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BUSINESS
May 5, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Private-equity investors, excited by the growth and merger prospects in security, are combining the nation's largest security-guard services into a single, giant company. In the merger, announced Tuesday, AlliedBarton Security Services, the Conshohocken company that employs 60,000 contract security guards nationwide, plans to merge with Universal Services of America, a Santa Ana, Calif., rival with 80,000 workers (including janitors and security guards), later this year. The combined AlliedUniversal will have sales of $4.5 billion a year.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Turner Investments plans to merge its investment-advisory platform with that of Michael Kennedy 's Radnor-based Veracen L.P ., in a proposal to use the shrunken Berwyn-based mutual-fund group founded by stock-picker Robert E. Turner to build a larger, more automated investment-management firm, according to privately circulated documents obtained by the Inquirer. If the deal goes through as planned later this month, Turner will also seek to raise $12.5 million from private investors to fund rapid expansion, according to an "investor presentation" dated June 30 and shown to potential investors.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2006 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investors who sued the federal government in 1993 for breaking its promises in its seizure of Meritor Savings Bank won a judgment yesterday of $371.7 million, but it could be several more years before they see the money. U.S. Claims Court Judge Loren A. Smith wrote that Meritor investors have strong arguments to receive an additional $402 million, but said he would leave that question to an appeal of his award. Justice Department spokesman Charles Miller said the government was still reviewing the decision, and hasn't decided how to respond.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many financial advisors have the same advice for nervous investors unhinged by the stock market's wild mood swings in recent days: Take a deep breath. Come in off the ledge. Don't panic. "The worst thing somebody can do is to sell into a panic," said Alexander F. Cabot, an analyst for the Wiley Group, a Conshohocken wealth advisory firm. Thursday's 500-point Dow plunge, followed by Friday's whipsaw ride between positive and negative territory, might induce the risk-averse to head for the exits.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | By David Johnston, Inquirer Staff Writer
After months of uncertainty about the future of the money-losing Claridge Hotel & Casino, it appeared yesterday that buyers with sufficiently deep pockets and a willingness to risk what's in them will buy the gambling hall. Al Luciani, who as a state assistant attorney general drafted the New Jersey Casino Control Act, said he and four investors have an exclusive agreement, good for the next two weeks, to negotiate for the purchase of the Claridge. Luciani said he is confident a definitive agreement can be negotiated "in a few days.
NEWS
June 24, 2008 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Haddon Heights man pleaded guilty in federal court in Camden yesterday to scamming millions from investors who believed his company had a government defense contract to ship military equipment overseas. Instead, prosecutors said, Glyn Richards was operating a classic Ponzi scheme, in which investors were promised quick returns on their money. Richards told people who invested in his Audubon company, All Freight Logistics, that they would receive a 44 percent return within a few months, according to court records.
REAL_ESTATE
January 17, 1988 | By Charles V. Zehren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Real estate investors are increasingly ignoring Groucho Marx's dictum that it's not worth joining any club that would have you as a member. In fact, interest in real estate investing clubs is on the rise, leaders of area groups said last week. The clubs have been around for years, hitting peak popularity in the early to mid-1980s, when disciples of such real estate gurus as Albert Lowry and Robert Allen regularly gathered to worship before the no-money-down altar. But the flock has dwindled over the last two years, as the prophets fell from financial grace amid much bad press, said Richard R. Hamilton, president of the Indiana Real Estate Club and director of properties for Mark O. Haroldsen Inc. of Salt Lake City, which advises clubs all over the country.
NEWS
December 20, 2012
WHEN INVESTING, it's smart to seek out companies with competitive advantages. But you can develop your own competitive advantage over other investors by reading. Here are two highly regarded classics for your own bookshelf or for holiday-gift-giving consideration: *  One Up on Wall Street by Peter Lynch (Simon & Schuster, $16). Arguably the most engaging investment book ever written. If you've never read it, stop everything and pick up a copy. It could change your life. Advocating buying great companies for the long term, Lynch believes that "any normal person using the customary 3 percent of the brain can pick stocks just as well, if not better than the average Wall Street analyst.
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | By Janet L. Fix and Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writers Inquirer staff writer Barbara Demick contributed to this article
Whether wary of making the wrong move or weary of market uncertainty, small investors seemed to sit tight yesterday and wait out what some had feared would be the Black Monday of 1989. It was a shrewd move. History did not repeat itself. Rather than dropping 508 points as it had on Oct. 19, 1987, the Dow Jones industrial average, after taking an early-morning plunge, rose 88.12 points by the time the bell ended trading in the stock market. Retail brokers had feared that a nasty nose dive yesterday and memories of the market's erratic behavior in the year after the 1987 crash would destroy any chance they had of wooing small investors back to the market.
