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Investigation

ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Government Accountability Office has agreed to investigate why an electric device used in gynecological surgery was marketed for two decades before safety warnings were issued by the Food and Drug Administration. The GAO, which investigates how the government spends tax dollars, sent a confirmatory letter to U.S. Rep Mike Fitzpatrick (R, Pa). He and 11 other members of Congress requested the probe last month. "GAO accepts your request as work that is within the scope of its authority," said the Sept.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah can't keep federal investigators out of his Gmail inbox by claiming a congressional privilege typically used to protect lawmakers from interference by the executive branch, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. The decision - by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit - clears the way for prosecutors to sift through seven years of the Philadelphia Democrat's private email as they prepare for his trial on racketeering conspiracy charges next year.
NEWS
September 2, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
DEAD BODIES in funeral homes? Sure. Decomposing bodies lying around in body bags, with no decent end in sight? That's not OK, and that's why Philadelphia police, acting on a tip, were all over a West Philly funeral home yesterday afternoon. The Pennsylvania Department of State was tipped off around 2:35 p.m., and when police arrived at Hawkins Funeral Services at 53rd and Vine streets they found three bodies, Lt. John Walker said. One body was in a casket, embalmed, awaiting cremation.
NEWS
August 30, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Relatives of the dead are reeling at the discovery of three bodies in a Strawberry Mansion garage, as an investigation continues into the funeral home that stored the corpses there. Reginald Andrews, who attended his uncle Albert Andrews' funeral July 30, said he was shocked to learn that his relative's body had languished in a garage on the 2600 block of Hagert Street. On Tuesday, neighbors investigating a foul odor discovered the bodies, all badly decomposed. Police quickly traced them to the funeral home around the corner, Powell Mortuary Services, operated by Janet Powell Dailey.
NEWS
August 28, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
As Attorney General Kathleen Kane plotted to leak secret grand jury information and instructed aides to spy on her employees' emails, prosecutors said, she used personal email accounts to conduct business. Revelations about Kane's use of personal emails led Montgomery County prosecutors to serve search warrants for her Yahoo and AOL email accounts as they built a criminal case against her. On Monday, Kane was held for trial on charges of leaking confidential information to embarrass a critic and then lying about it under oath.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Kathleen Kane sowed the seeds of her undoing during her seemingly flawless first year in office. That was the year the Democratic attorney general, newly elected in a landslide, won national attention for stands in favor of gun control and marriage equality. MSNBC host Chris Matthews even suggested she was presidential material. But it was also the year she secretly shut down an undercover sting operation she inherited from her Republican predecessors. Though the investigation had caught Democratic elected officials in Philadelphia pocketing cash and jewelry, Kane, in 2013, declined to press charges, saying the case was badly flawed and possibly tainted by racial targeting.
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twelve members of Congress have asked the U.S. Government Accountability Office to investigate why an electric device used in gynecologic surgery was marketed for two decades before safety warnings were issued by the Food and Drug Administration. The tissue-dissecting device, called a power morcellator, enables hysterectomies to be done through small rather than large abdominal incisions, but it can also spread and worsen an undetected uterine cancer. After that horrible scenario befell anesthesiologist Amy Reed at a Boston hospital in late 2013, she and her husband, heart surgeon Hooman Noorchashm, launched a campaign to ban electric morcellators.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE ACTIVISTS demanding a new investigation into the controversial police shooting death of Brandon Tate-Brown got a surprising ally yesterday: a police-advocacy group. The Guardian Civic League, which advocates for black officers, joined several other groups - including Philly's NAACP chapter, the Philadelphia Black Clergy, Philadelphians Organized to Witness, Empower & Rebuild and the National Action Network - on the Mayfair street where Tate-Brown, 26, died Dec. 15. The community leaders called on District Attorney Seth Williams to reopen his probe and on Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey to fire and arrest officer Nicholas Carrelli, who shot Tate-Brown during a routine car stop, and Heng Dang, Carrelli's partner.
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frederick L. Cusick, 65, of Lancaster, a longtime reporter and writer for The Inquirer, died Saturday of complications from colon cancer at the Bob Fryer and Family Inpatient Center in Mount Joy, Pa. He had been battling the illness for a year. Mr. Cusick's distinguished Inquirer career began in 1979 and stretched until 2005, when he and 70 other veterans took a buyout and left the newsroom as part of an austerity move. During those 26 years, Mr. Cusick, a skilled reporter and facile writer, covered all kinds of stories - crime, city and suburban news, and government developments from Harrisburg.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Department of Transportation is investigating possible price gouging by five airlines in the days immediately after the May 12 Amtrak derailment in Philadelphia that left thousands of regional commuters scrambling for travel alternatives. The department sent letters Friday to Delta, American, United, Southwest, and JetBlue, asking for price information for destinations between Washington and Boston during the time Amtrak service was suspended. Eight people died and more than 200 were injured when Train 188 derailed.
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