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NEWS
March 28, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
A monument to government secrecy will reach another milestone Saturday, when the investigation of the violent deaths of New Jersey political insider John Sheridan and his wife, Joyce, will have lasted six months. And despite occasional interruptions, the official silence about the crime continues. Why? Let's consider the authorities' own explanations - if only to more fully appreciate their indefensibility. In the rare instances in which officials have attempted to justify their stonewalling, they have dwelled on the complexity and difficulty of the investigation.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Jonathan Tamari, Angelo Fichera, and Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writers
Six Months Of Stonewalling The Inquirer and others have asked only for basic information in the investigation into the deaths of John P. Sheridan Jr. and his wife, Joyce. Six months later, excessive secrecy has compounded a family's loss with a disservice to the public. A18 Behind the scenes of the six-month investigation into the deaths of Cooper University Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr. and his wife, Joyce, a bitter disagreement has unfolded between the couple's family and investigators handling the case, sources say. Several sources close to the investigation said the Sheridans' four sons, aided by nationally renowned forensic pathologist Michael Baden and lawyers, have disputed findings by the Somerset County Prosecutor's Office, as well as how some aspects of the case have been handled.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia Veterans Affairs office should implement widespread policy changes, arrange new training, and hold managers and staffers accountable for altering records and mishandling claims, government investigators say. After a nine-month probe, the VA's Office of Inspector General made 35 recommendations to address shoddy record-keeping, bungled claims, inadequate security, and poor working conditions at the Philadelphia office. The Inquirer obtained a draft of its recommendations Tuesday.
NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams gave the following summary Thursday of the investigation into the shooting of Brandon Tate-Brown following a traffic stop at 2:45 a.m. Dec. 15 in Mayfair: Two officers had pulled over Tate-Brown's Dodge Charger because its running lights - dimmer than headlights - were on, while the actual headlights were off. "I figured he just came out of a store or something and we [were] just going to check to see if [he] was OK to drive and tell him to turn his lights on," the shooting officer's partner told investigators.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams is expected to announce three more arrests Tuesday in the corruption case Pennsylvania's attorney general said was "not prosecutable. " A grand jury has recommended charges against State Reps. Louise Williams Bishop and Michelle Brownlee and a former state representative, Harold James, all Philadelphia Democrats, according to people familiar with the grand jury's actions. Bishop and Brownlee have long been identified as targets of Williams' investigators, ever since he accepted a dare from Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane and reopened a "sting" probe that Kane said was "half-assed" and declined to pursue.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia police officers involved in the December shooting death of 26-year-old Brandon Tate-Brown returned to street duty several weeks ago after being cleared by the department, Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey said Wednesday. The Internal Affairs investigation has been turned over to the District Attorney's Office for review, Ramsey said. Citing that pending review, a spokesman for District Attorney Seth Williams declined to comment Wednesday. Tate-Brown's death has been a local rallying point for people participating in the nationwide protest marches and "die-ins" that followed the grand-jury decisions last year not to indict police officers involved in the deaths of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and Eric Garner in Staten Island, N.Y. Tate-Brown's family has maintained that the shooting was not justified and has pleaded with the Police Department to release surveillance video footage of the incident.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Nutter administration reassigned the second-in-command at the Department of Licenses & Inspections Friday, while the city investigates his oversight of tough new demolition regulations imposed after the Center City building collapse that killed six people in 2013. Scott Mulderig, the department's director of Emergency Services - a unit that deals with demolitions, building collapses, fires, and other matters - has been reassigned pending the outcome of an investigation, city officials said Friday.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating why the nose-gear wheels on a US Airways flight from Philadelphia to Houston failed to deploy as the crew prepared to land Monday night. The reason appears to be mechanical failure. The Embraer 190 aircraft, with 52 passengers and four crew members on board, circled the traffic-control tower at George Bush Intercontinental Airport several times to let controllers take a look. The pilots then decided to make an emergency landing.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying they had been "swatted," police are investigating two false reports of shootings in Bala Cynwyd in Lower Merion Township Saturday. "Nobody was shot in our township," a Lower Merion Township police dispatcher said Saturday. When "swatting," callers play a dangerous trick on law enforcement by contacting police to report crimes that never occurred, prompting officers to rush to the scene for no reason. Besides wasting resources, it creates unecessary danger as officers drive quickly to the scene.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - A watchdog group led by a Democratic operative on Thursday asked the New Jersey State Ethics Commission to investigate whether Gov. Christie broke the law by allegedly accepting "gifts of foreign travel and lavish lodgings and entertainment" on his 2012 trip to Israel. The complaint comes after the New York Times reported Monday that Christie and his family flew to Israel on a private jet provided by the billionaire Sheldon Adelson while the Las Vegas casino magnate was lobbying against legislation that would ultimately legalize online gambling in New Jersey.
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