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Invention

NEWS
May 10, 1999 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The idea came from the news, a simple reminder to change your smoke-detector batteries when moving your clocks ahead or back in the spring and fall. At that moment, Jordan Wompierski, a 10-year-old always on the prowl for a new invention, had a breakthrough: Why not create a clock with a built-in smoke detector? From that idea came the Life-Time, a clock-and-detector-in-one devised by Jordan and his fifth-grade classmate Catherine Horan. The pair took first place at a regional invention competition, called Students Inventions Through Education, held in Pomona on April 28. Next month, their work will be submitted in Invent America, a program run by the U.S. Patent Model Foundation in Alexandria, Va. This is just the latest chapter in Jordan's career as a young inventor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010
GIMME FIVE "The Last Song" wasn't a blockbuster, but it was Greg Kinnear's highest-grossing movie in a while. His last five outings: 1. "The Last Song. " (2010) $62 million. 2. "Green Zone. " (2010) $35 million. Plays a Pentagon Special Intelligence officer in Baghdad. 3. "Flash of Genius. " (2008) $4 million. Kinnear takes on Detroit over the invention of intermittent windshield wipers. 4. "Ghost Town. " (2008) $13 million. He's a ghost, meddling in his widow's affairs.
NEWS
November 15, 1992 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Danielle Sano hates bread crusts - so she's doing something about it. As part of a nationwide invention contest, the 6-year-old created what she calls the "Crust Buster," a square device that cuts the crust around sandwiches in one fell swoop. "I thought of it when I was eating lunch," said the first grader, who actually built the Crust Buster in February while in kindergarten at St. Catherine of Siena in Horsham. "I really don't like crusts. " Her invention, made with popsicle sticks and the cutting edges taken from aluminum foil and wax paper dispensers, won first prize out of all kindergarten students who entered the Invent America!
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It happened about 8:30 one rainy Cinnaminson morning, an event that may go down in school bus history: Jordan Wompierski and Carly Snyder missed the bus. So Jordan, who hates waiting, and Carly, who loves science, put their heads together. "I wish there was some way we could know when the bus was coming," said Carly, 8. "I hate standing out there when it rains. " "I want to invent a thing that beeps when the bus is near," said Jordan, also 8. The result? J.C.'s Bus-O-Matic, a design for a transmitter-and-receiver device that last week won the second-grade prize in the national "Invent America" contest.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Theaters were dark all over town last night, but the footlights shined brightly in Irvine Auditorium, 34th and Spruce streets, where the sixth annual Barrymore Awards for Excellence in Theatre paid honor to the best of show on the local theater scene. Produced by the Theatre Alliance of Greater Philadelphia, the Barrymores are the region's only professional theater awards program. During the 1999-2000 season, 27 professional theaters participated in the process, putting together 98 productions, 72 of which became Barrymore eligible after their initial nominations.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Teacher Elaine Mendelow never promised Cinnaminson students that the life of an inventor would be an easy one. Just ask Jacqueline Guscott, a kindergarten student at the New Albany School, who fashioned a machine to melt milk cartons for the district's annual mini-invention contest for elementary-school students. "My brother is a pest," Jacqueline told the judges as they looked over her invention, a series of boxes covered with tin foil. "He wanted to take apart my invention.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By Bill Tyson, Special to The Inquirer
An invention to clean dirt off of shoes has won a $1,000 grant for the Upper Darby School District and a savings bond for the student inventor. Jimmy Sylvestri, who was in fifth grade at Highland Park Elementary School when he invented the shoe cleaner last year, took part in a science teaching project coordinated by faculty member Faith Mattison. Sylvestri, now in the sixth grade at Beverly Hills Elementary School, was congratulated by Superintendent Joseph P. Batory at the school board meeting Tuesday night.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawrence G. Caldwell, 78, of Blue Bell, an inventor, teacher and authority on pneumatic technology, died Saturday at Temple University Hospital. He died of liver failure, caused by hepatitis C. Mr. Caldwell's most recent invention, completed and patented in 1995, was a switching device that is bringing major changes to pneumatic conveying systems. Those systems are used to move bulk materials, such as powder detergents, sugar, fertilizer and plastic pellets, from storage to machines for packaging or further processing.
NEWS
September 21, 1986
I would like to share with you a remarkable idea for a timely new invention that could conceivably be in place in time for the next presidential election. It is a toilet that would automatically perform a drug test. Should the results turn out positive, flexible robotic arms would fly out from either side of the commode, trapping the addict until the authorities could arrive. These units could be installed in public restrooms and their use would, of course, be voluntary. Anyone opposing such a measure would run the risk of being labeled "soft on drugs.
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Physicist Gordon Gould completed a 30-year odyssey through the U.S. bureaucracy and legal system yesterday when he was formally presented a patent - and the possibility of a payoff worth millions - for his 1957 invention, the gas discharge laser. Gould, 67, fought the U.S. Patent Office and took his case through four separate federal court actions before he received credit for developing the process that is now most commonly used at cash register checkouts and in laser disc stereo equipment.
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