CollectionsInternet
IN THE NEWS

Internet

ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
If you're under the impression that only Kim Kardashian's backside can break the Internet, clearly you're not in the know about online happenings. The fashion world's latest cyber-slayer is 18-year-old Kyemah McEntyre of East Orange, N.J., who is dazzling social media Solange Knowles-style in a brilliant red and stained-glass print prom dress made of kente cloth. The series of photos McEntyre posted of her June 4 senior prom at the Cicely L. Tyson Community School of Performing and Fine Arts has since been retweeted more than 5,000 times - complete with flaming emojis that represent fiyah (or fire)
BUSINESS
June 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Only in Pennsylvania: Gamblers would not be allowed to register online to open Internet gambling accounts unless they live more than 20 miles away as the crow flies from a bricks-and-mortar casino. Any closer, and they would have to travel to a casino and register in person, under the provisions of a Senate bill in Harrisburg calling for big changes to the state's gambling landscape. The goal is to give the brick-and-mortar casinos a better chance to tap into their local target audience.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler sways his colleagues, low-income Americans will soon get a "lifeline" to high-speed Internet access, in the form of a monthly subsidy to pay for it. First established in 1985, the Lifeline program now provides a monthly discount of $9.25 to help needy people pay for one landline or wireless phone per household. Under Wheeler's proposal, eligible consumers would choose to accept the subsidy for either phone or high-speed Internet service.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Columnist
Tom and Paul Kelly still work in commercial radio, polling listeners and advising such stations as More FM Philadelphia on what music to play. Big Daddy Graham is still happy holding down the overnight schmooze slot at Sportsradio 94WIP. But for more pleasure and maybe their future, these guys are banking on Internet radio - the Kelly brothers are co-operators (with third partner, Al Clay) of the Havertown streaming service iRadioPhilly. And Graham is weekly host of a music party on Wildfire Radio, a streaming Internet radio operation based in Collingswood.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Internet content, even goofy stuff, has the chance to go viral when it elicits a strong emotion, experts say. So when a distraught young woman is caught with tears streaming down her face as she plays her piccolo - piccolo? - on national TV, it's the perfect formula for a Web sensation. "The more people care, the more they share," said Jonah Berger, associate professor of marketing at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. And people cared about Villanova senior Roxanne Chalifoux because she cared so much about her Villanova Wildcats.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
AUSTIN, Texas - At SXSW Interactive, which has attracted more than 30,000 from all over the world, real business was getting done in conference rooms and hotel bars all around the Texas capital. The SXSW Accelerator, an invitation-only tech start-up competition, took place over the weekend at the Hilton, and it had a decidedly Philadelphia flavor. But on the streets and in the Austin Convention Center, in keeping with the Internet philosophy that anything involving a cute animal will sell, there was no shortage of tech businesses putting a furry face on their clever idea.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
LOOKING FOR a really cheap deal for Internet access to help your schoolkids get their homework done? You can't do better than the free offer Comcast is extending for its Internet Essentials (5GB) Web service to low-income Philadelphia families with school-age children. The deal will deliver a decent broadband connection (5 Mps) to homes for six months for free. After that, the price goes up to $10 a month. The deadline for signing up is May 31. Newly pitched to parents in letters home from the school district and sure to be a burning topic at Wednesday's Family Literacy Night at 440 N. Broad St., helmed by Superintendent William Hite, the offer comes in the wake of Comcast's fourth annual review of the national Internet Essentials program designed to increase computer access and literacy.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
The Internet exploded recently over a dress, and my first thought was, who cares? Until I figured out that I did, very much. We begin sometime last week, when somebody on the Internet circulated a photo of a cocktail dress with horizontal stripes. The caption to the dress photo asked, "What color is this dress?" I thought they were kidding, because the stripes were obviously black and blue. So what? I didn't really get it, and I certainly didn't share it, because it wasn't very interesting.
NEWS
February 28, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday approved regulating the Internet as a utility in a 3-2 partisan vote, handing a big victory to Net neutrality proponents who lobbied for a decade for tough rules to protect consumers. The FCC's action forbids telecom companies from blocking websites, and slowing or speeding up some Internet traffic. This means that all Internet streams should be treated the same, or neutrally, without preferences. The FCC also voted to make it easier for municipally run Internet providers to expand and compete with Comcast and other private telecom companies, a move lauded by activist groups.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Michael Copps objected strongly a dozen years ago when then-Federal Communications Commission Chairman Michael Powell took what he considered a big wrong turn: classifying cable companies' broadband Internet business as a lightly regulated "information service. " Copps will be back Thursday, watching from the audience as the FCC comes full circle and embraces the logic of his 2002 dissent. If Powell's successor, Tom Wheeler, draws the expected votes of his two fellow Democrats, the agency will reclassify all types of broadband as "Title II" telecommunications services - a move Wheeler and Copps both call necessary to keep the Internet functioning as it mostly does today and, more important, as nearly everybody says it should.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|