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Iowa Republican Party

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NEWS
June 23, 1994 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
The 1996 presidential campaign begins unofficially tomorrow in Iowa and U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., will be there. He and six other possible GOP contenders will speak at the Iowa Republican Party's state convention tomorrow night in Des Moines. Between 1,500 and 2,000 people who paid $25 each to attend will then vote on their choice for president. The straw poll foreshadows Iowa's first-in-the-nation party caucuses, which will be held in January 1996. But Specter insists tomorrow's trip doesn't mean he's running for president - even though this will be his third trip to Iowa.
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | By REGINALD STUART, Daily News Staff Writer
When Iowans turn out tonight for Democratic and Republican precinct caucuses, they will meet in fire halls, churches, bank lobbies and even in the homes of some party regulars. All together, there will be 4,974 voting precinct caucus meetings, equally divided between the two parties, in the state's 99 counties. They will start at 7 p.m. CST (8 p.m. Philadelphia time). Beyond that, the Democratic and Republican caucuses are worlds apart in process and what the results might mean.
NEWS
March 27, 2011 | By Mike Glover, Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa - A handful of high-profile Republicans who may be eyeing the White House told hundreds of conservative activists Saturday that most Americans agreed with their values, and insisted that opposition to the president's health-care overhaul could help the GOP make historic gains in 2012. Rep. Michele Bachmann, a tea party favorite, got the noisiest reception when she told about 500 people gathered in Des Moines that voters were ready to overturn the federal health-care law and oust President Obama during next year's election.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
AMES, Iowa - The Ames Straw Poll is many things: state fair with carnival rides, political convention, fundraiser for the Iowa Republican Party, test of a candidate's organizational strength, and what some might describe as an institutionalized if genteel day of bribery. But the quirky poll, in which only six of the nine declared Republican presidential contenders are participating Saturday, is also testimony to the paradoxical ability of Iowans, who pride themselves on their modesty, to capture the media spotlight.
NEWS
January 4, 2012
By John Nichols The Republicans who would be president, the super-PACs, and the surrogates had already spent more than $12 million on television ads - almost half of them negative - before the final weekend leading up to Tuesday's Iowa caucuses. That doesn't count thousands of radio ads, mailings, lighted billboards in Des Moines, and the cost of staff. Add it all up and there is a good chance that, when all is said and done, the candidates will have spent $200 per vote to influence the roughly 110,000 Iowans who were expected to participate in the Republican caucuses.
NEWS
September 29, 2011 | By Lesley Clark and David Lightman, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The nation's Republican presidential primary season could be bumping up against New Year's Day, as states seeking to boost their political clout look to set earlier contests. Florida's 2012 Republican presidential primary could be scheduled for as early as Jan. 31, which most likely would prompt the states that traditionally have gone early to move up their own contests. Florida House Speaker Dean Cannon told the St. Petersburg Times on Wednesday that the state's primary date selection committee would meet Friday and was likely to choose Jan. 31. Florida had been looking at an early March date - after Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS
INDIANOLA, IOWA - Fresh from his adopted home at an Iowa farm, would-be president Rick Santorum wore cowboy boots and jeans when he walked into a worn-at-the-edges corner store on the square of this small town looking for help. "People in Iowa have a huge say in who's going to be president," the former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania told a dozen Republicans sipping coffee. "Iowa doesn't pick the president, but it does pick the field. " Indeed. Starting with a debate tomorrow in Iowa and a make-or-break straw poll in the state Saturday, the coming stretch will test candidates, messages and machinery; elevate some to the top tier of media attention and money, and drive the race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination heading into the fall.
NEWS
August 31, 1995 | BY DONALD KAUL
I'm beginning to think it's time to pull the plug on the Iowa caucuses. The New Hampshire primary, too, for that matter. I say that regretfully. I have always been a defender of those twin events, which traditionally kick off the presidential nominating process. When people would argue that Iowa and New Hampshire were unrepresentative - small, white-bread states with few of the problems that face the rest of the country - I would counter with: "Yes, but there is a wholesomeness to the electoral process there that doesn't exist in other states.
NEWS
February 10, 1988 | By Lee Bandy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Iowa caucuses have provided an answer to the question asked by political experts since Pat Robertson entered the Republican presidential race last October: Is he for real? The answer, apparently, is yes. "I'll never underestimate that guy again," commented a disappointed Lee Atwater, campaign manager for George Bush, who was stunned to finish third behind Robertson and Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas. "I don't see how Robertson can be called anything else other than a viable candidate," said Eddie Mahe, a Republican consultant who is not working for any presidential candidate.
