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Invention

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NEWS
May 18, 1986 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many great inventions, it began with a small, simple problem. It seemed that Steven Hrize just couldn't keep his mittens and gloves together - an easy feat for an 8-year-old, and one that didn't make mom very happy. "My mom would yell at me and I was always late for school, so I came up with this," Steven said, gesturing to the "glove catcher," an invention designed to enable him to hang on to his mittens. The invention is a handy rack of colorful clothespins that are attached to freshly varnished boards, which dangle by chains.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
When Kelly Forsythe's 18-month-old cousin, Sandra, caught a cold last year, she started coughing. But the baby couldn't suck on a cough drop because she was so small she might choke. So Kelly, 12, of Gloucester Township, watched as Sandra's mother gave the baby a lollipop. From that observation came one of those ideas so simple everybody wonders why nobody had thought of it before. Kelly created a national prize-winning invention, the cough pop, a cough drop on a lollipop stick.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No matter what, Rusty the dog only lets guys named George with candy visit Pete and Thelma Mae Novak's little red-brick rowhouse. "That's George, Rusty. He's got candy for you," Pete Novak, 75, says to calm the growling, barrel-shaped mutt as a visitor - any visitor - enters the front door, under the faded green awning. Rusty's rotund physique would suggest that he has eaten a lot of candy, and maybe even a few guys named George. But he seems satisfied with the explanation, suddenly quits yapping and flops onto the living-room floor at Thelma Mae's feet.
NEWS
December 29, 2012
Ray Collins, a singer whose dispute with one guitarist led him to hire another, Frank Zappa, with whom he would go on to form the avant-garde rock group the Mothers of Invention, died Monday in Pomona, Calif. The death of Mr. Collins, who was in his mid-70s, followed his admission to Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center a week earlier for cardiac arrest, according to local news accounts. Mr. Collins entered the national spotlight with the Mothers of Invention, an outlet for Zappa's unique sense of humor and challenging, unorthodox compositions.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
Between eating chicken parmigiana and sipping black coffee, Frank Pocius spoke with passion about his recent invention at a booth at Omer's Diner on Route 130. "If it has this kind of impact on a small scale, then imagine what it would do across the country," said Pocius, 45, of Cinnaminson. As an algebra teacher at Moorestown, Pocius has been searching for a dozen years for a better way to teach algebra. Using his hands and eyebrows to emphasize his points, Pocius described how he changed the study of algebra from a "sometimes debilitating" ordeal into a pleasurable learning process that could give students the tools to understand far more difficult subjects such as physics and calculus.
NEWS
November 27, 2011
By Kirsten Kaschock Coffee House Press. 286 pp. $16. Reviewed by Alison Barker By the end of Kirsten Kaschock's debut novel Sleight , questions abound. How does she do that - create a novel like a set of Russian nesting dolls, each whimsical creation housing a new wonder? And, can someone please do the performance art she invents - called "sleight" - in the real world? Most important: Why can't more novels use fairy tale to ask big questions? In Sleight we encounter part-living, part-inanimate objects called Needs and Souls; artists who apprentice as "hands" in secluded farmhouses; a girl's imaginary friend who is her late grandfather (as a young child)
BUSINESS
April 18, 2011
Bob Hoeveler is 80 and has bum knees. In other words, the grandfather of five has excuse enough to quit mowing his lawn. Not that that's happening. "No man that has a tractor will ever give it up," Hoeveler declared during an interview last week, his John Deere LX280 parked nearby. That tractor is not only why he still mows his acre in East Bradford, Chester County, but also why he's still working. Hoeveler has just launched a small business from his basement, peddling a product he invented that he hopes will be considered a must-have by other riding-mower devotees: A stick-on container called the Tractor Holster.
SPORTS
December 26, 2001 | By Bob Ford INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lou had many good qualities, but he clearly could not shoot a basketball. This was clear, on occasion, to Lou himself, and it was definitely clear to the guys who played on the other teams. But it was clearest of all to Andrew Kirkpatrick, who would set up his playground friend for open shots only to see those shots thud on the backboard or clang noisily against the side of the rim. "He used to rag on me all the time," Lou Valente said, "and then he came around with this crazy rubber band.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
When Gary Shockley started cutting apart his electric guitar two years ago, he had a dream. Yearning to follow in the footsteps of rock stars such as Jon Bon Jovi and Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page, Shockley - a guitarist who had never built anything before, let alone a musical instrument - designed and put together a new type of "double" guitar, an electric guitar grafted onto an acoustic guitar. Today, Shockley's dream is one step closer to becoming a reality. The U.S. Patent Office approved his request for a patent two weeks ago pending its finding any existing patents for the same invention.
