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BUSINESS
April 18, 2011
Bob Hoeveler is 80 and has bum knees. In other words, the grandfather of five has excuse enough to quit mowing his lawn. Not that that's happening. "No man that has a tractor will ever give it up," Hoeveler declared during an interview last week, his John Deere LX280 parked nearby. That tractor is not only why he still mows his acre in East Bradford, Chester County, but also why he's still working. Hoeveler has just launched a small business from his basement, peddling a product he invented that he hopes will be considered a must-have by other riding-mower devotees: A stick-on container called the Tractor Holster.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011
IN THE ENTIRE history of mankind, there has been only one invention that fundamentally improved life for the beer drinker: the twist-off bottle cap. OK, two, if you count flushable toilets. And now there are three, thanks to the Bottoms Up Draft Beer Dispenser. It does exactly what it says: It fills beer cups through the bottom of the cup. A beer vendor simply places a plastic cup on the dispenser, and - without pulling a tap handle or even pressing a button - it fills up in seconds, with a perfect collar of foam on the top. It's not just some technological gimmick.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010
GIMME FIVE "The Last Song" wasn't a blockbuster, but it was Greg Kinnear's highest-grossing movie in a while. His last five outings: 1. "The Last Song. " (2010) $62 million. 2. "Green Zone. " (2010) $35 million. Plays a Pentagon Special Intelligence officer in Baghdad. 3. "Flash of Genius. " (2008) $4 million. Kinnear takes on Detroit over the invention of intermittent windshield wipers. 4. "Ghost Town. " (2008) $13 million. He's a ghost, meddling in his widow's affairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2010
Inventors interested in speaking with TeleBrands can e-mail InventorsDay@TeleBrands.com with a description of their inventions. If TeleBrands is interested, it will contact the inventor.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010
DEAR ABBY: I am a 27-year-old woman who lives alone in a house I own. Sometimes strangers come to the house for various reasons - plumbers, electricians, etc. One question I am frequently asked is, "Do you live alone?" I just don't know how to answer that question without feeling like someone might take advantage of me. Can you help me and other single women by providing an appropriate response? - Cautious Bachelorette, Huntsville, Ala. DEAR BACHELORETTE : Gladly. Your gut instincts are on target.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2010 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arika Okrent was studying languages at the University of Chicago. The languages people use and how they work. The rules, the changes, the charts. She was in the library, poking around. "And then," says Okrent, relaxing in her Germantown home recently, "I drifted down to the shelves with all the books on invented languages. It was a sad little collection. I felt sorry for it. " But something called to her. Tales of made-up languages and their makers. Esperanto, the most widely spoken of all; Volap√ľk, once the most popular; Klingon, the bark of space invaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Since 2000, DJ and promoter David Pianka has hosted Making Time, a groovy series of party jams at various Philly venues, gay and straight. Pianka has always hosted the cr?me of electro-dance newbies on the verge of breaking big. Calling them "fellow intergalactic cosmic adventures," he's featured everyone from the Strokes in 2001 to Girls, Major Lazer, and Dum Dum Girls in 2010, plus many winning acts in between. While Pianka prepares himself for a 10th-anniversary season (already started on Wednesday)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Sleepy-eyed Philly, its weekend belly growling after a night on the town, used to know exactly where to answer the call for brunch - the neon-lit beacons of diner goodness like the Melrose, Mayfair, and Country Club. With that diner culture sliding into an alarmingly steep decline over the last decade, however, an entirely new genre has stepped into the a.m. hunger void. The funky bruncherie - part hipster cafe, part laboratory to explore the creative limits of stuffed French toast - has become to the old-school diner what gastropubs have been to aging corner taverns.
LIVING
November 13, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
City auctions this weekend and next will reflect two aspects of American history: the inventive glories of 18th-, 19th- and 20th-century arts and crafts and the excesses of the opening years of the 21st century, as symbolized by exclusive Yellowstone Club in Montana. The sale celebrating the inventiveness of the last three centuries will take place at Freeman's tomorrow when it will offer American furniture and decorative arts, and on Sunday, when it will conduct its annual Pennsylvania sale.
NEWS
October 29, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fred E. Shashoua, 78, of Cherry Hill, an inventor and retired aerospace engineer, died of complications from non-Hodgkins lymphoma Oct. 19 at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. In 1962, while an engineer at RCA in Camden, Mr. Shashoua developed an electronic machine for setting Chinese type. The device was a "revolutionary change" from setting Chinese type by hand from more than 5,000 characters, according to a New York Times account at the time. Mr. Shashoua's patented invention used fiber optics and television techniques to reproduce the characters rapidly on film, then transfer them to lithograph plates for offset printing.
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