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Intervention

ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2011 | ByAMY KAUFMAN, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Leif Garrett didn't want to go to rehab - or at least not "Celebrity Rehab. " "I didn't want to have a camera stuck in my face while I was trying to kick," said Garrett, the 1970s teen idol once as famous for his singing and acting as his mane of blond hair. "I thought, 'It's nobody's freaking business.' But I finally came to the realization: It's everybody's business, because it's been in the papers. Instead of paying to go to rehab, why not get paid for it? And show the world that I am no longer using?"
NEWS
December 10, 2009
The efforts to reform the Luzerne County courts may not go far enough to rid the legal system of the corrupt culture that has taken root there. The public is still reeling from details that continue to emerge involving two judges indicted for taking nearly $3 million in kickbacks in return for shipping hundreds teens to private juvenile prisons for minor offenses. Now, unrelated charges have been lodged against a third judge, Michael T. Toole, 49. Toole faces tax and fraud charges stemming from allegations he sat on a civil case after a plaintiff's lawyer treated him to the use of a house at the Shore.
NEWS
November 1, 2009 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The police officers were hearing voices - confusing, rambling, aggressive, angry, mean voices - in their heads. For 45 minutes, they had to perform simple tasks while trying to ignore the cacophony piping into their ears from MP3 players. Focusing was virtually impossible. For the two dozen officers in a classroom at the Philadelphia Police Academy last week, the hearing-voices exercise was aimed at a better understanding of people with mental illness and how to interact with them.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Those with big stakes in the housing industry appear to be champing at the bit to declare the recession over and recovery just around the corner. Not as convinced are economists and observers outside the industry, who do not see a few months of comparatively positive sales and construction numbers as a guarantee that the worst is behind us. Several reasons appear consistently in the skeptics' analyses: the tax credit for first-time buyers, interest-rate volatility, government intervention, continuing unemployment, and the steady stream of foreclosures and mortgage delinquencies nationwide.
NEWS
August 30, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Whether buying into an Atlantic City nightclub or throwing the first pitch at a Phillies-Mets game or spinning and mixing records for celebrity friends and fans, all Adam Goldstein - DJ AM - was trying to do after surviving a horrendous 2008 airplane crash was live his life and stay clean. But Goldstein, a 36-year-old Philadelphia native who grew up in Rittenhouse Square, was found dead Friday evening in his Manhattan apartment, where, police said, they found a crack pipe and prescription pills.
NEWS
May 9, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Main Line dentist accused of dumping medical waste off the Jersey Shore last summer will have to stand trial. Thomas McFarland Jr., 60, who operated his practice from his Wynnewood home and owns a summer residence in the Avalon Manor section of Middle Township, yesterday was denied admission to a pre-trial intervention program. Acceptance would have allowed him to avoid court and eliminated the possibility of jail time. Eventually, his record would have been wiped clean.
NEWS
March 20, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Main Line dentist accused of dumping medical waste off the Jersey Shore in August will not be permitted to enter a pretrial intervention program if the state Attorney General's Office has its way. At a hearing yesterday in state Superior Court in Cape May County, Deputy Attorney General Edward Bonanno declined to give specific reasons why his office opposed allowing Thomas McFarland, 59, of Wynnewood, into the program for first-time offenders....
NEWS
May 18, 2008 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a crackdown on crime continues in Philadelphia, city officials are concerned it will only exacerbate a crisis in city prisons. Driven, in part, by a growing backlog of criminal cases, the daily jail count on April 19 reached 9,334 - a record in the city prison system's 320 years. And there's fear that a surge in arrests will put the city on a fast track to surpassing 10,000. The influx of inmates is expensive, draining tax dollars away from recreation programs, pothole repairs, and other general city services.
NEWS
December 23, 2007 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They had reasons for breaking curfew: They wanted to grab a late-night snack, visit a friend, or hang out on a street corner. But in Camden, one of America's most violent and crime-plagued cities, a simple trip to a convenience store can land them in harm's way or put them with the wrong crowd, and officials want to change that. To protect its youngest residents, the city is enforcing a decades-old curfew law with a new tactic. Rather than punish youths, authorities try to find out why they are loitering late at night, warn them about the dangers they could encounter on the streets, and offer solutions to help them follow the rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2007 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Here we go again. Another Irish play about another bunch of drunks. And another Conor McPherson play about spooky events and divine intervention. Another kind of intervention might be in order here, but The Seafarer, sometimes funny and sometimes sad, features a fine cast that can knock it back with the best of them. The production has transferred from London's National Theatre. Beneath all the crashing around and the unprintable-here language, this is a Christmas play, intending to warm the cockles of our hearts.
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