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NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Senior Writer
IOWA CITY, Iowa - Sitting outside a barn at the county fairgrounds late Saturday afternoon, waiting for her candidate to arrive at a Democratic barbecue, Raina Lourens was explaining the round, blue "Hillary" sticker on her dress. "A few months ago, I don't think I would have been wearing it," said Lourens, 29, a medical student. "I sort of wanted her at the beginning because she was the woman. Now I see her as the candidate with the best answers and the best programs, including the most realistic plan to improve the health-care system.
NEWS
August 17, 1999
The presidential field for 2000 just lost a well-qualified contender, Lamar Alexander of Tennessee. The former governor, university president and U.S. Secretary of Education dropped out yesterday after trailing five fellow Republicans at a quadrennial party fund-raiser known as the Iowa straw poll. Mr. Alexander never found a distinctive niche. He had worked to improve education, but so had the newcomer with the $36 million war chest: Texas Gov. George W. Bush. The Tennessean backed a Reaganesque, two-tax-rate code - 15 percent and 28 percent - but that must have seemed dull compared to the simplistic, flat tax of Steve Forbes.
NEWS
February 12, 1996 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
They've been barraged by millions of dollars of vicious ads, witnessed countless personal attacks. Now, Iowans get to respond to the presidential candidates who have been wooing them and bashing one another as voters head to churches, schools and meeting halls to participate in caucuses tonight. While even his rivals concede that Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole is the odds-on favorite to win the Republican skirmish, several candidates have been jockeying for the second-place slot in a seemingly tight Republican race that marks the first crucial political test of the election year.
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill Higdon is a native Iowan, a minister and the president of Graceland College, whose bucolic, rolling campus here near the Missouri line is serenely salted with frost. In such a setting from such a man, one does not expect what used to be, well, heresy around these parts. "I wouldn't fight the Civil War all over again to be first," he said, smiling. "I really don't care. " He is talking about the Iowa caucuses, the first testing ground of presidential candidates. He is saying that maybe being first isn't all it's cracked up to be. And he isn't saying that alone.
NEWS
March 11, 1987
I suppose that as a loyal son of the Hawkeye State I should dash off an indignant response to your editorial, "Leave Iowa to the hogs. " I could point out, for example, that, although "atypically white," Iowans would give a black presidential candidate a warmer welcome and fairer hearing than he would receive in many neighborhoods in Philadelphia. And I could add that, although "atypically rural," Iowans know far more about life beyond the borders of their state than most Easterners know about life beyond megalopolis.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | By REGINALD STUART, Daily News Staff Writer
The folks at the Crouse Cafe, where the roast beef and gravy platters rival Philadelphia's cheesesteaks, like to consider the place a barometer of the mood of this Farm Belt state. The popular dining spot is where farmers in overalls and bankers in business suits share their views on the issues of the day. It is also a stopover for many of the presidential candidates who have made working the small-town crowds part of their Iowa campaigns. "Everybody right now is talking about the caucuses," said Bobby Crouse, as he took a break from the grill at the family-owned restaurant.
NEWS
January 4, 2012
By John Nichols The Republicans who would be president, the super-PACs, and the surrogates had already spent more than $12 million on television ads - almost half of them negative - before the final weekend leading up to Tuesday's Iowa caucuses. That doesn't count thousands of radio ads, mailings, lighted billboards in Des Moines, and the cost of staff. Add it all up and there is a good chance that, when all is said and done, the candidates will have spent $200 per vote to influence the roughly 110,000 Iowans who were expected to participate in the Republican caucuses.
NEWS
December 28, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Senate Republican leader Robert Dole and Vice President George Bush are almost even in Iowa's Republican presidential caucuses, according to a poll by the Des Moines Register. The poll found Dole the first choice of 37 percent of Iowans who say they are likely to attend the caucuses, while Bush was the first choice of 33 percent. Because the poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 5.5 percent, "It is unclear which of the top GOP candidates is ahead," the newspaper said.
NEWS
March 4, 1987
I found your Feb. 25 editorial on the presidential selection process most annoying. The editorial described the Iowa caucus participants' power "to decide which of the plethora of Republican and Democratic presidential candidates will be taken seriously. " What the editorial did not mention was the true source of this influence. In reality, any power the voters of Iowa have is derived from the enormous exposure their delegate selection process is given by the television networks and newspapers such as The Inquirer.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time, in a struggling town where the land is poor and the skies are fickle, Judy Bierkamp was besieged by suitors - ambitious men itching for glory, angling for a meal. They wooed her, they stroked her, they said they'd remember her when. Jesse Jackson rocked in her chair. Dick Gephardt slept in her guest room. Reubin Askew, the Florida governor, raided her icebox. And Michael Dukakis . . . well, let Bierkamp tell that story. It happened four winters ago, back when Iowans were masters of the political universe, playing host to 10 Democratic candidates and 3,000 reporters.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Dana Milbank
Just a few hours before the Iowa caucuses opened on Tuesday, Don Acheson, a general contractor from West Des Moines, remained as he had been for months: wracked by indecision. First he had been for Rick Perry, then Newt Gingrich. When I caught up with him, he was preparing to give Rick Santorum a hard look, but Mitt Romney was "not far behind" in his esteem. "This late in the game, I've never been undecided before," he lamented. "This probably is the most bizarre caucus I've been to. " His drift was typical, and revealing.
