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Intramural Sports

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NEWS
May 1, 1996 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After being blasted by parents and teachers upset with proposed budget cuts two weeks ago, Upper Merion Area school board President William Del Collo and member Joseph Battisto came to Monday's public meeting with recommendations to save 11 programs. The high school's writing and math labs, the middle school's camping trips, and intramural sports were saved from the chopping block under a new plan that calls for about $900,000 in cuts, instead of the $1.2 million that had been contemplated.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer correspondent Robert F. O'Neill contributed to this article
It is October, but in the hallways of Sharon Hill Elementary School, it looks like July. No spooky Halloween decorations on the walls. No construction paper cutouts of vowels or days of the week or famous Americans. Just clean, glossy yellow paint and empty bulletin boards. Then a bell rings and kids pour sudden life into the grim halls with their candy-colored clothes and giggles. Another school day in the Southeast Delco School District's year of living miserably is over.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Never mind the blow that GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.'s decision to leave Center City has dealt Philadelphia's already vacancy-battered commercial landlords. What about the effect on the pharmaceutical company's 1,300 employees, who will move by 2012's end from a bustling downtown location to the Navy Yard? Talk about culture shock. Their new digs will be part of a tranquil, suburbanlike corporate campus along the Delaware River at the city's southern edge - the towers they now occupy on 16th Street, between Vine and Race Streets, but a speck, if that, on the distant skyline.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Redskins vs. Redskins and Redskins vs. Redskins could be the lineup all season for Neshaminy middle school teams next year. Sound boring? Some student athletes think so. Under a new school board proposal, the district's four middle schools may find themselves playing one another if the district ends its formal interscholastic sports program and switches to an expanded intramural program. School board members say a new intramural sports program could save the district money and reduce a proposed budget increase for the 1997-98 academic year.
NEWS
May 25, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Erin Pizzuto's science grade dropped to a 65 last marking period, she realized that if she didn't turn things around, she couldn't play on the junior high softball team anymore. With some encouragement from her coach, Pizzuto, an Edgewood Junior High School seventh grader from Winslow, has worked hard to pull her science grade up so she can don her green jersey and step up to the plate alongside her teammates. But next year, if Pizzuto's science grade starts to slip, there will be less to encourage her to work harder.
NEWS
September 26, 2001 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andrew M. King, 42, a bond trader who was dedicated to his job, devoted to his family, and passionate about golf, is presumed to have been killed in the Sept. 11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. Mr. King had been a resident of Princeton for about nine years after living in Swarthmore and Center City Philadelphia. Mr. King, a trader specializing in Asian markets for Cantor Fitzgerald Securities, was on the 104th floor of the North Tower when it was struck by hijacked American Airlines Flight 11. He was able to call his wife, Judy, telling her: "Something has hit the building, and I will call you when I get out. " His body has not been found.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A proposal that student athletes in the Octorara district pay a $40 sports fee has come under fire from two members of the local school board who say it is too high. The $40 fee was recommended by school administrators and would apply to most of the district's 575 students who play on middle and high school teams. "I was a little surprised and didn't really know where it ($40 fee) came from," said Octorara Area School Board President Samuel Ganow. "Somewhere things got twisted around," said Board Vice President Wayne Thomas.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Samuel F. Trifiletti , 75, a longtime Glassboro resident who served on the borough's Board of Education for nearly two decades and helped establish Glassboro High School's Athletic Hall of Fame, died Tuesday at his home. Mr. Trifiletti served on the school board from 1972 through 1990. A retired insurance agent, he served on the board's insurance and budget committee, where his expertise in financial matters was valued, as well as on its public relations committee throughout his tenure, according to Superintendent of Schools Nicholas Mitcho.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
Fighting winds strong enough to blow over a small building, Michael Byard, a senior on Benjamin Franklin High School's football team, jumps into the air after a hopelessly out-of-bounds pass during a game against Thomas A. Edison High School. The football whizzes past him. Byard's lanky body, already in motion, crashes to the ground. He slides for about five feet along rain-soaked grass and onto a paved running track. The body skid must have hurt, but it doesn't faze Byard.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Tomorrow night, the Personnel and Internal Matters Committee of the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District will decide whether to recommend spending $20,000 for a ninth-grade sports program. While many parents say the money is a small price to pay to give ninth graders a chance to compete with ninth graders from other school districts, others say that intramural sports might be a better way for the district to spend its money in tight economic times. "I am in favor of any program that encourages more student participation in school programs," said John Maher, principal of Unionville High School, where ninth graders attend.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 21, 2013
With the arrival of another fall semester, college officials wisely are renewing their annual pitches to steer students clear of risky binge-drinking - and some with a new twist. Binge-drinking leaves thousands of victims in its wake annually from accidental injury and death as well as sexual assault. It also can plant the seeds that lead to long-term problem-drinking. Colleges' anti-binging strategies typically include education and media campaigns, limiting or banning on-campus drinking, hosting alcohol-free events and late-night activities - even opening dining halls later to offer fortifying snacks so fewer students drink on an empty stomach.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Julie Shaw and Daily News Staff Writer
With heightened interest in all things Mormon these days and construction of a temple here expected to start this year, Eagles coach Andy Reid hosted a community symposium Sunday night to field questions on just "Who are the Mormons?"   At a panel discussion at the Broomall meetinghouse of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Reid said that there has been an "unprecedented increase in curiosity about Mormons," which has "opened a lot of misconceptions about Mormonism.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Never mind the blow that GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.'s decision to leave Center City has dealt Philadelphia's already vacancy-battered commercial landlords. What about the effect on the pharmaceutical company's 1,300 employees, who will move by 2012's end from a bustling downtown location to the Navy Yard? Talk about culture shock. Their new digs will be part of a tranquil, suburbanlike corporate campus along the Delaware River at the city's southern edge - the towers they now occupy on 16th Street, between Vine and Race Streets, but a speck, if that, on the distant skyline.
