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NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
State Attorney General Kathleen Kane has hired one of the most feared litigators in the region, Richard A. Sprague, to represent her in possible defamation suits arising from accounts of her decision to end an undercover investigation that taped at least five Philadelphia Democrats accepting cash or gifts. Sprague said he would launch an investigation into the conduct of the prosecutors who ran that sting operation, which began in 2010 before Kane took office. She has said the case was mismanaged, possibly tainted by racial profiling, and far too weak for any prosecutions.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By Allison Steele and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For months last winter, rumors swirled in the offices of the Philadelphia Police Department about veteran homicide Detective Kenneth Rossiter, supposedly under investigation for collecting overtime pay for hours he had not worked. Last week, Rossiter, 51, learned that Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey was firing him for an alleged pattern of overtime fraud. Police would not comment on the specifics of the Internal Affairs investigation, but several sources familiar with the case said Rossiter was accused of multiple instances of clocking into court for work, going home for several hours, then returning to clock out of court to indicate he was there all day. He will be formally dismissed after a 30-day suspension.
NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Atlantic City and one of its police officers must pay $250,000 each in compensatory damages after a jury found the officer used excessive force against a man and the department failed to provide proper training to its officers. Michael Troso, 39, a former New Jersey deputy attorney general, sued the city and five of its officers after an incident at the Trump Marina on the night of his bachelor party Aug. 9, 2008. The Wednesday evening verdict came as Atlantic City and the lone officer found at fault, Sterling Wheaten, a K-9 handler, are being sued in at least five separate federal lawsuits.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA ISLE CITY, N.J. Authorities continued their investigation Saturday into a Friday-afternoon fire that destroyed five vacation houses along the 7800 block of Pleasure Avenue in this Shore resort. Police said investigators would return to the scene Monday. No one was injured in the fire, which broke out shortly before 4:30 p.m. Friday. At its height, the seven-alarm fire brought out 14 local departments and three emergency medical service squads, said Lt. Thomas McQuillen of the Sea Isle City Police Department.
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | By Tricia Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sen. Pat Toomey visited a Montgomery County VFW on Tuesday to rail against leadership lapses that led to the growing Veterans Affairs scandal and to propose his own legislation for rectifying the wrong with service members. Toomey, citing what his spokeswoman said were media reports, said "at least one" Pennsylvania-based VA was among the 26 being investigated by the federal government for delayed appointments. But neither he nor his staff was able to say which VA had been implicated or to detail the claims against it. "I'm not certain which one it is," the Republican senator said at the Willow Grove VFW post, speaking to a room of mostly media and a few veterans.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
From the outside it looks like a slam-dunk case: four Democratic state lawmakers from Philadelphia and a city judge captured on tape as they accept money or gifts from an undercover informant. Attorney General Kathleen Kane's decision to drop the investigation deeply troubled some former prosecutors, who want to know more about how that determination was reached. But it does not surprise defense lawyers, who say even an expertly run sting can be difficult to prove. "This could be a perfectly prosecutable case - or this could be a case that should not be brought," said veteran Philadelphia defense lawyer Robert E. Welsh, who worked six years as a federal prosecutor.
NEWS
September 29, 2011 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
ANTHONY MAGSAM had a decision to make. He opened his front door early yesterday in Northeast Philly and found a group of SWAT cops standing there, search warrant in hand. He decided to cooperate. Magsam, a veteran police officer who's at the center of an ongoing investigation into the Police Department's Firearms Identification Unit, or FIU, let the cops inside and went quietly to Internal Affairs for questioning, said Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey. The SWAT officers removed 51 firearms from Magsam's house, on Tyson Avenue near Loretto Avenue.
NEWS
July 7, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput has removed two more priests accused of misconduct with minors and restored four to ministry. The six are among the 26 Catholic priests whom the archdiocese placed on administrative leave last year following a Philadelphia grand jury investigation into clergy sex abuse and misconduct involving children. In an announcement Friday, the archdiocese disclosed that a 16-month investigation by a team it had created found that the Rev. John Bowe, 64, and the Rev. David Givey, 68, had violated "standards of ministerial behavior and boundaries.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A longtime good-government activist filed ethics complaints Tuesday against leading Philadelphia Democrats ensnared in an undercover sting investigation by the state Attorney General's Office. The complaints by Gene Stilp, a former Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor and Congress, came in response to a report in Sunday's Inquirer that at least five public officials, including four state representatives, had been captured on tape accepting money or gifts. Stilp filed two complaints, one with the Pennsylvania State Ethics Commission, another with the House of Representatives' Ethics Committee.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis Craig R. McCoy and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - On Monday, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane said there were "inexplicable delays" in the Jerry Sandusky investigation and suggested that may have set the stage for two more young men to be victimized. She said the two told prosecutors they had been abused while the state was undertaking its 33-month investigation. Kane said she could not give details except to say the two were not among the 10 victims Sandusky was later charged with sexually assaulting. Late Tuesday, Kane's office acknowledged that she misspoke - that Sandusky had indeed been charged with abusing one of the young men. In fact, prosecutors had called him to the stand during the 2012 trial and a jury convicted Sandusky of abusing him. On Tuesday, one day after Kane released a report that failed to affirm many of her complaints about the Sandusky investigation, the focus turned to Kane herself and her new charge that a bogged-down investigation may have enabled Sandusky to strike again.
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