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Intimacy

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NEWS
February 15, 2001
Parallel parking on South Street doesn't seem quite so difficult anymore. Not when you consider the maneuvering done this week by NASA scientists, who landed a spacecraft the size of a car on an asteroid 196 million miles from Earth. Landing the NEAR (Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous) Shoemaker spacecraft on the Eros 433 asteroid's surface was a bonus, since the legless craft was built for orbiting the asteroid and collecting information - not for putting down roots. It was a redeeming moment, too, for the space agency, which has suffered a series of bungled missions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2001 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
"It was a vision I had from watching MTV Unplugged, where it's almost like someone is playing in your living room," says Richard Kardon, explaining the impetus for opening the Point, a folk club and cafe in Bryn Mawr. "Everyone is sitting on sofas and easy chairs and the performer is not on a stage, but playing right in the middle of the crowd. " True to his vision, no table at the Point is more than four tables from the stage, which has hosted folk-circuit luminaries such as Dan Hicks, Graham Parker and the Monkees' Peter Tork since opening two years ago. It is pure coincidence, Kardon says, that the piece of real estate he had sought for years just happened to be two doors down from the site of the old Main Point, a like-minded coffeehouse and folk venue that operated from 1966 to 1981.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1998 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A cabaret series began Nov. 6 at the Ritz-Carlton in Center City. Though the Ritz's Grill Room lacks the jewel-box splendor of the Bellevue's Barrymore Room, its muted Georgian elegance makes up for it with a drawing-room ambience that is both oddly staid and cozy. KT Sullivan - who has appeared on Broadway in revivals of Gentleman Prefer Blondes and with Sting in Threepenny Opera - opened the new series. And a perfect choice she is to do it. For the second of four consecutive Fridays, Sullivan strung together opalescent moments as if they were a strand of uncultured pearls.
NEWS
October 27, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Belgian filmmaker Chantal Akerman proves herself a triple threat (she writes! she directs! she stars!) in her curious 1974 feature debut, Je Tu Il Elle (I You He She), receiving its Philadelphia premiere run today and tomorrow. As in her domestic epic Jeanne Dielman (1975), the movie for which she is justifiably celebrated, Je Tu Il Elle tells its story in long takes, the camera at a discreet distance from the characters - and equally distant from their simmering emotions. Naturally, the "I" of the title is played by Akerman.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1995 | By Deni Kasrel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Looking Back, Dancing Forward, staged by Ariel Weiss Holyst and Karen H. Carlson's Two to Go Productions at the Community Education Center over the weekend, consisted of three original works. Each was self-contained, still certain themes pervaded, in particular the need for intimacy and mutual support. The program's opener, "Triple Trouble," incorporated mime, dance and dialogue and spun off the classic love-triangle motif. It begins with Carlson, Susan Chase and Bill George as a cellist, pianist and violinist attempting to play Beethoven's Triple Concerto.
NEWS
January 19, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Even if you didn't know that Mi and L'au were a couple - so went the hype preceding their appearance Tuesday night at World Cafe Live - you'd have to guess at something going on between them. You could tell by the way they gazed at each other during brief interludes, the way their reed-thin bodies huddled throughout their creeping, intimate ballads, songs so subtle and sparse they seemed an afterthought. You just wanted to tell the Finnish Mi and French L'au - ever so quietly - to get a room.
LIVING
January 12, 1986 | By Susan Morse, Special to The Inquirer
It began as a quarrel about the two companions' professional roles, and gave way to a profound and unexpected rupture. For a long month, each kept up a brittle silence that mocked their 10 or more years of confidences. Finally, Diane Rehm, a Washington radio talk show host, and her estranged friend, Jane Holmes Dixon, an Episcopal priest, agreed to try the unconventional - to review the blow-up together with a therapist. "We did go," said Rehm, 49. "For the most part, the therapist listened.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Call it brave, call it embarrassing, call it obscene, call it foolhardy, call it unnecessary, call it real, or call it the opposite of real: pretentious. Watching Mark Rylance and Kerry Fox having sex - brutal, un-pretty, thumping-around-on-the-basement-floor sex - is, whatever it is, a disconcerting experience. It is also, in Intimacy, Patrice Chereau's grim film of sex-that-becomes-love (kind of) between a man and a woman in a dreary London brightened by splashes of red and green, fascinating.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1993 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's hard not to wonder how much more insighful Jake's Women might have been had it been written by one of Jake's women - instead of by Jake. Jake is, of course, a stand-in for Neil Simon, who once again mines his own past for inspiration. Nor is the irony of this unsatisfying exercise in self- analysis lost on us: In this Walnut Street Theatre production, the playwright condemns his character for writing about his life rather than living it. He does this by writing about his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
