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Investment

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BUSINESS
October 27, 2012 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration is expected to announce Friday two initiatives, including a seed-capital fund aimed at supporting the city's growing entrepreneurial community. Through the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp., the city intends to invest up to $3 million in a new "Startup PHL Seed Fund," which would be managed by an outside professional investment firm. That money would need to be matched by private investors at least dollar for dollar, according to a request for proposals that the city intends to issue.
NEWS
December 19, 1992
To paraphrase Groucho, "Say the secret word and win . . . millions and millions of dollars. Double, triple, quadruple your money - even more. That not-so-secret word, in the transition to Clintonomics, is investment. Which is a sanitized way for Democrats to talk about (shhh!) spending, often by government or by private concerns with incentives from government. Put out some money now, reap big dividends later. At the two-day economic conference this week, various special pleaders told the president-elect what they believe the country should spend - ahem, invest in. Infrastructure, job creation, education, training, high-speed rail.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
The average new-car buyer spends $15,395 on his or her purchase. That's a real investment. Most people only make one bigger one: when they buy a home. Obviously, most people will want that new-car investment to retain as much value as possible. They will want it to be as long-lived, trouble-free and pleasurable as possible. As economically as possible. Here are some recommmendations on how to protect that costly investment - and how not to waste your money in the process. CHECK RE-SALE VALUE.
NEWS
June 21, 1995 | By Connie Langland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ins and outs of money management preoccupied the Chester County Commissioners at their meeting yesterday. Commissioners Joseph Kenna and Andrew Dinniman agreed the county should act quickly next week to invest the proceeds of a $22.5 million loan from the Delaware Valley Regional Finance Authority. Over time, the funds will be used to finance several major projects in the county, including open-space programs, a public-safety communications system and property reassessment, according to Mark Rupsis, director of administrative services.
NEWS
September 27, 2010
TetraLogic Pharmaceuticals, a privately held Malvern company that develops small-molecule drugs to treat cancer, announced today that it has received an investment of $5 million from Pfizer Ventures. The money brings to $37 million that investors have raised to finance the company since August. The fund will be used for the clinical development a drug that mimics naturally occurring proteins that help promote cell death.    - Christopher K. Hepp
NEWS
October 13, 2010
Discovery Laboratories Inc., Warrington, said today that it will get a $500,000 investment from PharmaBio Development Inc. as Discovery continues development of treatments for respiratory diseases. PharmaBio already owned 5.6 million Discovery shares. It agreed to purchase about 2.4 million additional shares of common stock and warrants for about 1.2 million shares, Discovery said. If it exercises the warrants, PharmaBio would own about 4 percent of outstanding shares. PharmaBio is the former strategic investing subsidiary of clinical research organization Quintiles Transnational Corp.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Radnor Township commissioners have asked for more information on a state-backed investment trust before investing township funds. The commissioners Monday night tabled a resolution that would have authorized the finance director to invest in the Pennsylvania Local Government Investment Trust (PLGIT), whose rates are sometimes higher than those of a commercial bank. Despite assurances from Commissioner George M. Aman 3d that the trust "is safer than banks," Commissioner Clinton A. Stuntebeck moved that the resolution be tabled for further discussion.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ralph Allen Sturdivant Sr., 47, of Cedarbrook, , founder and co-owner of a prominent North Philadelphia investment firm, died Friday while scuba diving on vacation with his wife in the Grand Cayman Islands. Mr. Sturdivant was born in Pilesgrove, N.J., and educated in Baltimore public schools. He received a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Morgan State University. He also studied at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. After two years in the Army, where he attained the rank of first lieutenant, Mr. Sturdivant worked for U.S. Steel and then for Merrill Lynch, where he was an account executive.
NEWS
November 11, 2002
Westward ho! That could be the latest rallying cry for housing in Philadelphia thanks to Citizens Bank's new program in and around University City. The news couldn't be more welcome. Not only will the effort build upon the University of Pennsylvania's success in redeveloping that area, it could encourage other lenders to invest in neighborhoods with the potential to go from high-risk to highly desirable. Citizens will make available $28.5 million in grants and low-interest loans for small businesses, and for residents and community groups to buy properties and do renovations.
