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Interrogation

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NEWS
April 4, 1986 | By Sandra McIntosh, Special to The Inquirer
Alleging that an illegal interrogation of his client took place Sunday, a defense attorney for one of two migrant farm workers accused of murdering a Jordanian peddler sought a restraining order against the Gloucester County prosecutor's office in Superior Court yesterday. Public Defender William Buckman, who represents David Rivera, 21, of Arecibo, Puerto Rico, asked Judge Ernest L. Alvino to bar the prosecutor's office from interrogating his client or Jose Ramon DeJesus Santiago, 20, of Arecibo, also charged in connection with the slaying, unless an attorney is present.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1990 | By Tom Jacobs, Los Angeles Daily News
It's easy to see why Polish authorities have only now allowed the release of "Interrogation. " This bleak 1982 drama depicts the nation, under the now-defunct Communist regime, as a brutal police state. Set in a rat-infested women's prison, it portrays a world where the accused have no rights and the authorities have no morals. Unintentionally, it also recalls an era when filmmakers had no subtlety. "Interrogation" is a courageous film and an important one in Polish history, but it isn't particularly good drama.
NEWS
February 12, 1988 | By Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
A prosecutor and a defense attorney wrangled yesterday about the circumstances under which Harrison "Marty" Graham's decided in August to waive his right to an attorney before he gave police a statement admitting killing seven women in his North Philadelphia apartment. Graham's mother, Lillian Graham, said in an interview late yesterday that police had blocked her efforts that day to have Graham represented by a lawyer when he was questioned. "I told them I wanted him to have a lawyer," Lillian Graham said.
NEWS
December 15, 2005 | By William Douglas and James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The House threw its weight yesterday behind a Senate-approved ban on the use of cruel, inhuman and degrading interrogation techniques - a defeat for President Bush that increased pressure on the White House to reach a compromise. Democrats were joined by 107 Republicans in the nonbinding 308-122 vote, which instructed House members to adopt the Senate ban during conference-committee negotiations over a Defense Department spending bill. Rep. John Murtha (D., Pa.), who has recently clashed with the White House over Iraq policy, proposed the instruction.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By John Mooney, NJ SPOTLIGHT
New Jersey educators are getting lessons in police interrogation techniques and how to tell whether someone is lying - even if they are only in elementary school - as the stakes have increased in the crackdown on bullying. More than 500 teachers, counselors, and administrators completed training sessions this spring with state and outside experts - including a state police sergeant - that included detailed investigation and "interview" techniques. (One suggestion: Never say interrogation .)
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Former Sen. Rick Santorum (R., Pa.), a 2012 presidential contender, said Tuesday that Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.), who spent 51/2 years enduring brutal treatment by his North Vietnamese captors, doesn't know how effective waterboarding and other harsh interrogation techniques can be. Santorum insisted the tactics led the United States to Osama bin Laden. McCain, the top Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee, said last week that waterboarding al-Qaeda's Khalid Sheikh Mohammed did not provide information that led to bin Laden's compound in Pakistan.
NEWS
May 18, 2009 | By Charles Krauthammer
Earlier this month, I wrote a column outlining two exceptions to the no-torture rule: the ticking-time-bomb scenario and its less extreme variant, in which a high-value terrorist refuses to divulge crucial information that could save innocent lives. The column elicited protest and opposition that were, shall we say, spirited. And occasionally stupid. Dan Froomkin, writing for washingtonpost.com and echoing a common meme among my critics, asserted that "the ticking-time-bomb scenario only exists in two places: on TV and in the dark fantasies of power-crazed and morally deficient authoritarians.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1998 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Nakedness doesn't just mean taking your clothes off. As Ishmael Houston-Jones demonstrates in his new performance work, Specimens, emotional nakedness can be as revealing, and involve the same issues of voyeurism and intimacy, as the physical kind. New York-based Houston-Jones created this piece in collaboration with his performers: the dancers of Headlong Dance Theater, Stanya Kahn and Paule Turner, Duchess - all powerful choreographers themselves. There was plenty of skin to be seen, too, Thursday night, starting with Houston-Jones himself in underwear and heels.
NEWS
December 18, 2005 | By Drew Brown INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Under the torture ban sponsored by Sen. John McCain, Americans questioning suspected terrorists would be limited to techniques authorized by the Army's manual on intelligence interrogation, a guide that clearly spells out the rules. The manual says "the use of force, mental torture, threats, insults, or exposure to unpleasant and inhumane treatment of any kind is prohibited by law and is neither authorized nor condoned by the U.S. Government. " Defense officials say those rules will remain the standard.
