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BUSINESS
October 27, 2012 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration is expected to announce Friday two initiatives, including a seed-capital fund aimed at supporting the city's growing entrepreneurial community. Through the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp., the city intends to invest up to $3 million in a new "Startup PHL Seed Fund," which would be managed by an outside professional investment firm. That money would need to be matched by private investors at least dollar for dollar, according to a request for proposals that the city intends to issue.
NEWS
December 19, 1992
To paraphrase Groucho, "Say the secret word and win . . . millions and millions of dollars. Double, triple, quadruple your money - even more. That not-so-secret word, in the transition to Clintonomics, is investment. Which is a sanitized way for Democrats to talk about (shhh!) spending, often by government or by private concerns with incentives from government. Put out some money now, reap big dividends later. At the two-day economic conference this week, various special pleaders told the president-elect what they believe the country should spend - ahem, invest in. Infrastructure, job creation, education, training, high-speed rail.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
The average new-car buyer spends $15,395 on his or her purchase. That's a real investment. Most people only make one bigger one: when they buy a home. Obviously, most people will want that new-car investment to retain as much value as possible. They will want it to be as long-lived, trouble-free and pleasurable as possible. As economically as possible. Here are some recommmendations on how to protect that costly investment - and how not to waste your money in the process. CHECK RE-SALE VALUE.
NEWS
June 21, 1995 | By Connie Langland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ins and outs of money management preoccupied the Chester County Commissioners at their meeting yesterday. Commissioners Joseph Kenna and Andrew Dinniman agreed the county should act quickly next week to invest the proceeds of a $22.5 million loan from the Delaware Valley Regional Finance Authority. Over time, the funds will be used to finance several major projects in the county, including open-space programs, a public-safety communications system and property reassessment, according to Mark Rupsis, director of administrative services.
NEWS
September 27, 2010
TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals, a privately held Malvern company that develops small-molecule drugs to treat cancer, announced today that it has received an investment of $5 million from Pfizer Ventures. The money brings to $37 million that investors have raised to finance the company since August. The fund will be used for the clinical development a drug that mimics naturally occurring proteins that help promote cell death.    - Christopher K. Hepp
NEWS
October 13, 2010
Discovery Laboratories Inc., Warrington, said today that it will get a $500,000 investment from PharmaBio Development Inc. as Discovery continues development of treatments for respiratory diseases. PharmaBio already owned 5.6 million Discovery shares. It agreed to purchase about 2.4 million additional shares of common stock and warrants for about 1.2 million shares, Discovery said. If it exercises the warrants, PharmaBio would own about 4 percent of outstanding shares. PharmaBio is the former strategic investing subsidiary of clinical research organization Quintiles Transnational Corp.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Radnor Township commissioners have asked for more information on a state-backed investment trust before investing township funds. The commissioners Monday night tabled a resolution that would have authorized the finance director to invest in the Pennsylvania Local Government Investment Trust (PLGIT), whose rates are sometimes higher than those of a commercial bank. Despite assurances from Commissioner George M. Aman 3d that the trust "is safer than banks," Commissioner Clinton A. Stuntebeck moved that the resolution be tabled for further discussion.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ralph Allen Sturdivant Sr., 47, of Cedarbrook, , founder and co-owner of a prominent North Philadelphia investment firm, died Friday while scuba diving on vacation with his wife in the Grand Cayman Islands. Mr. Sturdivant was born in Pilesgrove, N.J., and educated in Baltimore public schools. He received a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Morgan State University. He also studied at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. After two years in the Army, where he attained the rank of first lieutenant, Mr. Sturdivant worked for U.S. Steel and then for Merrill Lynch, where he was an account executive.
