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Interpol

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NEWS
September 17, 2007 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Almost every Interpol song contains a thrilling moment, usually just before the third chorus or the bridge, when everything - the hurtling and melodic bass, the machine-gun drums, the portentous and stentorian vocals - drops away, leaving only a naked guitar riff for a few bars. That pause shifts the dynamic by providing a few seconds of sharp clarity in contrast to the dark, post-punk tension that is Interpol's specialty. It heightens the anticipation before the rest of the band kicks back in. Saturday night, those moments were legion, as were the Interpol fans who packed the Tower Theatre.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | By Mark Stroh, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Klaus Reinke, who was convicted in February of embezzling more than $1.4 million from two Delaware County auto dealerships, apparently jumped bail Tuesday night, forfeiting his house and leaving behind his wife and 13-year-old daughter. He was to be sentenced this month to up to 14 years in prison. Reinke, 51, a German citizen who has lived in the United States for more than 20 years, was free on $50,000 bail. He was permitted to work during the day, but was required to return to his home in Villanova each night by 8. On Tuesday night, Reinke did not go home, said Timothy Rice, the assistant United States attorney who prosecuted Reinke.
NEWS
November 3, 2001 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
An early casualty of the war on terrorism is the easy sharing of information among countries - information that could avert another attack. Nations with large Muslim populations are reluctant to be seen providing intelligence to the United States. American law enforcement officials worry that loose tongues will sabotage their investigative leads. Sounds like a job for Interpol, the cool-sounding but oft-misunderstood international police agency based in France. Ronald K. Noble, a South Jersey native and the first non-European to head the 78-year-old organization, is hoping to make Interpol more vital as the go-to agency that can bridge a divide of distrust.
NEWS
July 3, 1999 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ronald K. Noble, a former U.S. attorney in Philadelphia who prosecuted several high-profile drug and corruption cases in the city in the 1980s, was chosen yesterday to become the new chief of Interpol, the global police information clearinghouse. The South Jersey native is the first American named to the position. The 13-member executive committee of Interpol, which has headquarters in the central French city of Lyon, selected Noble over seven other candidates to lead the 76-year-old organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1990 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
With the start of the 1990 baseball season in question, the timing of this week's major video release - a popular baseball fantasy - couldn't be better. Also on the bill: a muddled biography of a Central American archbishop and a befuddled version of a classic horror tale. FIELD OF DREAMS (1989) (MCA) 106 minutes. Kevin Costner, Amy Madigan, James Earl Jones, Burt Lancaster. Much like the starting pitching for the Phillies last season, director Phil Alden Robinson's gossamer fantasy requires a willing suspension of disbelief.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | By P.J. Corso, Special to the Inquirer
Maybe it was politics, or religion, or justice. Maybe it was all of those. Maybe it was none. Government officials and international-relations experts can only speculate on why Iranian officials recently arrested former Pittsburgh gynecologist Reza Rasti, who had fled to Tehran before standing trial here for rape charges. But one thing is certain: U.S. officials are pleasantly surprised. "We expected nothing," said John Russell, a spokesman for the U.S. Justice Department in Washington.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Angela Charlton, Associated Press
PARIS - Police found the children, some as young as 6, working deep in gold mines and cotton fields around Burkina Faso. They were unpaid and unschooled. Some were being sexually abused. An international police operation has freed nearly 400 children from forced labor in the West African country and arrested 73 people suspected of child trafficking or forced labor, Interpol announced Thursday. It was a rare victory against forced child labor in West Africa, which has some of the world's highest poverty rates.
NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Javier Cordoba and Deb Riechmann, Associated Press
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica - A fugitive former CIA base chief detained in Panama this week is being sent to the United States instead of Italy, which wanted him to serve prison time in the 2003 abduction of a terror suspect, the Obama administration said Friday. Robert Seldon Lady was held in Panama on Thursday after Italy and Interpol requested his arrest for his role in the antiterrorism program known as extraordinary rendition. After barely a day in detention, he was put on a plane to the United States by the Panamanian government, a close U.S. ally that offered no explanation for its decision.
NEWS
January 12, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Defense Department said yesterday that a U.S. jet fighter was missing over the Mediterranean but denied reports from the Middle East that Libyan antiaircraft fire had shot it down. The F-18 aircraft from the aircraft carrier Coral Sea, with one man on board, disappeared during a routine training mission on Wednesday, a Defense Department spokesman said. The spokesman said the pilot and the plane from the Marine fighter attack squadron were lost at sea south of Nice, France.
