CollectionsInvention
IN THE NEWS

Invention

NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Carole Lokan-Moore, who's as charming as her opinions about gay people are charmless, proudly shows me around her Edgewater Park bed-and-breakfast. With its tasteful antiques and organic breakfasts, Whitebriar could be in Provincetown. Except that a sign outside this lovely establishment promotes Wednesday as "appreciation day" for Chick-fil-A, the fast-foodery whose president's distaste for gay nuptials has become more famous than his chain's "hand-spun" milkshakes. Lokan-Moore's "one man, one woman" marriage sign, not far from Route 130 on busy Cooper Street, drew the ire of Burlington County resident Joianne Fraschilla, whose electronic exchanges with Lokan-Moore are being passed around the Internet.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
If the takeout beverage industry embraces Drexel University sophomore Patrick Bowlin's half-inch invention, his father, Thomas, stands to be a very happy man. "I was going to buy my dad a Porsche 911 for his 60th birthday," Bowlin said. "I've got two years. " Young Bowlin is off to a promising start - with an idea that started with a sip of hot chocolate in April and now seems to have a strong shot at a patent. "I couldn't find anything . . . so, keep our fingers crossed, hopefully Patrick's got something here," said Joseph E. Maenner, of Maenner & Associates L.L.C.
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The idea came from the news, a simple reminder to change your smoke-detector batteries when moving your clocks ahead or back in the spring and fall. At that moment, Jordan Wompierski, a 10-year-old always on the prowl for a new invention, had a breakthrough: Why not create a clock with a built-in smoke detector? From that idea came the Life-Time, a clock-and-detector-in-one devised by Jordan and his fifth-grade classmate Catherine Horan. The pair took first place at a regional invention competition, called Students Inventions Through Education, held in Pomona on April 28. Next month, their work will be submitted in Invent America, a program run by the U.S. Patent Model Foundation in Alexandria, Va. This is just the latest chapter in Jordan's career as a young inventor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2011
IF NECESSITY is the mother of invention, beer is its wild-eyed uncle. You know, the one who corners you at family reunions with his latest can't-miss scheme, one that will revolutionize society and earn a bazillion bucks if you want to invest a couple thou. No doubt fueled by a sixpack or two, inventors and assorted crackpots fill the archives of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office with off-the-wall ideas to enhance consumption of our favorite beverage. Grand ideas such as: *  Party Goggles , application No. 12/927,974, by Bruce Riggs of Helendale, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010
GIMME FIVE "The Last Song" wasn't a blockbuster, but it was Greg Kinnear's highest-grossing movie in a while. His last five outings: 1. "The Last Song. " (2010) $62 million. 2. "Green Zone. " (2010) $35 million. Plays a Pentagon Special Intelligence officer in Baghdad. 3. "Flash of Genius. " (2008) $4 million. Kinnear takes on Detroit over the invention of intermittent windshield wipers. 4. "Ghost Town. " (2008) $13 million. He's a ghost, meddling in his widow's affairs.
NEWS
November 15, 1992 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Danielle Sano hates bread crusts - so she's doing something about it. As part of a nationwide invention contest, the 6-year-old created what she calls the "Crust Buster," a square device that cuts the crust around sandwiches in one fell swoop. "I thought of it when I was eating lunch," said the first grader, who actually built the Crust Buster in February while in kindergarten at St. Catherine of Siena in Horsham. "I really don't like crusts. " Her invention, made with popsicle sticks and the cutting edges taken from aluminum foil and wax paper dispensers, won first prize out of all kindergarten students who entered the Invent America!
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It happened about 8:30 one rainy Cinnaminson morning, an event that may go down in school bus history: Jordan Wompierski and Carly Snyder missed the bus. So Jordan, who hates waiting, and Carly, who loves science, put their heads together. "I wish there was some way we could know when the bus was coming," said Carly, 8. "I hate standing out there when it rains. " "I want to invent a thing that beeps when the bus is near," said Jordan, also 8. The result? J.C.'s Bus-O-Matic, a design for a transmitter-and-receiver device that last week won the second-grade prize in the national "Invent America" contest.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Theaters were dark all over town last night, but the footlights shined brightly in Irvine Auditorium, 34th and Spruce streets, where the sixth annual Barrymore Awards for Excellence in Theatre paid honor to the best of show on the local theater scene. Produced by the Theatre Alliance of Greater Philadelphia, the Barrymores are the region's only professional theater awards program. During the 1999-2000 season, 27 professional theaters participated in the process, putting together 98 productions, 72 of which became Barrymore eligible after their initial nominations.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Teacher Elaine Mendelow never promised Cinnaminson students that the life of an inventor would be an easy one. Just ask Jacqueline Guscott, a kindergarten student at the New Albany School, who fashioned a machine to melt milk cartons for the district's annual mini-invention contest for elementary-school students. "My brother is a pest," Jacqueline told the judges as they looked over her invention, a series of boxes covered with tin foil. "He wanted to take apart my invention.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By Bill Tyson, Special to The Inquirer
An invention to clean dirt off of shoes has won a $1,000 grant for the Upper Darby School District and a savings bond for the student inventor. Jimmy Sylvestri, who was in fifth grade at Highland Park Elementary School when he invented the shoe cleaner last year, took part in a science teaching project coordinated by faculty member Faith Mattison. Sylvestri, now in the sixth grade at Beverly Hills Elementary School, was congratulated by Superintendent Joseph P. Batory at the school board meeting Tuesday night.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|