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Invisible Children

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NEWS
October 4, 2007 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
In 2003, three young filmmakers from California traveled to northern Uganda, where they saw the results of a 21-year-old civil war, a conflict in which many of the solders were abducted children. They came back with a documentary, bringing national attention to the crisis. Four years later, the film, Invisible Children, has launched the nonprofit Invisible Children Inc., which sends road teams of volunteers across the country, showing the film and follow-up clips updating the situation in Uganda while explaining what can be done.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stop a brutal thug who has killed, raped, and terrorized children for decades. Why would anyone take issue with that goal? But a cyclone of controversy is swirling around Kony 2012 , a video by a San Diego-based nonprofit called Invisible Children. The video targets brutal Ugandan-born militia leader Joseph Kony and has gotten more than 76 million views on YouTube since it was posted March 5. Some say that Invisible Children's leaders are a bunch of self-promoting, overprivileged young adults, others that they are brilliant filmmaker/advocates who know how to use new-media tools to grab the attention of high school and college students.
NEWS
March 10, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
KAMPALA, Uganda - The wildly successful viral video campaign to raise global awareness about a brutal central Africa rebel leader is drawing criticism from some Ugandans who said Friday the 30-minute video misrepresented the complicated history of Africa's longest-running conflict. The campaign by the advocacy group Invisible Children to make militia leader Joseph Kony a household name received enormous attention on YouTube and other Internet sites this week. But critics in Uganda said the video glossed over the complicated history that made it possible for Kony to achieve the notoriety he has today.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
KAMPALA, Uganda - The wildly successful viral video campaign to raise global awareness about a brutal central Africa rebel leader is drawing criticism from some Ugandans who said Friday that the 30-minute video misrepresented the complicated history of Africa's longest-running conflict. The campaign by the advocacy group Invisible Children to make militia leader Joseph Kony a household name received enormous attention on YouTube and other Internet sites during the week. But critics in Uganda said the video glossed over the complicated history that made it possible for Kony to achieve the notoriety he has today.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
A Wilmington, Del., man is among those killed Sunday in a pair of bombings in Uganda that officials believe were carried out by Islamic extremists. Nate Henn, 25, worked with Invisible Children, a San Diego-based organization that publicizes the plight of child soldiers in East Africa and helps former youth combatants. On his Facebook page, Henn lists Wilmington as his hometown and said he was a 2007 graduate of the University of Delaware and a 2003 graduate of Concord High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2012 | By John Timpane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If we made a video about today's media world, we could title it Truthiness, MMXII - and watch it go viral. On Thursday, the advocacy group Invisible Children Inc. was scheduled to post online the sequel to the spectacular and notorious viral video Kony 2012, about Ugandan strongman Joseph Kony. Kony 2012 started a wildfire controversy over Invisible Children and whether it's telling the truth or rather sensationalizing to attract supporters. Will Kony 2012 Part II throw gunpowder on the fire?
NEWS
April 7, 2006
If you'd like to take a stand tomorrow for protecting children in Philadelphia and in northern Uganda you can do so by taking a walk, by taking up a paint brush or taking a friend to a movie. The All Join Hands: Visions of Peace Project will hold a community paint day tomorrow from noon to 3 p.m. at 1215 Germantown Ave. Adults and kids are welcome to join this project - cosponsored by the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, The Inquirer Editorial Board, the Philadelphia School District and the city's Department of Human Services.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six of 15 missionaries from Selinsgrove who went to Uganda June 16 to help build a wall around a church and school were due to return home July 7 but stayed to complete the work, a church spokesman said today. The six had reasoned that "we've got time. We'll just stay," according to Gerald Wolgemuth, director of communications for the Susquehanna Conference of the United Methodist Church. While nine members of the team arrived home July 7 in Pennsylvania, the others' decision proved fateful: They were at a garden restaurant Sunday in Kampala watching the final match of the World Cup when terrorists set off a bomb beneath a table.
NEWS
July 29, 1987 | By Arlene Martin, Special to The Inquirer
Like everyone else, Barbara Finkelstein has dreams. For years her dream was to escape the chicken farm in Atco where she grew up. She would go to New York and become a famous writer. She would escape the suffocating life on the farm. She would be free. Now, at 34, Finkelstein, recently married to a Manhattan executive, is a writer in New York. And her first novel, Summer Long-a-coming, was published in May by Harper & Row. But she has yet to escape the farm. Her novel, the story of Brantzche Szuster, 15, and her family, takes place on a chicken farm in southern New Jersey in the summer of 1968, and while the plot is fiction, Brantzche has much in common with Finkelstein and her experiences growing up in Atco.
