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Intervention

NEWS
May 21, 1991 | By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
If President Bush has his way, the "new world order" will be as much his legacy as the New Deal is Franklin Roosevelt's. He is very insistent on the term. He has been using it continually since August. What does it mean? The President is grappling with two competing versions of it. One was offered on April 13 when, in a speech at Maxwell Air Force Base, Bush finally outlined its principal elements: "Peaceful settlements of disputes, solidarity against aggression, reduced and controlled arsenals and just treatment of all peoples.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | By Marjorie Valbrun, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The lives of poor New Jersey children have not improved significantly over the years even though child welfare advocates have long warned of dire consequences for the state if it did not address their needs. So says the fourth annual "Kids Count New Jersey," which chronicles child well-being statewide. The report, released yesterday by the Association for Children of New Jersey, shows that while the measurements of such factors as infant mortality and teenage pregnancies showed a slight decline in 1992 - the last year for which statistics were available - from the previous three years counted, the overall picture has not improved significantly in the state's 21 counties.
NEWS
February 8, 2006 | By Kera Ritter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About 1,000 arrests in Philadelphia each year are of suspects too young to see a movie rated PG-13. They are 10- to 12-year-olds with rap sheets that include rape, robbery, aggravated assault and weapons offenses, according to a report made public yesterday by Philadelphia Safe and Sound, a nonprofit advocacy and research organization. "These are fifth, sixth and seventh graders," said Kathleen Meyers, director of research and policy at the agency, which produced "Lifetimes at Risk: Young Offenders Between 10-12 Years of Age. " "We have to realize they're young and they can really turn things around and get back on the right path.
NEWS
November 8, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"Take some young onions . . . add . . . potatoes, tomatoes and cabbage, furnish 100 pounds of flour . . . to work up into bread . . . put in chicken purchased locally . . . " and you have the makings of Thanksgiving dinner for 135 U.S. Marines serving in Nicaragua in the fall of 1912. The source of this recipe is one of more than 700 letters written by Marine Sgt. Frank F. Zissa of Stowe to Flora M. Huetter of Pottstown between 1906 and 1919. The letters, edited by Zissa's son Robert, were the subject of an article, "Letters From a Pottstown Marine," in the fall 1991 Bulletin of the Historical Society of Montgomery County.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | By WILLIAM RASPBERRY
Edwin Dorn knows all the reasons why the United States should beware of getting involved militarily in Somalia. As a military policy analyst at the Brookings Institution, he's even supplied some of those reasons to journalists interested in a more complete assessment of the risks and benefits of sending troops to that desperate country. There is, at the top of the list, the prospect of our getting bogged down in a distant, indeterminate action - unable to achieve a lasting solution and unable to leave because of the certainty that our leaving would mean a return to chaos.
NEWS
January 19, 1986 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
The tow-headed toddler sits in the middle of a plastic swimming pool, contentedly shifting mounds of styrofoam. He sings his ABCs with perfect pitch, but when asked his name he replies, "What's your name?" He repeats every question, rarely giving answers. Tommy often wanders around with a blank look on his angelic face. He had infantile myoclonic seizures - an early childhood disorder often associated with neurological problems - when he was a baby, and now, at 2 1/2, he lags behind the expected levels for gross and fine motor development, socialization and language.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | Knight-Ridder Tribune / RICARDO MAZALAN
U.S. Marines in Somalia filed into an amphibious vehicle last week as they and other U.N. peacekeeping forces ended a two-year intervention. The mission fed thousands of starving Somalis but was unable to bring stability to the nation. The warlords who were in place before the intervention were there when it ended.
NEWS
February 3, 1993 | by Gideon Rose, From the New York Times
Both supporters and opponents of American intervention in Bosnia have been reluctant to draw explicit lessons from Vietnam. The wars and the world situation are indeed different. But real parallels exist. Three decades ago the United States had to choose among four basic options: non-involvement; striving for a negotiated settlement; limited intervention; and overwhelming force to guarantee a client's victory. National leaders agreed we should prevent South Vietnam from falling to the Communists but not risk war with China or the Soviet Union, so they ruled out the first and last options.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since Downingtown school officials began offering a crisis-intervention program for high school students this year, about one-third of the teenagers seeking help have asked to be talked out of committing suicide. According to the counselors and administrators in charge of the Downingtown Senior High School Student Assistance Services, the three-month-old program is reaching students the school never could reach before. During a meeting Wednesday of the Downingtown Area School District Board of Directors, board members heard a status report.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Elaine Ganley, Associated Press
PARIS - An Algeria-based al-Qaeda offshoot said in an online video on Tuesday that Muslims have an obligation to attack French interests around the world because of France's military intervention in Mali. In a message posted on YouTube, Abou Obeida Youssef Al-Annabi, a notable in the al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb group, or AQIM, said the "crusade" led by France in Mali makes its interests "legitimate targets. " French President Francois Hollande said he takes the threat seriously.
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