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Intervention

NEWS
June 26, 2011
Tim Chapman is chief operating officer of Heritage Action for America (heritageaction.com), a conservative grassroots advocacy group based in Washington Ford Motor Co. is on to something. This year, hundreds of taxis, powered by compressed natural gas, will pop up around the country: 120 Ford Transit Connects in the Los Angeles area, 70 in Connecticut. Las Vegas, St. Louis, and Philadelphia will also see their own fleet of Transit Connects soon. America's abundant supply of cheap, accessible natural gas and the stubbornly high cost of gasoline and diesel are making natural gas vehicles more attractive and economical.
NEWS
April 10, 2011
Explaining his decision to forgo Chicago for Philadelphia, Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey last week said he was overwhelmed by the phone calls he had received asking him to stay put. Many of the calls came from business and civic leaders, sicced on Ramsey by the man with the most to lose if he left - Mayor Nutter. But speaking at City Hall, Ramsey didn't mention another plea he had received. This one came from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Cardinal Justin Rigali spoke with the commissioner while Ramsey was still trying to make up his mind about which city to call home.
NEWS
April 8, 2011
By Harvey M. Sapolsky and Benjamin H. Friedman America's halfhearted adventure in Libya falls within a cycle of U.S. military intervention since the end of the Cold War: Success brings hubris, hubris causes overreach and failure, and failure breeds caution - though not necessarily restraint. Once another cautious intervention seems to succeed, the cycle begins anew. The first major post-Cold War U.S. military intervention was cautious. Once an American-led coalition ejected Iraqi forces from Kuwait, in 1991, the first Bush administration resisted pressure to overthrow Saddam Hussein by marching on to Baghdad or fighting alongside Shiite insurgents.
NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Margaret Talev and David Lightman, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Monday declared the U.S.-led military intervention in Libya a success, saying that it had averted "a massacre" by longtime leader Moammar Gadhafi and that NATO's takeover of the multilateral mission this week means the United States can shift to a support role with less risk and cost. "Tonight, I can report that we have stopped Gadhafi's deadly advance," Obama said, speaking from the National Defense University in Washington. The address was designed to respond to criticism that he had not sufficiently explained the goals of the first major military involvement he has initiated abroad.
NEWS
March 29, 2011 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Defending the first war launched on his watch, President Obama declared last night that the United States intervened in Libya to prevent a slaughter of civilians that would have stained the world's conscience and "been a betrayal of who we are. " Yet he ruled out targeting Moammar Gadhafi, warning that trying to oust him militarily would be a costly mistake. Obama announced that NATO would take command over the entire Libya operation tomorrow, keeping his pledge to get the U.S. out of the lead - but offering no estimate on when the conflict might end. "To brush aside America's responsibility as a leader and - more profoundly - our responsibilities to our fellow human beings under such circumstances would have been a betrayal of who we are," Obama said.
NEWS
March 27, 2011 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
I wonder how many liberals would've voted for Barack Obama if he had stumped the nation with this campaign vow: "We're fighting two wars, but as president I pledge to change that policy by ordering up a third. And I will do so by exercising the prerogatives of the imperial presidency. George W. Bush felt it was necessary to get congressional authorization for the war in Iraq, but I will do him one better. When I launch our third intervention, I pledge to inform the members of Congress only when it's too late for them to do anything about it. Thank you very much!"
NEWS
March 19, 2011 | By Warren P. Strobel, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The war, if it comes, could well be called the not-Iraq war. Eight years ago Saturday, President George W. Bush launched the U.S. invasion of Iraq, without an explicit mandate from the United Nations or much concern over which U.S. allies went along. France vehemently opposed the invasion and had tried to scuttle it diplomatically a month earlier. In 2011, the diplomatic picture is turned upside-down: France has led the charge to intervene in Libya to protect civilians from Moammar Gadhafi's rampage, and President Obama is the reluctant warrior, insisting that every step must have international backing and deferring to the Europeans to lead.
NEWS
March 12, 2011 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
CULT LEADERS are the pied-pipers of America, leading the outcast, the despondent, and sometimes the highly intelligent off into the dark, isolated fringes of society. And then there's Rick Alan Ross, poking around in that darkness with a flashlight. From his eclectic office in a former cracker factory in Trenton, Ross, 58, runs the Rick A. Ross Institute, a nonprofit Internet archive on "destructive cults" and "controversial groups and movements. " Attorneys, universities and the media often go to Ross for explanations when seemingly benign groups go off the rails, and parents turn to him when their children fall under a cult's spell.
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By NATALIE POMPILIO, pompiln@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
Lying flat on his back in Thomas Jefferson University Hospital last night, 16-year-old Mazzerati Mitchell said he didn't want to take medications that could help heal his bruised spine after a wrestling injury. His parents, Vermell and Jack Mitchell, are on the same page. The family believes in herbal medicines, natural healing, noninvasive measures. But the hospital and Delaware County don't agree. That's why the Mitchells got a letter yesterday from Delaware County's Department of Human Services' Office of Children and Youth Services saying that their son had been taken into protective custody.
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