NEWS
July 6, 2010
Health warning in Puerto Rico SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - Puerto Rico's top health official warned Monday that the U.S.-affiliated island could face a grave dengue fever outbreak if people don't act quickly to destroy breeding areas for mosquitoes that spread the disease. Health Secretary Lorenzo Gonzalez Feliciano issued the warning after a 37-year-old woman from the northern town of Hatillo died of the hemorrhagic form of the tropical virus. Her death was the third fatality from dengue fever this year on the island.
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NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Javier Cordoba and Deb Riechmann, Associated Press
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica - A fugitive former CIA base chief detained in Panama this week is being sent to the United States instead of Italy, which wanted him to serve prison time in the 2003 abduction of a terror suspect, the Obama administration said Friday. Robert Seldon Lady was held in Panama on Thursday after Italy and Interpol requested his arrest for his role in the antiterrorism program known as extraordinary rendition. After barely a day in detention, he was put on a plane to the United States by the Panamanian government, a close U.S. ally that offered no explanation for its decision.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Angela Charlton, Associated Press
PARIS - Police found the children, some as young as 6, working deep in gold mines and cotton fields around Burkina Faso. They were unpaid and unschooled. Some were being sexually abused. An international police operation has freed nearly 400 children from forced labor in the West African country and arrested 73 people suspected of child trafficking or forced labor, Interpol announced Thursday. It was a rare victory against forced child labor in West Africa, which has some of the world's highest poverty rates.
NEWS
February 22, 2012 | By Munir Ahmed, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistan will ask Interpol for help in arresting former President Pervez Musharraf for his failure to prevent the assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, the interior minister said Tuesday. Rehman Malik said the government was seeking Musharraf's arrest because he allegedly failed to provide adequate security for Bhutto, who was killed in a gun and suicide-bomb attack in 2007. He made the comments in a televised address to lawmakers in Sindh province, Bhutto's political stronghold.
NEWS
December 2, 2010 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
A riches of embarrassment. That's what Sunday's WikiLeaks "document dump" - 251,287 documents, to be exact, some going back to 1966 - really is. No bombshells. In the United States, China, Yemen, and Germany, pols and ambassadors are red-faced. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, among others, is looking pretty sneaky. The WikiLeaks leaks have embarrassed people and fueled many a talk show and political mouth. But the real story is that of information: In today's media world, info is immortal, and hackers have the edge, creating a designer headache for those - governments, for example - who want to keep info secret.
NEWS
July 6, 2010
Health warning in Puerto Rico SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - Puerto Rico's top health official warned Monday that the U.S.-affiliated island could face a grave dengue fever outbreak if people don't act quickly to destroy breeding areas for mosquitoes that spread the disease. Health Secretary Lorenzo Gonzalez Feliciano issued the warning after a 37-year-old woman from the northern town of Hatillo died of the hemorrhagic form of the tropical virus. Her death was the third fatality from dengue fever this year on the island.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Swift and suspenseful, Tom Tykwer's 1999 art-house hit Run Lola Run signaled the arrival of a smart, inventive new filmmaker. But the German director's subsequent entries - The Princess and the Warrior; Heaven; Perfume: The Story of a Murderer and now The International - have been uneven at best. (Of the bunch, I vote for Heaven, even if the guy opposite Cate Blanchett is that genuinely annoying Giovanni Ribisi.) The International, coming in the midst of our epic financial crisis, should have been a winner.
NEWS
February 12, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
They say the solution to our current financial predicament is a new "bad bank," though I doubt it will be as bad as the bank in "The International. " This purported thriller stars Clive Owen as a obsessive Interpol investigator convinced that a global banking conglomerate is assassinating people as it works to consolidate a deal to provide arms to an African insurgency. Interpol believes the arms deal is part of a pattern by which the bank uses transactions to seek long-term leverage over people in power.
NEWS
September 17, 2007 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Almost every Interpol song contains a thrilling moment, usually just before the third chorus or the bridge, when everything - the hurtling and melodic bass, the machine-gun drums, the portentous and stentorian vocals - drops away, leaving only a naked guitar riff for a few bars. That pause shifts the dynamic by providing a few seconds of sharp clarity in contrast to the dark, post-punk tension that is Interpol's specialty. It heightens the anticipation before the rest of the band kicks back in. Saturday night, those moments were legion, as were the Interpol fans who packed the Tower Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Yuri Orlov (Nicolas Cage) is an American success story. Raised in the Little Odessa section of Brooklyn, where his parents moved after fleeing the Soviet Ukraine, he grows restless working in the family deli and sets out on his own. Full of confidence and a willingness to take risks, he bluffs and beguiles his way into business, becoming wealthy and powerful in pursuit of the American dream. The fact that he is selling weapons - automatic rifles, missiles and tanks - doesn't seem to bother him. If he didn't, Yuri rationalizes, somebody else would.
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