NEWS
December 16, 2010 | By Christopher K. Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The prices seem reasonable at Relish, a West Oak Lane restaurant that boasts of its "modern Southern cuisine. " Most appetizers are less than $10, entrees less than $20. Taxpayers, however, would see a steeper tab if the menu provided full financial disclosure: that Relish survives with the support of more than $1.1 million in public funds. The restaurant is owned by the Ogontz Avenue Revitalization Corp. (OARC), a nonprofit community-development agency founded by State Rep. Dwight Evans (D., Phila.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Middle-class parents of children with disabilities: There's a new low-cost, tax-advantaged way to save money on their behalf. Low cost is the key idea here. ABLE accounts serve a purpose similar to the special-needs trusts often set up to help disabled or special-needs children without disqualifying them from government benefits. ABLE accounts don't replace special-needs trusts. They are another option. In December, President Obama signed the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE)
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
With the onset of the 2015 tax-filing season, here are cautionary tales of a man and a woman whom you don't want preparing your taxes. The Department of Justice and the Internal Revenue Service highlight some of the brightest red flags among fraudulent tax preparers. These two local folks were doozies. In 2013, "Archie" - full name, Adekunle Adetayo Adeolu - was sentenced to prison and $135,519 in restitution after filing false tax returns. He operated Adeolu & Okojie, a tax-service business in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2015 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Stocks did pretty well in 2014, but what about 2015? Since nobody knows, many financial experts say it's smart for investors to "rebalance" a portfolio. Here's what that is all about. Bonds, stocks , or other investments that were sleeping dogs last year may jump to the head of the pack next. In managing an IRA, 401(k), or other accounts, it's good to be ready for changes. Do that by rebalancing. The Financial Industry Regulator Authority provides an overview at its site, FINRA.org. Since rebalancing is hard for many people to understand and do, providers such as mutual fund companies offer to do it for you, if you put your money into so-called lifecycle or target-date funds.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
If you've ever wondered about unanticipated ways in which your charitable giving pays off, here's one to think about. We asked the Make-a-Wish Foundation about some of the folks who have been granted wishes while seriously ill. Did anyone notice a long-term impact on the illness, or on his or her outlook on life? It turns out that a report on adults who were granted wishes as children found that the experiences sustained them years after they were cured of their diseases, according to a survey conducted by TCC Group in Philadelphia for the Make-a-Wish Foundation.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
What's another name for student debt consolidator? A new low in scam artists . So here's how not to become a target of "debt relief" companies. Many 2014 college graduates are receiving their first loan bills. Student loans total $1.2 trillion nationally, and about seven million students have defaulted. You don't need to pay anyone to get help with, or to restructure, your federal student loans - period. (Private loans are another matter entirely). Do it yourself for free.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Perhaps you already gave money or charitable gifts in 2014 - or you plan to before year's end. Either way, here are helpful tips in setting up a vehicle for your gift and documenting your donation. First: Keep all paperwork and photos, or face the wrath of the Tax Man. Second: Do your homework on the charity of your choice. Third: Don't wait until the last day of the year. Your gift needs to be in the hands of your chosen charity by December 31 in order for you to reap the tax deduction; donating stocks and bonds, for instances, can take three days to settle.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
I worked for years as a waitress - and thought I would sling hash until I crept into my grave. As a result, I'm a highly scrupulous tipper. My husband insists I'm cheap when we dine out and don't leave 20 percent, even for terrible service. Like the time when the hungover hipster forgot to put in our breakfast order. An hour and a half later, we got our eggs, and she got her next tattoo. Which leads us to holiday tipping, and what's appropriate. Here's a handy-dandy guide - culled from various etiquette authorities - about standard tips at the holidays and year-end 2014, for service folks from pet groomers to mail carriers to housecleaners.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Rubbing shoulders with superstar athletes can be thrilling for mere mortals like myself. (I ran junior-varsity cross-country as a high school senior. Not kidding.) But can professional athletes teach us management skills? Keep your expectations within reason. Increasingly, Philadelphia financial firms are corralling sports executives, professional athletes, and coaches to speak, with the idea that "behind-the-scrimmage line" backstories will uncover secrets to success. Maybe, maybe not. But it's an experience for which Philadelphians are paying big bucks.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
There are savvy shoppers. Then there are holiday crazies - expert, rabid consumers who combine coupons, compare online vs. in-store bargains via smartphone, and put us all to shame. Edgar Dworsky, proprietor of nonprofit consumer advocate ConsumerWorld.org, is among the latter. Here's what he does before buying anything, most especially during this season of shopping insanity, along with tips from some other parties: Chart price history. Start by visiting sites like Shopping.com, Shop.pricespider.com, Pricegrabber.com, and TheFind.com, as well as Google Shopping, Amazon.com, and eBay.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Two childhood memories always stay with me. For several years, my mom asked that we "adopt" families - whom we never met - and supply a full-Monty Christmas, including wrapped gifts, clothes, toys, and a holiday meal. And in the weeks leading up to the holidays, my dad would read Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol to my sister and me. Sometimes, he fell asleep. I remember these as the greatest gifts they ever gave us. With hard-core, ugly-sweater-shopping season approaching in advance of Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanzaa, how do we avoid the urge to buy more stuff no one needs?
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