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Intervention

NEWS
September 6, 2013
THERE ARE a number of legitimate reasons to oppose intervention in Syria. There are many smart people, people whom I respect and with whom I share a philosophical foxhole, who lay out those reasons with eloquence and passion. *  Why now? (Why, indeed, when we did nothing in Rwanda and the Sudan?) *  Syrian President Bashar Assad is no worse than the Islamic jihadists challenging his authority. (True, even though he has bigger guns.) *  It's a civil war. Why should Americans risk our own blood and treasure to save Syrian souls?
NEWS
December 15, 1992 | By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
Why Somalia and not Bosnia? The question is important because unless it is answered, Somalia risks becoming either a dangerous precedent or just a farewell fit of conscience by a dying administration. It is true, but insufficient, to say that TV pictures of starving Somalis summon an instinctive desire to do something. A government that is not reckless with the lives of its soldiers must enunciate some logic beyond instinct for risking those lives in a situation that does not remotely engage the national interest.
NEWS
July 2, 2003 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Ten years after a disastrous U.S. military intervention in Somalia, President Bush is thinking about sending troops to another African trouble spot: Liberia. Faced with growing calls for an American peacekeeping force, Bush met with his top foreign-policy advisers last weekend and again yesterday to discuss his options for dealing with a bloody civil war in the West African nation. Britain, France, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan, and both sides in the conflict have asked for U.S. help in enforcing a cease-fire.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Tia Swanson, Special to The Inquirer
The former dean of Glassboro State College's business school has qualified for the county's pretrial-intervention program - thanks, in a way, to the state's sales tax. Harold Lucius, 53, was arrested in June and accused of trying to steal a $199.99 portable telephone from Bradlee's in Turnersville. Lucius was charged with a disorderly person's offense and his case was brought before the municipal court, where a hearing was scheduled and partially completed. Simultaneously, however, Lucius' attorney, Michael Angelini, had filed papers in county court arguing that Lucius should have been charged with a greater offense.
NEWS
September 16, 2014
ONE OF the points that the Democratic candidate for governor makes is that he supports raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. On his website he cites the Economic Policy Institute and endorses their proposal to raise the minimum wage to the aforementioned $10.10. But when you go to their website you find that their plan calls for a $0.95 wage increase over three years which eventually gets to $10.10 in 2016. I don't believe that Wolf has made that differentiation clear. So if you're thinking that if you vote for Mr. Wolf in November that you're going to be getting paid $10.10 as soon as he assumes office, then you're mistaken.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Early educational intervention and teaching parents how to enhance childhood development can significantly improve the outlook for premature, low-birthweight babies, a major study has concluded. The study, reported in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, was done in Philadelphia and seven other cities. It found that low-birthweight babies who received early-intervention services had significantly higher IQs and fared better on other evaluation tests at the age of 3 than low- birthweight babies who received typical pediatric care.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | By GEORGE F. WILL
This intervention is a good-neighbor policy. America's role in Panama - in effect, administering a recount on last May's elections - is an act of hemispheric hygiene, and it comes at a propitious moment. It punctuates a decade of recovery of national purposefulness and a year of militant democracy. Coinciding with what can be considered the climax of the Cold War, the intervention turns a page in the book of American history and begins, on a fresh sheet of paper, writing another chapter in America's oldest story.
NEWS
March 9, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
She was heading home after school on Jan. 19 with her mother, brother and three other students when their station wagon was hit by a tractor-trailer. Joanna Hutson, a fifth grader at Octorara Intermediate School, was thrown through the hatchback onto Route 372. Her death sent a shock through the school, which still hasn't completely recovered. It also provided a test for a program school administrators hoped they would never have to use - a special intervention project designed to deal with such tragedies.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Aomar Ouali and Paul Schemm, Associated Press
Breaking News update: ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) - Algerian official: 20 foreign hostages, including Americans, escape from their captors. More to come; the original story is below:   ALGIERS, Algeria - As Algerian army helicopters clattered overhead deep in the desert, Islamist extremists hunkered down for the night in a natural gas complex they had assaulted Wednesday morning, killing two people and taking dozens of foreigners hostage in...
NEWS
November 15, 1996 | by David Rieff, New York Times
From the civil wars in Somalia and Bosnia to the current crisis in Zaire, it is the international aid agencies that have most strongly and consistently called for military intervention in humanitarian disasters. Only through a combination of military muscle and logistical support, they insist, can we hope to rescue starving people, such as the more than 1 million Rwandan Hutu refugees in eastern Zaire. In the short term, this argument usually makes sense. Lives are saved when soldiers protect relief workers.
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