NEWS
January 4, 2012
By John Nichols The Republicans who would be president, the super-PACs, and the surrogates had already spent more than $12 million on television ads - almost half of them negative - before the final weekend leading up to Tuesday's Iowa caucuses. That doesn't count thousands of radio ads, mailings, lighted billboards in Des Moines, and the cost of staff. Add it all up and there is a good chance that, when all is said and done, the candidates will have spent $200 per vote to influence the roughly 110,000 Iowans who were expected to participate in the Republican caucuses.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | BY WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
YOU KNOW what they always say - when things are going really good, they name a chicken salad after you. Indeed, these are the chicken-salad days for former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, whose rapid rise to here from obscurity in the Iowa caucus polls was celebrated yesterday when the popular Pizza Ranch outlet in Boone, Iowa, renamed an in-house creation its "Santorum Salad. " Just two weeks ago, there weren't many "naming opportunities" for a stalwart GOP culture warrior who was rejected by Keystone State voters in a landslide five years ago and then seemed mired in Iowa's single digits despite all but moving to the nation's first caucus state.
NEWS
December 26, 2011 | By Thomas Beaumont, Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa - It's been a different presidential race in Iowa this year - quieter. Campaign headquarters have hardly been buzzing with activity, unlike the around-the-clock nature of past contests. Candidates have barely visited the state, compared with years when most all but moved here. And they have largely refrained from building the grassroots armies of yesteryear, in favor of more modest on-the-ground teams of paid staffers and volunteers. The final rush of campaigning here gets under way Monday, just eight days before the Jan. 3 caucuses, and, to be sure, there will be a flurry of candidate appearances and get-out-the-vote efforts all week.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
SAC CITY, Iowa - Rick Santorum should have been holed up in a hotel suite somewhere with a briefing binder and a couple of aides last Thursday, practicing for that night's nationally televised Republican presidential debate. Instead, he was on his second campaign stop of the day, a town-hall meeting at the Sac County Cattle Co., famous for its 16-ounce rib eye called the Dude. "Don't look at the polls," Santorum told 22 supporters and potential converts, speaking above the squeaking hinges of the kitchen doors at lunchtime.
NEWS
July 31, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
DES MOINES, Iowa - The star of the show, Gov. Christie, spoke without a hint he was following a script. The supporting cast, including a prospective first lady, a deep-pocketed brother, and two teenage children, learned where to stand on the stage. The three acts, from the speech to the news conference to the fund-raiser, were choreographed with exactness. The setting Monday was Iowa, which holds the first vote in the nation for president. Christie, in town for an education speech, stole some headlines from the presidential contenders as he repeated that he wasn't a Republican candidate.
NEWS
October 11, 2010
A no-limit credit card in the name of the toll payers: That used to be only a metaphor for the Delaware River Port Authority's approach to public finance. Now it turns out to be a matter of fact. The DRPA's top managers racked up $38,000 in corporate credit-card charges in a little more than a year, The Inquirer reported last week, including stays at the Waldorf-Astoria and lunches at the Palm. Were these guys running a bank or just a few bridges? The stays at the Waldorf, which with parking cost commuters more than $600 a night, allowed two agency executives to attend the annual gathering of the Pennsylvania Society, a political elbow-rubbing extravaganza.
NEWS
May 27, 2009
YOUR May 19 Page 1 article wrongly described one of the biggest stories in 2009 as "the surge in American public approval" for same-sex marriage. Truth is, the real surge of approval has been to support marriage between one man and one woman. Any state legalizing same-sex marriage has done so through judicial or political activism, not the will of the citizens. The story cited Iowa's recent actions for this assertion. Was it a surge of Iowans' approval that overturned their long-standing marriage laws?
NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
Sitting outside a barn at the county fairgrounds late Saturday afternoon, waiting for her candidate to arrive at a Democratic barbecue, Raina Lourens was explaining the round, blue "Hillary" sticker on her dress. "A few months ago, I don't think I would have been wearing it," said Lourens, 29, a medical student. "I sort of wanted her at the beginning because she was the woman. Now I see her as the candidate with the best answers and the best programs, including the most realistic plan to improve the health-care system.
NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Senior Writer
IOWA CITY, Iowa - Sitting outside a barn at the county fairgrounds late Saturday afternoon, waiting for her candidate to arrive at a Democratic barbecue, Raina Lourens was explaining the round, blue "Hillary" sticker on her dress. "A few months ago, I don't think I would have been wearing it," said Lourens, 29, a medical student. "I sort of wanted her at the beginning because she was the woman. Now I see her as the candidate with the best answers and the best programs, including the most realistic plan to improve the health-care system.
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