambling regulator said Monday at a conference here. If states copy the hodgepodge of models used for the land-based casinos and apply them to Internet casinos, "the industry won't be able to keep up," David L. Rebuck, director of the Division of Gaming Enforcement, said during a panel discussion at the East Coast Gaming Congress. "Shame on us if we don't have those discussions.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
The Internet's biggest stories last week - news about the 'Net, that is, not Turkish mine disasters, California wildfires, or the latest lunacy from NBA owner Donald Sterling - unfolded on two continents, thousands of miles apart. But both offered a valuable reminder of something easily forgotten: We're still in the early days of a world-changing technology, and still struggling - often against some mighty interests - to get it right. In Luxembourg, Europe's highest court came down hard on Google over people's rights to have their past misdeeds fade away as they used to, rather than be dredged up forever on search engines at the click of a button.
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