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NEWS
January 4, 2012
By John Nichols The Republicans who would be president, the super-PACs, and the surrogates had already spent more than $12 million on television ads - almost half of them negative - before the final weekend leading up to Tuesday's Iowa caucuses. That doesn't count thousands of radio ads, mailings, lighted billboards in Des Moines, and the cost of staff. Add it all up and there is a good chance that, when all is said and done, the candidates will have spent $200 per vote to influence the roughly 110,000 Iowans who were expected to participate in the Republican caucuses.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By Steven Thomma, McClatchy Newspapers
DES MOINES, Iowa - He could easily win the Iowa precinct caucuses Tuesday, which kick off the voting for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination. Yet Ron Paul is largely getting a free pass from his rivals and their supporters, the only top-tier candidate who is escaping the high-profile attack ads flooding the state's airwaves. Why? Because none of his competitors sees the Texas congressman as a serious long-term rival for the nomination. One, Mitt Romney, sees a Paul win in Iowa as the next best thing to a Romney win, something that would deny an Iowa launching pad for a more serious long-term challenger such as Newt Gingrich or Rick Perry.
NEWS
September 29, 2011 | By Lesley Clark and David Lightman, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The nation's Republican presidential primary season could be bumping up against New Year's Day, as states seeking to boost their political clout look to set earlier contests. Florida's 2012 Republican presidential primary could be scheduled for as early as Jan. 31, which most likely would prompt the states that traditionally have gone early to move up their own contests. Florida House Speaker Dean Cannon told the St. Petersburg Times on Wednesday that the state's primary date selection committee would meet Friday and was likely to choose Jan. 31. Florida had been looking at an early March date - after Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
AMES, Iowa - The Ames Straw Poll is many things: state fair with carnival rides, political convention, fundraiser for the Iowa Republican Party, test of a candidate's organizational strength, and what some might describe as an institutionalized if genteel day of bribery. But the quirky poll, in which only six of the nine declared Republican presidential contenders are participating Saturday, is also testimony to the paradoxical ability of Iowans, who pride themselves on their modesty, to capture the media spotlight.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
AMES, Iowa - At Rep. Michele Bachmann's encampment Saturday, people lined up for corn dogs, Frisbee-size cinnamon rolls, and a chance to slip into an air-conditioned circus tent to listen to country music star Randy Travis play for an hour. Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum drew them in with homemade peach preserves; Buddy Holly's old band, the Crickets; and bagpipers who played stirring airs right out of Braveheart . Texas Rep. Ron Paul had a massive tent city right next to the bus parking lot and served barbecue in a battalion-size mess hall.
NEWS
August 13, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
AMES, Iowa - At Rep. Michele Bachmann's encampment Saturday, people lined up for corn dogs, Frisbee-sized cinnamon rolls, and a chance to slip into an air-conditioned circus tent to listen to country music star Randy Travis play for an hour. Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum drew them in with homemade peach preserves; Buddy Holly's old band, the Crickets; and bagpipers who played stirring airs right out of Braveheart . Texas Rep. Ron Paul had a massive tent city right next to the bus parking lot, and served barbecue in a battalion-sized mess hall.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS
INDIANOLA, IOWA - Fresh from his adopted home at an Iowa farm, would-be president Rick Santorum wore cowboy boots and jeans when he walked into a worn-at-the-edges corner store on the square of this small town looking for help. "People in Iowa have a huge say in who's going to be president," the former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania told a dozen Republicans sipping coffee. "Iowa doesn't pick the president, but it does pick the field. " Indeed. Starting with a debate tomorrow in Iowa and a make-or-break straw poll in the state Saturday, the coming stretch will test candidates, messages and machinery; elevate some to the top tier of media attention and money, and drive the race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination heading into the fall.
NEWS
March 27, 2011 | By Mike Glover, Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa - A handful of high-profile Republicans who may be eyeing the White House told hundreds of conservative activists Saturday that most Americans agreed with their values, and insisted that opposition to the president's health-care overhaul could help the GOP make historic gains in 2012. Rep. Michele Bachmann, a tea party favorite, got the noisiest reception when she told about 500 people gathered in Des Moines that voters were ready to overturn the federal health-care law and oust President Obama during next year's election.
NEWS
March 10, 2010 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
DES MOINES, Iowa - Former Sen. Rick Santorum declared "a turning point in America" yesterday to a crowd of conservative Republican voters who help launch presidential elections from this early caucus state. Santorum preached to the flock on issues close to their political hearts, promising a battle against terrorism, abortion rights and same-sex marriage. That last issue has drawn true ire here since the Iowa Supreme Court last April declared a ban on same-sex marriages unconstitutional, clearing the way for Iowa to become the first state outside the Northeast to allow gays to marry.
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