NEWS
December 4, 2000
Today, fewer than half of the 60 million employees with long-term investment accounts have held them 10 or more years. Over the next decade, another 30 million will reach that level. Seen in that light, the 2000 election was a mere breaker to a looming tidal wave of investor sentiment.. . . Compared to participants in work-based plans, portfolio owners with individual stocks develop a capitalist ideology rapidly. [The Zogby poll] found that this cohort, after one to five years, is already 43 percent Republican (vs. 34 percent Democrat)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Kairos Real Estate Partners of King of Prussia and Chevy Chase, Md.-based Artemis Real Estate Partners have acquired a 123,440-square-foot office building at 518 East Township Line Road in Blue Bell. The building is 27-percent leased by New York-based construction company Skanska USA and Phoenixville Hospital, Kairos said in a release. The buyers plan renovations to the site that include adding a cafe, conference rooms and a fitness center, Kairos said. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Ira M. Saligman, 53, of Wayne, an aviator, philanthropist, and real estate investor, died Sunday, July 31, of injuries he had sustained six days earlier when his vintage aircraft caught fire as it landed in West Mifflin, Pa. Mr. Saligman got out of the airplane at Allegheny County Airport, but died in the Mercy burn unit at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The cause of the fire in the World War II-era plane, as it pulled to a stop on the tarmac, was unknown. Mr. Saligman was en route to an air show in Oshkosh, Wis., where he intended to meet his pilot friends.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Chemours , the chemical maker spun off by DuPont last year with some of that company's dirtiest industrial plants, has decided to stay put in Wilmington. CEO Mark Vergnano cited the corporate-tax reductions passed by the Democratic legislature and signed by Gov. Jack Markell in the "Delaware Competes Act" as a reason not to move to New Jersey or Pennsylvania. "This legislation isn't about Chemours specifically," Markell spokeswoman Courtney McGregor told me. As DuPont fragments, the state has stepped up efforts to keep not just Chemours but also two other planned DuPont successor companies from fleeing, the way paint-making spin-off Axalta moved its headquarters to Philadelphia two years ago. Delaware used to tax business operations: The more you had, the more you paid.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Vanguard closed to new shareholders one of its most popular dividend mutual funds Thursday, saying it topped out at $30 billion as yield-hungry investors sought to earn income on their portfolios. Current investors in the Vanguard Dividend Growth Fund can still put money in, but new investors are out of luck. It's yet another sign that dividend-paying stocks have become the new bonds. Currently, 300 of the S&P 500 index companies yield more than the 10-year Treasury note, a phenomenon that has not occurred since 2009, according to data from asset-management firm Nuveen.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
We investors are suffering a bizarre new phenomenon - where banks and governments are "paying" negative interest rates. Negative rates imply that customers actually pay for keeping money in the bank or in sovereign bonds, rather than receiving interest. Negative interest rates in countries such as Germany and Japan are an experiment to stimulate consumer spending. Just last week, Germany sold 10-year bonds yielding negative rates - investors pay the sovereign to hold these fixed-income securities!
BUSINESS
July 7, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Turner Investments plans to merge its investment-advisory platform with that of Michael Kennedy 's Radnor-based Veracen L.P ., in a proposal to use the shrunken Berwyn-based mutual-fund group founded by stock-picker Robert E. Turner to build a larger, more automated investment-management firm, according to privately circulated documents obtained by the Inquirer. If the deal goes through as planned later this month, Turner will also seek to raise $12.5 million from private investors to fund rapid expansion, according to an "investor presentation" dated June 30 and shown to potential investors.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Mozido, an Austin, Texas-based digital-payments company with a couple of prominent Philadelphians on its board, ranks among the venture-capital-backed private tech companies known as "unicorns" in Silicon Valley: Blue-chip investors have pushed the firm's implied stock-market value above $2 billion. The firm has developed a "mobile wallet" for digital payments by smartphone. Dunkin' Donuts and Dairy Queen use Mozido apps. Mozido has announced acquisitions and partnerships abroad.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A former Philadelphia stockbroker pleaded guilty Wednesday to securities fraud and related charges for taking about $3 million from investors for a nonexistent import business and other ventures. William Bucci, 59, told people he was going to import high-end olive oil and wine from Italy, and promised other investment ventures. He also induced people to loan him money for a Jersey Shore house. But, according to prosecutors, he used the money mostly for his own expenses. Bucci, who lives in the city but worked in the suburbs, paid back some early investors in part with money he received from later lenders.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
John Spagnola, the Philadelphia Eagles' star tight end and players' union rep in the 1980s, has built a post-NFL career as paid advisor to public-employer and union pension plans in Pennsylvania, which has more publicly funded retirement plans than anywhere. He is a managing director at Philadelphia-based PFM, a municipal finance consultant, with 530 employees nationwide, which ranks among the largest pension advisors firms. Clients include 82 Pennsylvania towns and agencies (West Chester and Upper Moreland, among others)
BUSINESS
May 16, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Will robo-advisers fully replace human financial advisers, because they're cheaper and more efficient? No way. And those who think so misunderstand what financial advisers do. "My clients pay me for advice, a holistic financial and retirement plan," as well as referrals to experts in trust and estate planning, said Michael Kitces, who runs a financial planning firm and follows the robo-adviser field. He's a huge fan of robos, which offer automated portfolio management, as well as automatic saving and investing and cutting-edge adviser software.
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