My Chemical Romance, New Jersey's infamous glam emo band, definitely turned operatic with its finest and latest album, The Black Parade. Between its doom-laden conceptualism and its orchestrated roar, singer/lyricist Gerard Way and the rest of "Chem Ro" have grown grand while essaying the decline of the human body. My Chemical Romance, considered alternative pop rock, once nursed a darker intimacy when on the independent Eyeball label. "I ache for the smaller shows, the power of just 50 people in one room," says Chem Ro guitarist Frank Iero.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
There are only seven people in the world: Benjamin and Rachel Camp, Melissa Krodman, Makato Hirano, Jenna Horton, Mark McCloughan, and Aram Aghazarian. I could forgive a cynical audience member who drew that conclusion after seeing the 2016 iteration of The Sincerity Project . In 2014, Team Sunshine Performance Corp. launched TSP as a performance piece to occur every two years for 24 years, with 13 total installments. The same performers would regroup, recreate, and, as the second staging showed, repurpose the original intent.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
By Grazie Pozo Christie Pope Francis' recent apostolic exhortation, Amoris Laetitia , is a rich and complex document about marriage and family - both the noble Christian ideals and the troubled and broken ways we too often experience them. Many have interpreted the exhortation's merciful tone toward Catholics who are in "irregular" situations as a seismic shift in Church teaching about sexuality and marriage (toward a "modern" sexually liberal outlook). They have been brought back to reality by Archbishop Charles Chaput of Philadelphia, who has published pastoral guidelines on Amoris for the priests of his parish.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I have been married for almost three years to a woman who refuses to share the same bed with me. It started on our honeymoon when, after having sex, she chose to sleep in a different bed whenever there were two beds in the room. She's in her late 40s and had never been married before. We have been intimate only twice in the last year. Moreover, she doesn't let me sit next to her while we watch TV, and there is no kissing, no touching, no affection of any kind, physical or verbal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: I caught my husband cheating. We've started couple's counseling. The counselor told him he needed to let me ask all my questions about the affair, and we had that conversation at home. I do feel better now, but he was evasive on a few of the questions: "Did you tell her you loved her?" (he dodged, unconvincingly), and, "Who initiated the affair?" (he doesn't know I know it was a lie to say she did). How much of a red flag is this?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fate hasn't exactly been kind to Percival Wills (Leon Cain) or Steven Ray (Steve Mouzakis), two lost souls mired in despair who meet and befriend each other in The Suicide Theory , a razor-dark buddy dramedy from Australian director Dru Brown. Percival lost his will to live three years earlier when his lover, Chris, was savagely murdered. His depression and feelings of worthlessness reach an all-time nadir when he comes to learn from hard experience that he's such a failure, he can't even kill himself properly.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Rob Garfield knows he is fighting an uphill battle. He has written an important book about men, friendship, and emotional intimacy, and he knows most men aren't inclined to buy such books. In fact, most books are bought by women, and unless they are especially concerned about the welfare of the men in their lives, they, too, may not be as responsive as they should to a book with the title Breaking the Male Code - Unlocking the Power of Friendship: Overcoming Male Isolation for a Longer, Happier Life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
"Public intimacy" is social media's contribution to our oxymoronic life, but guitarists have grappled with the concept since the first one faced an audience. The instrument draws the heart into the fingertips, which bare the greatest intimacy in a whisper of sound. Place the guitar in front of an orchestra of 60, and logic - and intimacy - may vanish completely. Amplification has balanced those forces, particularly in recordings, and the guitar has gathered a bundle of concertos that revel in the sonorities of plucked strings, exuberant brass, and richly carpeted strings.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Spike Jonze's films to date - Being John Malkovich (1999) and Adaptation (2002), from screenplays by Charlie Kaufman , and Where the Wild Things Are (2009), from the Maurice Sendak classic picture book - are marked by deadpan humor tinged with surreal whimsy. (Next elevator stop: Floor 71/2, where all the workers stoop and hunch over.) But there's an underlying sadness there, too. In Her , which Jonze also wrote and which opens Friday in area theaters, that sadness is palpable.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: Six years ago, I got involved with a guy. It was brief, intense and ended terribly, with me devastated and hurt. I never received any acknowledgement that he'd been so callous. Anyway, I wouldn't get involved with him again if he wanted to - not out of spite, just lack of interest - but I find myself resentful of his apparent happiness. He was recently married, and I keep thinking, "Why does he get to have that happiness and I don't?" This, coming from an existentialist, who doesn't believe in things like karma.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: Do you think I have to disclose to my friends, relatives, dates, etc., that I'm on antidepressants? It's likely to change my relationships in some ways (I hope for the better), so I feel these people deserve an explanation, but I'm afraid I'm going to feel judged, whether or not anyone is actually judging me. What do you think? Answer: Friends, no, relatives, no, dates, no ... until you get to the point where you think things are on a serious, committed path.
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