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NEWS
November 28, 2011
Theodore Corbin, medical director of Healing Hurt People, a violence-intervention program of the Drexel University College of Medicine, can pinpoint the moment he pledged his career to emergency care. It was 1992, the day his father's car skidded on black ice near 30th Street Station. Corbin's mother was in the passenger seat. Corbin, then a first-year medical student, sat in back. "Teddy, check on your mother," his father said before staggering from the car. Her seat had collapsed and she had passed out. When she came to, she told her son to check on his father, who lay unconscious at the side of the road.
NEWS
September 4, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Now that NATO has helped to overthrow Moammar Gadhafi, some pundits are calling for similar action against Syria. So far the chorus is muted, composed mainly of op-eds by neoconservatives who promoted the Iraq war. Back then they were certain that regime change in Baghdad would undercut Iran and make the region Israel-friendly (the opposite happened). They now argue that regime change in Damascus - a close friend to Iran - would undercut Tehran and help Israel. They want NATO to take on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad next.
NEWS
June 26, 2011
It comes as no surprise that the Christie administration closed its eyes when critical factors screamed for state education officials to take a more active role with Camden schools. Gov. Christie has made it clear from the day he entered office that he would rather push for charters and vouchers as alternatives to bad public schools than do what is needed to fix them. Lately, Christie seemed to be giving the troubled Camden system more of his attention. But it now looks as if that was just part of his strategy to leverage more support for charters.
NEWS
June 26, 2011
Tim Chapman is chief operating officer of Heritage Action for America (heritageaction.com), a conservative grassroots advocacy group based in Washington Ford Motor Co. is on to something. This year, hundreds of taxis, powered by compressed natural gas, will pop up around the country: 120 Ford Transit Connects in the Los Angeles area, 70 in Connecticut. Las Vegas, St. Louis, and Philadelphia will also see their own fleet of Transit Connects soon. America's abundant supply of cheap, accessible natural gas and the stubbornly high cost of gasoline and diesel are making natural gas vehicles more attractive and economical.
NEWS
April 10, 2011
Explaining his decision to forgo Chicago for Philadelphia, Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey last week said he was overwhelmed by the phone calls he had received asking him to stay put. Many of the calls came from business and civic leaders, sicced on Ramsey by the man with the most to lose if he left - Mayor Nutter. But speaking at City Hall, Ramsey didn't mention another plea he had received. This one came from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Cardinal Justin Rigali spoke with the commissioner while Ramsey was still trying to make up his mind about which city to call home.
NEWS
April 8, 2011
By Harvey M. Sapolsky and Benjamin H. Friedman America's halfhearted adventure in Libya falls within a cycle of U.S. military intervention since the end of the Cold War: Success brings hubris, hubris causes overreach and failure, and failure breeds caution - though not necessarily restraint. Once another cautious intervention seems to succeed, the cycle begins anew. The first major post-Cold War U.S. military intervention was cautious. Once an American-led coalition ejected Iraqi forces from Kuwait, in 1991, the first Bush administration resisted pressure to overthrow Saddam Hussein by marching on to Baghdad or fighting alongside Shiite insurgents.
NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Margaret Talev and David Lightman, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Monday declared the U.S.-led military intervention in Libya a success, saying that it had averted "a massacre" by longtime leader Moammar Gadhafi and that NATO's takeover of the multilateral mission this week means the United States can shift to a support role with less risk and cost. "Tonight, I can report that we have stopped Gadhafi's deadly advance," Obama said, speaking from the National Defense University in Washington. The address was designed to respond to criticism that he had not sufficiently explained the goals of the first major military involvement he has initiated abroad.
NEWS
March 29, 2011 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Defending the first war launched on his watch, President Obama declared last night that the United States intervened in Libya to prevent a slaughter of civilians that would have stained the world's conscience and "been a betrayal of who we are. " Yet he ruled out targeting Moammar Gadhafi, warning that trying to oust him militarily would be a costly mistake. Obama announced that NATO would take command over the entire Libya operation tomorrow, keeping his pledge to get the U.S. out of the lead - but offering no estimate on when the conflict might end. "To brush aside America's responsibility as a leader and - more profoundly - our responsibilities to our fellow human beings under such circumstances would have been a betrayal of who we are," Obama said.
NEWS
March 27, 2011 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
I wonder how many liberals would've voted for Barack Obama if he had stumped the nation with this campaign vow: "We're fighting two wars, but as president I pledge to change that policy by ordering up a third. And I will do so by exercising the prerogatives of the imperial presidency. George W. Bush felt it was necessary to get congressional authorization for the war in Iraq, but I will do him one better. When I launch our third intervention, I pledge to inform the members of Congress only when it's too late for them to do anything about it. Thank you very much!"
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