NEWS
September 26, 2001 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Andrew M. King, 42, a bond trader who was dedicated to his job, devoted to his family, and passionate about golf, is presumed to have been killed in the Sept. 11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. Mr. King had been a resident of Princeton for about nine years after living in Swarthmore and Center City Philadelphia. Mr. King, a trader specializing in Asian markets for Cantor Fitzgerald Securities, was on the 104th floor of the North Tower when it was struck by hijacked American Airlines Flight 11. He was able to call his wife, Judy, telling her: "Something has hit the building, and I will call you when I get out. " His body has not been found.
SPORTS
March 24, 2000 | By Rich Fisher, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Rowan lacrosse coach Mary Marino chuckled when asked about her players' competing in intramural sports. She said simply, "I discourage it. " With good reason. Two weeks into Rowan's preseason last year, sophomore Kelly McAleer was in a heated intramural basketball game. McAleer, who led the Profs with 40 goals in her freshman year, was encouraged to run down an opposing player who was on a breakaway late in the contest. "They're all yelling, 'Get her, Mac!' So I start sprinting down the court," McAleer said.
NEWS
March 8, 1999 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The annual ritual of preparing athletic fields for spring sports programs is volatile in this midsize township, with its 30 municipally owned fields, 2,000 young athletes, and a recreation-minded municipal council. Just last week, the council was split along gender and partisan lines in a vote over a $92,000 contract for lighting on two new boys' baseball fields at Medford's $3.3 million outdoor sports complex. For four years, the five council members have fought over details of the township-operated complex, which is for youths up to age 18. At Wednesday's council meeting, the two councilwomen, who also are the only Democrats, were feeling less than sportswoman-like.
NEWS
May 25, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Erin Pizzuto's science grade dropped to a 65 last marking period, she realized that if she didn't turn things around, she couldn't play on the junior high softball team anymore. With some encouragement from her coach, Pizzuto, an Edgewood Junior High School seventh grader from Winslow, has worked hard to pull her science grade up so she can don her green jersey and step up to the plate alongside her teammates. But next year, if Pizzuto's science grade starts to slip, there will be less to encourage her to work harder.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Redskins vs. Redskins and Redskins vs. Redskins could be the lineup all season for Neshaminy middle school teams next year. Sound boring? Some student athletes think so. Under a new school board proposal, the district's four middle schools may find themselves playing one another if the district ends its formal interscholastic sports program and switches to an expanded intramural program. School board members say a new intramural sports program could save the district money and reduce a proposed budget increase for the 1997-98 academic year.
NEWS
May 1, 1996 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After being blasted by parents and teachers upset with proposed budget cuts two weeks ago, Upper Merion Area school board President William Del Collo and member Joseph Battisto came to Monday's public meeting with recommendations to save 11 programs. The high school's writing and math labs, the middle school's camping trips, and intramural sports were saved from the chopping block under a new plan that calls for about $900,000 in cuts, instead of the $1.2 million that had been contemplated.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Samuel F. Trifiletti , 75, a longtime Glassboro resident who served on the borough's Board of Education for nearly two decades and helped establish Glassboro High School's Athletic Hall of Fame, died Tuesday at his home. Mr. Trifiletti served on the school board from 1972 through 1990. A retired insurance agent, he served on the board's insurance and budget committee, where his expertise in financial matters was valued, as well as on its public relations committee throughout his tenure, according to Superintendent of Schools Nicholas Mitcho.
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