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NEWS
May 27, 2009
YOUR May 19 Page 1 article wrongly described one of the biggest stories in 2009 as "the surge in American public approval" for same-sex marriage. Truth is, the real surge of approval has been to support marriage between one man and one woman. Any state legalizing same-sex marriage has done so through judicial or political activism, not the will of the citizens. The story cited Iowa's recent actions for this assertion. Was it a surge of Iowans' approval that overturned their long-standing marriage laws?
NEWS
December 26, 2011 | By Thomas Beaumont, Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa - It's been a different presidential race in Iowa this year - quieter. Campaign headquarters have hardly been buzzing with activity, unlike the around-the-clock nature of past contests. Candidates have barely visited the state, compared with years when most all but moved here. And they have largely refrained from building the grassroots armies of yesteryear, in favor of more modest on-the-ground teams of paid staffers and volunteers. The final rush of campaigning here gets under way Monday, just eight days before the Jan. 3 caucuses, and, to be sure, there will be a flurry of candidate appearances and get-out-the-vote efforts all week.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | BY WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
YOU KNOW what they always say - when things are going really good, they name a chicken salad after you. Indeed, these are the chicken-salad days for former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, whose rapid rise to here from obscurity in the Iowa caucus polls was celebrated yesterday when the popular Pizza Ranch outlet in Boone, Iowa, renamed an in-house creation its "Santorum Salad. " Just two weeks ago, there weren't many "naming opportunities" for a stalwart GOP culture warrior who was rejected by Keystone State voters in a landslide five years ago and then seemed mired in Iowa's single digits despite all but moving to the nation's first caucus state.
NEWS
April 7, 1996 | By Roland Merullo
The hasty, costly primary season that brought Bob Dole the Republican nomination has raised some important questions about the way we do our political business. To everyone but the advertising directors of TV stations in Des Moines and Manchester, N.H., it seems obviously unfair to marginalize the contribution of a state as populous as Pennsylvania while we continue giving disproportionate influence to votes cast in New Hampshire or Iowa. We have four years now before the next presidential primaries.
NEWS
April 9, 1986 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rep. Richard A. Gephardt, Democrat of Missouri, spent Saturday doing what he has done a lot of recently: thinking about running for president. The man has his own distinctive way of thinking. He began his day of contemplation at 7:30 a.m. by walking into the Country Recipe Restaurant here for a chat with the editor of the local weekly. He downed a cinnamon roll the size of a small farm, then strolled over to the county courthouse to talk to 70 local Democrats. Then he drove to Des Moines, flew across the state to Davenport, drove to Moline, Ill., and finally flew on to Milwaukee for a big Wisconsin Democratic dinner.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
SAC CITY, Iowa - Rick Santorum should have been holed up in a hotel suite somewhere with a briefing binder and a couple of aides last Thursday, practicing for that night's nationally televised Republican presidential debate. Instead, he was on his second campaign stop of the day, a town-hall meeting at the Sac County Cattle Co., famous for its 16-ounce rib eye called the Dude. "Don't look at the polls," Santorum told 22 supporters and potential converts, speaking above the squeaking hinges of the kitchen doors at lunchtime.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many Democrats here, Joyce Lonergan, the Boone County recorder, finds herself thinking a lot about February's presidential caucuses and talking a lot about Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois. "I've narrowed it down to Simon or (Massachusetts Gov. Michael S.) Dukakis," Lonergan said the other night over her ham loaf at a $5-a-plate political dinner at the county fairgrounds. "And I'm really impressed with Simon. He seems very intellectual. "My only reservation about Simon, I suppose, is whether he's electable," she continued.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | by Kent Bottles
Sometimes it takes a relative stranger to point out what is beautiful or bothersome about a person or a place. So the Daily News has launched a series of essays written by newcomers comparing Philadelphia with other cities. And, lifting a line from a Robert Burns poem, we're calling the series "As Others See Us. " I't's been about a year and a half since our family moved from Iowa City to Lower Merion. A different world? You bet. Though whether that's good or bad remains open to debate.
NEWS
August 12, 1989 | By James R. Carroll, Inquirer Washington Bureau
When Mark Sorbe, a farmer in Alta, Iowa, saw an envelope from an area law firm in his mail on Monday, he thought: "What have I done now?" He opened it to discover a surprise: General Electric Aircraft Engines was offering rewards of as much as $50,000 for pieces from the tail engine of the United Airlines DC-10 that crashed July 19 in Sioux City, Iowa. Sorbe, who grows corn and soybeans, has not checked his 1,000 acres for airplane parts, and, as far as he knows, his neighbors who also got letters have not looked either.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
After 41 years operating Archie's, his small, family-owned grocery store in this tiny farming community, Carl Archibald figured he had become a pretty staunch advocate of the free enterprise system. The less government, the better, he had always found. Until last month, that is, when his state government began pulling out of a business it had operated since the end of Prohibition - retail liquor. On March 1, Iowa started closing its 219 state liquor stores. Private businesses have taken over, resulting in higher liquor prices, poorer selection and, in some instances, rural towns left 25 miles from the nearest liquor store.
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