NEWS
June 5, 2011
By Tayari Jones Algonquin Books. 352 pp. $19.95 Reviewed by Mike Fischer It may not match "Call me Ishmael," but one could do worse than opening a novel with "My father, James Witherspoon, is a bigamist. " That's how Tayari Jones begins Silver Sparrow , her third novel, which chronicles two African American families in Jones' native Atlanta. James may be the common denominator joining those families together, but Silver Sparrow belongs to his two daughters, born four months apart in 1969.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2012 | By John Timpane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If we made a video about today's media world, we could title it Truthiness, MMXII - and watch it go viral. On Thursday, the advocacy group Invisible Children Inc. was scheduled to post online the sequel to the spectacular and notorious viral video Kony 2012, about Ugandan strongman Joseph Kony. Kony 2012 started a wildfire controversy over Invisible Children and whether it's telling the truth or rather sensationalizing to attract supporters. Will Kony 2012 Part II throw gunpowder on the fire?
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stop a brutal thug who has killed, raped, and terrorized children for decades. Why would anyone take issue with that goal? But a cyclone of controversy is swirling around Kony 2012 , a video by a San Diego-based nonprofit called Invisible Children. The video targets brutal Ugandan-born militia leader Joseph Kony and has gotten more than 76 million views on YouTube since it was posted March 5. Some say that Invisible Children's leaders are a bunch of self-promoting, overprivileged young adults, others that they are brilliant filmmaker/advocates who know how to use new-media tools to grab the attention of high school and college students.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
KAMPALA, Uganda - The wildly successful viral video campaign to raise global awareness about a brutal central Africa rebel leader is drawing criticism from some Ugandans who said Friday that the 30-minute video misrepresented the complicated history of Africa's longest-running conflict. The campaign by the advocacy group Invisible Children to make militia leader Joseph Kony a household name received enormous attention on YouTube and other Internet sites during the week. But critics in Uganda said the video glossed over the complicated history that made it possible for Kony to achieve the notoriety he has today.
NEWS
March 10, 2012 | By Rodney Muhumuza, Associated Press
KAMPALA, Uganda - The wildly successful viral video campaign to raise global awareness about a brutal central Africa rebel leader is drawing criticism from some Ugandans who said Friday the 30-minute video misrepresented the complicated history of Africa's longest-running conflict. The campaign by the advocacy group Invisible Children to make militia leader Joseph Kony a household name received enormous attention on YouTube and other Internet sites this week. But critics in Uganda said the video glossed over the complicated history that made it possible for Kony to achieve the notoriety he has today.
NEWS
June 5, 2011
By Tayari Jones Algonquin Books. 352 pp. $19.95 Reviewed by Mike Fischer It may not match "Call me Ishmael," but one could do worse than opening a novel with "My father, James Witherspoon, is a bigamist. " That's how Tayari Jones begins Silver Sparrow , her third novel, which chronicles two African American families in Jones' native Atlanta. James may be the common denominator joining those families together, but Silver Sparrow belongs to his two daughters, born four months apart in 1969.
NEWS
July 15, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leader of a team of Pennsylvania missionaries who were injured in Sunday's terror bombings in Uganda has written a firsthand account of the episode. "I remember a bright flash, and everything went gray and it felt like rain," Lori Ssebulime of Selinsgrove wrote from Kampala, replying on her blog to questions from The Inquirer. "I heard screaming from every direction. " Ssebulime was still in Africa on Wednesday, monitoring the medical care of the five team members wounded by one of two blasts that killed 76 people.
NEWS
July 13, 2010 | By Angela Couloumbis and Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writers
SELINSGROVE, Pa. - When nine of their colleagues flew home last week, five missionaries from this north-central Pennsylvania community stayed in Uganda to work at an urgent task. They hoped to finish a wall protecting their sister congregation's church and school in Kampala - in particular, one missionary said, to shield children from a scourge that haunts Uganda: ritual child sacrifice. "We've got time. We'll just stay. " That was how Gerald Wolgemuth, director of communications for the Susquehanna Conference of the United Methodist Church, described the volunteers' reasoning.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six of 15 missionaries from Selinsgrove who went to Uganda June 16 to help build a wall around a church and school were due to return home July 7 but stayed to complete the work, a church spokesman said today. The six had reasoned that "we've got time. We'll just stay," according to Gerald Wolgemuth, director of communications for the Susquehanna Conference of the United Methodist Church. While nine members of the team arrived home July 7 in Pennsylvania, the others' decision proved fateful: They were at a garden restaurant Sunday in Kampala watching the final match of the World Cup when terrorists set off a bomb beneath a table.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
A Wilmington, Del., man is among those killed Sunday in a pair of bombings in Uganda that officials believe were carried out by Islamic extremists. Nate Henn, 25, worked with Invisible Children, a San Diego-based organization that publicizes the plight of child soldiers in East Africa and helps former youth combatants. On his Facebook page, Henn lists Wilmington as his hometown and said he was a 2007 graduate of the University of Delaware and a 2003 graduate of Concord High School.
NEWS
October 4, 2007 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
In 2003, three young filmmakers from California traveled to northern Uganda, where they saw the results of a 21-year-old civil war, a conflict in which many of the solders were abducted children. They came back with a documentary, bringing national attention to the crisis. Four years later, the film, Invisible Children, has launched the nonprofit Invisible Children Inc., which sends road teams of volunteers across the country, showing the film and follow-up clips updating the situation in Uganda while explaining what can be done.
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