NEWS
June 23, 2004 | By Stephen Henderson, Shannon McCaffrey and Jonathan F. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Stung by the perception that the Bush administration may have endorsed torture as an interrogation technique, White House officials declassified documents yesterday that show President Bush ordered in early 2002 that al-Qaeda and Taliban prisoners be treated "humanely" even though he said they were not protected by the Geneva Conventions. At the same time, the Justice Department yesterday disavowed a memo to Bush that suggested terror suspects could be tortured if necessary. Justice said its lawyers were "scrubbing" all of their legal guidance on interrogation methods.
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NEWS
June 3, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
GET READY for your close-ups, everybody. The Philadelphia Police Department is slated to receive an $84,780 grant tomorrow from the nonprofit Philadelphia Police Foundation that will cover the cost of installing recording equipment in interrogation rooms in detective divisions across the city. The grant is expected to be presented to Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey by Maureen Rush, president of the nonprofit's board and superintendent of the University of Pennsylvania's police force.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The cameras are now rolling. Philadelphia police this week completed the installation of eight cameras inside the Homicide Unit's four interview rooms - the first step of a new department policy to record interrogations in all major crimes. For now, the cameras, operational as of Wednesday, are limited to the Homicide Unit, but Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey plans to install them in every detective division as soon as funding permits. Some glitches involving computer coding had delayed the start of the program, which had been scheduled to begin by March 1, said Lt. John Stanford, a department spokesman.
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
He would change very little. John Yoo, the former Justice Department lawyer and Philadelphia native who laid the legal groundwork for President George W. Bush's administration to use waterboarding and other harsh interrogation techniques, told faculty and students at Drexel University law school Thursday that he had correctly interpreted the law. And that he would do it again. "I do stand by the line that we drew," Yoo said. Yoo came to the law school for an hour-long exchange with Harvey Rishikof, a former legal counsel to the FBI who teaches national security law at Drexel.
NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Beginning next year, Philadelphia detectives must video-record interrogations in all homicide cases and end a long-standing practice of holding suspects for long stretches even when no charges are filed. That change and a host of others announced Thursday by Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey came at the urging of defense lawyers who had complained that their clients had been mistreated. Ramsey's decision was a dramatic one for a department once notorious for its abusive treatment of suspects, particularly in murder cases.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE PHILADELPHIA Police Department's new interview and interrogation policy - a copy of which was obtained by the Daily News - lays out numerous rules. Although many of the stipulations were already in practice, they had not officially been part of a written policy. Some of the rules include: * Witnesses, crime victims and even potential suspects who are brought in by police for "noncustodial, nonaccusatory" questioning are to be told that they can stop and leave at any time.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THIS ISN'T YOUR AVERAGE New Year's resolution. Come Jan. 1, the Philadelphia Police Department will implement a sweeping new interview policy that's aimed at protecting the rights of people who are questioned by detectives - and eliminating instances of investigators being accused of coercing confessions from suspects. A separate initiative, to be rolled out at a later date, will require interrogations in the Homicide Unit to be video-recorded - years after the practice became common in police departments across the country.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By John Mooney, NJ SPOTLIGHT
New Jersey educators are getting lessons in police interrogation techniques and how to tell whether someone is lying - even if they are only in elementary school - as the stakes have increased in the crackdown on bullying. More than 500 teachers, counselors, and administrators completed training sessions this spring with state and outside experts - including a state police sergeant - that included detailed investigation and "interview" techniques. (One suggestion: Never say interrogation .)
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANFORD, Fla. - Jurors in the George Zimmerman trial listened yesterday to a series of police interviews with detectives growing more pointed in their questioning of the neighborhood watch volunteer's account of how he came to fatally shoot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Prosecutors played audiotapes and videotapes of the interviews that Zimmerman had with Sanford police investigators Doris Singleton and Chris Serino in the hours and days after he fatally shot the Miami teen. In an early interview, just hours after the Feb. 26, 2012, shooting, Singleton recounted that Zimmerman noticed a cross she was wearing and said: "In Catholic religion, it's always wrong to kill someone.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Jerry Markon and Sari Horwitz, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The pending nomination of James Comey to be FBI director began on Thursday to reopen old debates over George W. Bush-era national security policies. And despite Comey's well-publicized role in challenging some of the controversial practices, he has come under attack from civil liberties advocates. One day after President Obama's plan to nominate the former senior Justice Department official to run the FBI became public, the American Civil Liberties Union became the second civil liberties group to raise questions about Comey's involvement in the Bush administration's post-Sept.
NEWS
April 27, 2013 | By Colleen Long and Jennifer Peltz, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Boston Marathon bombers were headed for New York's Times Square to blow up the rest of their explosives, authorities said Thursday, in what they portrayed as a chilling, spur-of-the-moment scheme that fell apart when the brothers realized the car they had hijacked was low on gas. "New York City was next on their list of targets," Mayor Michael Bloomberg said. New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said Dzhokhar Tsarnaev told interrogators from his hospital bed that he and his older brother decided on the spot last Thursday night to drive to New York and launch an attack.
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