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Invention

NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Peter Mucha and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Today's animated Google Doodle -- its ever changing home-page logo -- touts a local milestone: The debut of the drive-in movie theater in Pennsauken 79 years ago today. People paid up to $1 to park their Model A's, Hudsons and Packards to watch "Wives Beware," an English comedy on a huge screen as a loud sound system disturbed the neighbors near Airport Circle, back when it had an airport. Yes, it was a talkie. Not long after drive-ins caught on, clunky wired speakers were provided for each car. The inventor, Richard Hollingshead Jr., may have gotten the idea from his mother, Donna, a large woman who disliked cramped movie theater seats.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Monika Scislowska, Associated Press
BIALKA TATRZANSKA, Poland - Just a few years ago, winter was a dead season for the Kotelnica Mountain, quiet under a quilt of snow. Today, Kotelnica vibrates with activity from ski fans who flock to the new resort, one of Poland's trendiest. The transformation happened in just a decade and reflects the inventiveness and enterprise seen in Poland since a market economy arrived with democracy in 1990. People in this 17th-century village at the foot of the Tatra Mountains in southern Poland were making a modest living on farming and sheep breeding, with additional funds coming from relatives who had gone, in a long-standing tradition, to the United States for work.
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | By Marwan Kreidie
Newt Gingrich raises interesting questions, but he doesn't always have the right answers. Gingrich recently questioned the concept of a Palestinian nation, declaring it "invented. " Is that true? Yes - just as true as it is that all nations are invented or imagined. The concept of nation is relatively new in human history, having grown at least partly out of another kind of innovation: the movable-type printing press, invented by Johannes Gutenberg around 1440. To find buyers for their products, printers and booksellers found that it was good business to use a region's dominant language - say, the English spoken in London or the French spoken in Paris.
NEWS
December 11, 2011 | By Daniel Estrin, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Palestinian officials reacted furiously on Saturday to Newt Gingrich's assertion that they are an "invented people," accusing the Republican presidential candidate of incitement and staging a "cheap stunt" to court the Jewish vote. Gingrich's remarks struck at the heart of Palestinian sensitivities about the righteousness of their struggle for an independent state and put him at odds not only with the international community but with all but an extremist fringe in Israel.
NEWS
December 10, 2011 | By Thomas Beaumont, Associated Press
CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa - Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney dived into his campaign's full-scale critique of rival Newt Gingrich on Friday, standing by top supporters who described the former House speaker as self-serving and mocking some of his ideas about science and technology. In return, top Gingrich backers described Romney's criticism as a sign of panic less than four weeks until the Iowa caucuses begin the 2012 nominating contest. Gingrich has risen to the top of Iowa polls in the last two weeks and is leading in some other states, too. While Gingrich kept to his pledge not to criticize his GOP rivals, he reignited criticism for being a loose cannon by referring to the Palestinians as being an "invented" people.
NEWS
November 27, 2011
By Kirsten Kaschock Coffee House Press. 286 pp. $16. Reviewed by Alison Barker By the end of Kirsten Kaschock's debut novel Sleight , questions abound. How does she do that - create a novel like a set of Russian nesting dolls, each whimsical creation housing a new wonder? And, can someone please do the performance art she invents - called "sleight" - in the real world? Most important: Why can't more novels use fairy tale to ask big questions? In Sleight we encounter part-living, part-inanimate objects called Needs and Souls; artists who apprentice as "hands" in secluded farmhouses; a girl's imaginary friend who is her late grandfather (as a young child)
BUSINESS
October 16, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
At age 41, Aaron Krause, a husband and father of 6-year-old twins, most certainly is old enough to speak for himself. Yet, it was his father who best explained why his son - frequent wearer of orange sneakers in honor of his beloved Philadelphia Flyers - has 10 patents and three more pending. "He's very clever and creative," Robert Krause, a retired cardiologist from Wynnewood, said of the middle of three children born to him and wife, Marilyn, a retired pediatrician. That's the child who, at 13, rewired telephone lines to get phone service in his bedroom when his parents wouldn't buy it for him. The child who, while still in high school, transformed the family garage into an auto-detailing shop.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARTFORD, Conn. - Lee Davenport, a physicist who developed a radar device that helped U.S. and Allied troops win key battles in World War II, has died. He was 95. He died Friday of cancer in Greenwich, his daughter, Carol Davenport, said yesterday. Davenport was among hundreds of scientists who worked at the secret Massachusetts Institute of Technology Radiation Laboratory, even before America joined the war in 1941, to develop radar systems that would give the U.S. military an edge.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ela I first interviewed Jason Cichonski when he was 24, and brilliantly helming the kitchen at Lacroix. Three years later, he's on the brink of opening his own restaurant, with dishes as inventive as those from his Lacroix days. Smoked french fries with honey malt? Green curry marinated olives? Brioche gnocchi with smoked caviar? Yes, please. His vision for the Queen Village space has exposed brick and raw concrete, warmed up with grainy wood tones. At the full bar, there's a focus on wines by the glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2011
IF NECESSITY is the mother of invention, beer is its wild-eyed uncle. You know, the one who corners you at family reunions with his latest can't-miss scheme, one that will revolutionize society and earn a bazillion bucks if you want to invest a couple thou. No doubt fueled by a sixpack or two, inventors and assorted crackpots fill the archives of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office with off-the-wall ideas to enhance consumption of our favorite beverage. Grand ideas such as: *  Party Goggles , application No. 12/927,974, by Bruce Riggs of Helendale, Calif.
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