CollectionsInvestigation
IN THE NEWS

Investigation

NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA ISLE CITY, N.J. Authorities continued their investigation Saturday into a Friday-afternoon fire that destroyed five vacation houses along the 7800 block of Pleasure Avenue in this Shore resort. Police said investigators would return to the scene Monday. No one was injured in the fire, which broke out shortly before 4:30 p.m. Friday. At its height, the seven-alarm fire brought out 14 local departments and three emergency medical service squads, said Lt. Thomas McQuillen of the Sea Isle City Police Department.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis Craig R. McCoy and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - On Monday, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane said there were "inexplicable delays" in the Jerry Sandusky investigation and suggested that may have set the stage for two more young men to be victimized. She said the two told prosecutors they had been abused while the state was undertaking its 33-month investigation. Kane said she could not give details except to say the two were not among the 10 victims Sandusky was later charged with sexually assaulting. Late Tuesday, Kane's office acknowledged that she misspoke - that Sandusky had indeed been charged with abusing one of the young men. In fact, prosecutors had called him to the stand during the 2012 trial and a jury convicted Sandusky of abusing him. On Tuesday, one day after Kane released a report that failed to affirm many of her complaints about the Sandusky investigation, the focus turned to Kane herself and her new charge that a bogged-down investigation may have enabled Sandusky to strike again.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Authorities are investigating why a New Jersey state trooper who struck another vehicle on I-295 with an unmarked police car was permitted to use a false name on accident reports. Undercover Detective Sgt. William Billingham has since been suspended without pay and charged. However, many questions remain unanswered about the accident on March 22, 2009, that sent the trooper and Philadelphia resident Clayton Tanksley, 46, to area hospitals. Sources said Billingham was part of a clandestine state investigation when authorities accepted the undercover identification, and he was taken to Cooper University Hospital in Camden with six broken ribs.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
State Attorney General Kathleen Kane has hired one of the most feared litigators in the region, Richard A. Sprague, to represent her in possible defamation suits arising from accounts of her decision to end an undercover investigation that taped at least five Philadelphia Democrats accepting cash or gifts. Sprague said he would launch an investigation into the conduct of the prosecutors who ran that sting operation, which began in 2010 before Kane took office. She has said the case was mismanaged, possibly tainted by racial profiling, and far too weak for any prosecutions.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Barbara Laker & David Gambacorta, Daily News Staff Writers
IT STARTED with flattery. Staff Inspector Jerrold Bates summoned aide Keisha Johnson into his office in the Philadelphia Police Internal Affairs Bureau. He asked her to take a seat. She was smart, professional, he said. She put people at ease and made him look good. He walked toward Johnson and stood behind her chair. "You're pretty much a reflection of me," Bates said that day in early 2008, according to Johnson. He placed his hands on the shoulders of her petite 5-foot-5 frame.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - On Monday, Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said she would "love to sit all day" and answer questions about her office's review of why her predecessors took so long to bring charges against serial child-abuser Jerry Sandusky. That was before her office acknowledged that she erred on a key and emotionally charged question: whether any children had been abused by Sandusky while the 33-month-long state investigation was ongoing. On Friday, Kane refused to answer questions about the issue or clarify her comments.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane said Monday that she believed leading Philadelphia Democrats ensnared in an undercover sting operation committed crimes, but that the case against them was so badly mishandled by her predecessors that it could not be prosecuted. Responding to a report in Sunday's Inquirer that five public officials, including four state legislators from Philadelphia, were captured on tape accepting cash, gifts, or money orders, Kane said she had no choice but to shut down the investigation.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - A review has found no evidence that then-Attorney General Tom Corbett delayed the investigation into serial sex abuser Jerry Sandusky for political gain, but it raises questions about the pace of the case, according to three people who have read the report. The report also does not fault prosecutors for taking the case to a grand jury, a step that lengthened the investigation and that critics contended kept Sandusky on the streets, the sources said. But the review does flag the timing of certain decisions prosecutors made, such as searching Sandusky's house two years after the investigation began.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Federal prosecutors in Philadelphia never deemed a sting operation that targeted public corruption as too weak to prosecute, according to District Attorney Seth Williams and law enforcement sources familiar with the brief federal review of the investigation. The sources and Williams say the prosecutors never came to a judgment about the investigation one way or another before the state attorney general asked them to halt their review. Their statements echo a declaration by the Philadelphia office of the FBI, which said it made no judgment about whether the case was suitable for prosecution.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah, Jonathan Tamari, and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, who has been contending with a long-running federal investigation, told Congress this week that federal prosecutors in Philadelphia had subpoenaed "certain documents" from his congressional offices. Following House rules that require such disclosure, the Philadelphia Democrat notified Speaker John A. Boehner of the subpoena in a letter dated Monday, saying that he believed some of the information prosecutors demanded was protected by congressional privilege and that he would fight to stop its release.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|