NEWS
November 11, 2002
Westward ho! That could be the latest rallying cry for housing in Philadelphia thanks to Citizens Bank's new program in and around University City. The news couldn't be more welcome. Not only will the effort build upon the University of Pennsylvania's success in redeveloping that area, it could encourage other lenders to invest in neighborhoods with the potential to go from high-risk to highly desirable. Citizens will make available $28.5 million in grants and low-interest loans for small businesses, and for residents and community groups to buy properties and do renovations.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Superior Group Inc., of West Conshohocken, sold two companies, Superior Tube Co. Inc. in Collegeville and Fine Tubes Ltd. in England, to the Watermill Group, a private investment company in Lexington, Mass., the buyer said. The price was not disclosed. The manufacturers' products are used in the energy, aerospace, and medical device industries. Fine Tubes employs around 380 people, according to its website. Watermill did not immediately respond to a request for more details on the Collegeville operation.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 7, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Robo-advisers. They're coming from the future, for your assets. Actually, the term is just slang for low-cost, Internet-only money managers. Start-ups such as WiseBanyan.com and Betterment.com automate investing with few or no humans involved and offer extras such as tax-loss harvesting. Betterment's pitch: Investors pay a fraction of what it would cost at a traditional broker or money manager. Some, like WiseBanyan, offer money management for free. But how? These young robo-advisers generally invest using ETFs, or exchange traded funds, rather than mutual funds.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The most important financial event in your life can be landing a job. And when readers write in saying, "Thanks, but how about helping me find work?" how can I refuse? First place to start the hunt is a supportive environment. That would be the Free Library of Philadelphia, both the central library at 1901 Vine St., just off the Parkway - where a job fair is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 21 on the first floor - and the regional libraries, such as the Paschalville branch, at 6942 Woodland Ave. Then there's the Free Library's year-round career center.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Angelakis, 50, the Comcast Corp. executive who headed the negotiations for NBCUniversal and Time Warner Cable Inc., will resign his posts as chief financial officer and vice chairman to lead a new Comcast-controlled $4.1 billion investment arm. The new venture, which Comcast calls a "strategic company," would be one of the biggest funds of its kind in Pennsylvania and will be looking for high-return investments like one Comcast made into...
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
What can you expect, when your surrogate is expecting? Prospective parents may be willing to pay any price. But first, examine the sensitive financial questions behind hiring a legal, legitimate surrogate (by legal, we mean not a woman you found online). What does the process cost? Who gets paid? Can you take out a home equity loan or charge credit cards? (Yes to both). The costs of surrogacy are usually about $120,000, experts advise. But like any lifetime investment, such as college or retirement, you can pay in stages.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The new chairman of the board that oversees New Jersey's $77 billion pension fund for public employees warned Wednesday against a bill passed by the Legislature that would expand pay-to-play restrictions on the state's investments, saying it would force New Jersey to sell top-performing assets at "disadvantageous prices. " Those remarks came as the state moved ahead with a $100 million investment in a fund controlled by a private-equity firm whose cofounder donated $2.5 million in the last two years to a Republican committee with close ties to Gov. Christie.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The New Jersey board that oversees the management of the state's $80 billion public employee pension system is considering investing $100 million with a firm whose chairman has donated $2.5 million to the Republican Governors Association since 2013. Gov. Christie chaired the association last year and helped raise record sums for GOP gubernatorial candidates across the country. In 2013, the RGA contributed to Christie's own reelection in New Jersey. The council is scheduled to vote Wednesday on a proposal to invest $100 million in pension funds with a fund managed by the private-equity firm KSL Capital Partners.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Let's say I'm asking for a raise, pay that reflects the work I do and the value I contribute to my company. The question is . . . how? I sought out Mika Brzezinski, co-host of MSNBC's Morning Joe and the best-selling book Knowing Your Value . She'll be coming to Loews Hotel in Center City on April 10 for the first stop on her "Grow Your Value" tour, a live workshop event with an interactive contest that asks women to enter one-minute videos...
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
My farm-to-table fantasy? I harvest eggs, milk and honey with my own hands and eat the fruits of my labor, aglow in the setting sun. Yet I'm a city slicker with a short attention span. So where's the happy medium for a potential urban farmer like me? Renting. Yes, just in time for spring, you can rent chickens for eggs (with an option to adopt if you come to love them) or goats for grazing your lawn (they don't bite). You can even rent your own honeybee colony to buzz about on your rooftop or in your backyard.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Becoming widowed: It could bring some of the most important financial changes in our lives. How do we prepare for - or pick up the pieces after - losing a spouse? First off, consider a "family playbook" with names of important contacts, account and policy numbers, locations of the wills, and other key documents. (Details in a moment.) Then decide who's on your team. A white paper, "Women in Transition," by strategic consulting firm Spectrem Group found that, in wealth management, widows are most likely to be entirely adviser-dependent - relying on an investment professional or adviser to make most or all investment decisions.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
If you are free March 14, learn the basics of how to invest - without a broker or product-pusher telling you what to buy and sell. Philly's local chapter of BetterInvesting.org, a nonprofit investment club, meets at the Montgomery County-Norristown Public Library at 1001 Powell St. in Norristown, from 9:30 a.m. to noon. The chapter meets the second Saturday of every month. It's free. This is a great way to learn about stocks and mutual funds without any conflicts of interest from big banks or fund companies.
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