NEWS
June 1, 1995 | By Ana M. Alaya, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Jerome Lemelson, whose inventions range from the Velcro dart toy to cancer- detection equipment, unveiled one of his newest ideas yesterday: a $10.4 million cash gift to the Smithsonian Institution to start programs devoted to invention and innovation. Lemelson's gift, the largest bestowed by an individual during the institution's 149-year history, will be used to create a center at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History for educational programs, exhibits and research related to invention.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2016
By Ned Rauch-Mannino The National Museum of Industrial History, the original Smithsonian affiliate located on the successfully redeveloped former brownfield that was once Bethlehem Steel, opened its doors this month. Dedicated to recognizing America's industrial heritage, features include the 1876 Centennial collection, on loan from the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, crowning achievements of Industrial Revolution ingenuity. The first-made, last-produced, oldest-surviving, and longest-running inventions in U.S. history are among the institution's additional 200 artifacts on display.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
Ballet X ends its 10th anniversary season at the Wilma Theater with two world premieres: Matthew Neenan's Identity Without Attribute and Bonzi , by the Colombo-Belgian choreographer Annabelle Lopez Ochoa. Both works feature video design by Klip Collective, a Philadelphia-based group known for its large-scale visual projections. Identity reaffirms Neenan's choreographic inventiveness. Here, he contrasts meditative movements for lead dancer Caili Quan with quick, jittery motions and unexpected segues - from entrechats to jazzy hip circles, plus gloriously quirky duets.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
With so much musical hardware on the Perelman Theater stage, is there still room for a Prism Quartet? That was a valid question last week, and it will be again at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, for the 32-year-old Philadelphia saxophone quartet, which has an appetite for collaborating with ensembles requiring much stage real estate. Last week, they played with the modern percussion ensemble So Percussion. On Saturday, they will perform with a Los Angeles group known simply as Partch, which plays versions of the exotic instruments invented by maverick composer Harry Partch (1901-74)
SPORTS
April 13, 2016 | Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
Ed Snider never played hockey as a kid, never watched the game until he was well into adulthood. But the next time someone calls Johnny Gaudreau "Johnny Hockey," the next time some Rangers fan raves about Mike Richter, the next time one Philadelphia fan chides another or a member of the media for not understanding the game – their game – they do so with an unwitting nod to the man who introduced hockey to the Delaware Valley 50 years ago and who...
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | Joe Sixpack
A lot of bad decisions are made in bars. Dancing with your pants on your head . . . Bingeing on a second cheesesteak . . . Drunk dialing . . . Sex with your ex . . . But, c'mon, let's give barrooms their due, for without them there'd be no libraries, no credit cards and no NASCAR. Here are 10 great things that were born in bars. 1. The United States Marine Corps Jarheads, who have been known to pound a few beers, take special pride that their beloved USMC was founded at Tun Tavern near Philadelphia's waterfront on Nov. 10, 1775.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Cedar channels, iron drive shafts, brass tappers, and assorted gears, plates, and pulleys were scattered all over the attic of a cranberry-sorting house at the Birches Farm in Tabernacle. But Mark Ehlenfeldt knew what to look for. He'd been studying photographs, schematic diagrams, and patent drawings of a South Jersey invention he hopes to rebuild: an ingenious, if somewhat high-maintenance, cranberry sorter (or separator). Last seen in operation sometime around 1960 at the Birches, the machine no longer exists - except as hundreds of large and small parts Ehlenfeldt recovered from the attic in October and November.
SPORTS
November 16, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
SAN ANTONIO - The 76ers are easy targets right now. ESPN, sports-talk radio, newspapers, and websites are all taking swings at a team destined to win fewer than 20 games for the third consecutive season. There is talk about how their tanking for a third season is a disgrace. There are mentions that general manager Sam Hinkie is being greedy, since he already has young standouts to build with in Nerlens Noel and Jahlil Okafor. Media and fans say it's time to fill out the roster and stop prolonging the embarrassment.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Curtis invented Instagram?! Jamie Lee Curtis  was sending Instagram-type photo-messages long before that social site was launched in 2010. Curtis tells Entertainment Weekly her blog, iphoneys ( www.iphoneys.blogspot.com/ ), was really the first to employ the concept. Curtis and her friends swapped images and messages on the site all the time, says the  Scream Queens  star. "Funny enough, really the day that Instagram was announced is the day that they stop," Curtis says, "because as soon as that was available, that's all we did. " The 'Daily Show' is ready The Daily Show 's new host, Trevor Noah, is ready to relaunch his version of the Comedy Central talk show, premiering Monday.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
FROM TIME to time, I like to check in with the U.S. Patent Office for a progress report on the exciting field of beer inventions. Over the years, we've seen brilliant ideas, ranging from tooth protectors on beer bottles to beer pong tables that keep your beer cold. Honestly, if we could channel some of that ingenuity into, say, theoretical aerodynamics, we'd have those rocket packs by now. So, what's new? Here's a handful of recent patent applications. * Shotgun Accessible Beer Can (#2015-0183547)
NEWS
August 28, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two local universities can claim fashion diva status - they made Business of Fashion's inaugural "Global Fashion School Rankings. " Drexel University placed 10th in undergraduate fashion education, while Philadelphia University came in 16th. In graduate school education, Philadelphia University showed up again, in 10th place. That prompted the New York Times' Vanessa Friedman to quip in her blog, "On the Runway": "Philly: hotbed of fashion invention. Who knew?" Business of Fashion, an industry website, said it looked at 60 data points from 24 participating schools, surveys completed by students and alumni, and input from other experts.
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