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Intolerance

NEWS
June 25, 2008
It's not surprising that State Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R., Butler) would spew angry words about a Muslim group on the House floor in Harrisburg. Metcalfe's past work includes lobbying against a state grant to the Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corp. because it tries to attract - gasp - gays and lesbians to visit the city. He is making a career out of disapproving of others. But it was surprising that one man's intolerance would force his colleagues to shelve an innocuous resolution intended to welcome an annual gathering of Muslims in the state capital.
NEWS
May 12, 2008 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Barry Morrison listened with a modest smile last week as one speaker after another extolled his "courage" and "passion" and "integrity. " "He is a hero," Mayor Nutter told the audience of 500 at the Crystal Tea Room. "I love you, Barry, for being my friend," said an emotional Tom Martinez, a former "white supremacist from Kensington. " It sounded like a farewell party, but no. Morrison, executive director of the regional Anti-Defamation League, was celebrating his 30th anniversary at the ADL and has no plans to leave soon.
NEWS
March 4, 2008
Working with Temple University officials, Philadelphia police took decisive action by charging four Temple students with the senseless beating of the grandson of a Holocaust survivor. The attackers reportedly shouted anti-Semitic slurs before pummeling the 23-year-old college student, a visitor to the North Broad Street campus who attends Penn State University. While the victim suffered a broken nose and orbital bone in his face, the hopeful news is that he is expected to recover fully, his father told a campus meeting on the attack late last week.
NEWS
January 18, 2008 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Strawberry Mansion High School disciplined students involved in a cafeteria melee captured on video that was posted on YouTube.com last month, but did not report the fight to the district until yesterday. Likewise, school administrators did not follow the district's discipline policy in two other recent incidents - one involving a box cutter and the other an assault on a school police officer. "We will not tolerate failure to report serious incidents or failure to report them in a timely fashion," Tom Brady, the district's interim chief executive officer, said in a statement yesterday.
NEWS
January 18, 2008 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Strawberry Mansion High School disciplined students involved in a cafeteria melee captured on video that was posted on YouTube.com last month, but did not report the fight to the district until yesterday. Likewise, school administrators did not follow the district's discipline policy in two other recent incidents - one involving a box cutter and the other an assault on a school police officer. "We will not tolerate failure to report serious incidents or failure to report them in a timely fashion," Tom Brady, the district's interim chief executive officer, said in a statement yesterday.
NEWS
December 10, 2007 | By Ryan McCarl
I was thrilled to learn that The Golden Compass, the first book in Philip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy, was going to be released as a movie on Friday. I read the trilogy first in middle school and again in high school, and it was my favorite story for a long time. It is filled with imagination and erudition, and it is a significant cut above the vast majority of works aimed at young adults. But the story's greatest strength - its infusion with ideas - is as much a threat to pundits and "protect-the-children" types as it is a joy to readers.
NEWS
October 18, 2007 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
I already know what's going to happen after I write this column. Someone is going to say: "Why did you waste space condemning the latest drivel from the mouth of Ann Coulter? Don't you know she only says these outrageous things to promote her books?" Why reward her with attention? Ann Coulter plays the news media like Louis Armstrong once played his cornet. She is a virtuoso of stage-managed controversy. So there's something to be said for refusing to play along, for ignoring her in the hope that she will just go away.
NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Christopher Paslay
Every semester, I require my 10th grade English classes to write a persuasive essay on same-sex marriage. For seven years, the responses I received were one-sided. My students argued that gay marriage was wrong, backwards, something normal people didn't do. Then, around 2002, when organizations such as the Gay-Straight Alliance started to gain support and the Philadelphia School District's anti-discrimination policies began to take hold, I started to notice more compassion in my students' essays.
NEWS
October 26, 2006
RE STEPHEN Staedtler's response to Erika Garnett-Woodson's Oct. 12 letter on Gay History Month: I agreed with some of his questioning whether gays are as persecuted as blacks were during the civil-rights struggles. But gays are not simply denied equal pay for equal work by both federal and state governments (due to inequities on taxes and benefits); they are sometimes denied custody of their own children. They face resentment, intolerance, or hatred and violence. People go so far as to deny them their very identity, saying that they have a disease, a "disorder" (so says the pope)
NEWS
October 13, 2006
A PUBLIC-SCHOOL student looking for a social-studies field project should have stopped by the School District of Philadelphia auditorium Wednesday. It was a perfect lesson in intolerance. At the School Reform Commission meeting on Wednesday, one topic on the list for for public comment was the district's 2006-2007 school calendar, which highlights October as Gay and Lesbian History Month. It's surprising and confounding that an issue that calls for tolerance and understanding would be the victim of intolerance - and fear.
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