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NEWS
September 17, 1991
Well, to some tastes, Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin's snorting, pawing charge into the presidential race over the weekend, smacked of the sort of cornpone, prairie populism that won't get the Democrats any closer to the White House then they've been in who knows how many years. Frankly, though, we like the way this guy talks: straight, gutsy, passionate, angry. That's not to say we're a ballot in "the Harkin box," as he calls it. Not by a long shot. But we're sick and tired of the wishy-washy, tippy-toeing, don't-stand-for-something, 'fraidie-cat Democrats who've turned their party into pablum, not a choice (to adapt one of his phrases)
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Iowa hog farmer Dean Kleckner was elected yesterday to head the nation's largest farm organization and said that American farmers must "sell to the world" to overcome their worst economic slump since the Great Depression. Kleckner, as head of the 3.4 million-member American Farm Bureau Federation, pledged to continue the bureau's efforts to improve farm income. The 280 voting delegates at the bureau's 67th annual meeting elected Kleckner from a field of seven candidates, including Harry Bell of South Carolina, who was picked for the vice presidency.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | By Kenneth J. Cooper, Inquirer Washington Bureau
There is a Waterloo in Iowa, but Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis wasn't forced to make an unscheduled stop there last week. Dukakis, the third Democratic candidate for president wounded by controversy, maneuvered through most of a three-day trip without having to fight a major battle over the negative campaign tactics of two aides. John Sasso, Dukakis' campaign manager, and Paul Tully, his chief field organizer, resigned Wednesday from the campaign after disclosing that they had circulated the "attack video" about Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D., Del.)
SPORTS
September 17, 1993 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
They come from Davenport, Des Moines, Sioux City and the little farm towns all over the state. They even come from Madison County, the home of those now- famous bridges. Half a dozen Saturdays each autumn, Iowa's football fans converge on this pretty, little college town, hard by the banks of the Iowa River. They come, dressed in black and gold, to scream for their beloved University of Iowa Hawkeyes. They come to Kinnick Stadium, which looks for all the world like a mammoth outdoor version of the Palestra.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The way Margo McNabb sees it, she's striking a blow for grassroots democracy, stoking enthusiasm for the traditional kickoff contest of the presidential campaign. Each night for the last week, starting at 6:30 and ending at 9, the diehard Democrat has worked the bedroom phone in her cluttered green bungalow, urging friends and neighbors in her precinct to brave the chill tomorrow night and vote with their feet for Al Gore. Many won't bother to attend the Iowa Democratic caucuses, but she's working from lists of strong Gore supporters, and she has known some of them for four decades.
NEWS
January 16, 2004 | By Jim Morrill INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
On Monday night, Margaret McReynolds, 82, will step into a school in south Des Moines just after dinner and into the drama of the 2004 presidential race. She will join her neighbors at one of 1,997 Democratic precinct caucuses. She and other Iowa Democrats will cast the first major votes of this year's campaign with their feet, sorting themselves into groups loyal to one of the party candidates. "All the eyes are on you when you walk in," McReynolds said. "They want to see which group you're going to get in. " The Iowa caucuses are a singular form of grass-roots democracy, featuring arcane rules, complex math and last-minute arm-twisting.
NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
Sitting outside a barn at the county fairgrounds late Saturday afternoon, waiting for her candidate to arrive at a Democratic barbecue, Raina Lourens was explaining the round, blue "Hillary" sticker on her dress. "A few months ago, I don't think I would have been wearing it," said Lourens, 29, a medical student. "I sort of wanted her at the beginning because she was the woman. Now I see her as the candidate with the best answers and the best programs, including the most realistic plan to improve the health-care system.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | By DAVID S. BRODER
As Sen. Tom Harkin (D., Iowa) travels the country in his soon-to-be- announced campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, he tells audiences at almost every stop a chilling story about "a friend of mine who worked 23 years for a plant in Des Moines, Iowa, a union guy, in the UAW," the United Auto Workers. "In 23 years, he only missed five days of work, because the snowplows didn't get the snow out. And in 23 years, not one strike. Then the owner got old and he sold it to a group of investors . . . and they wouldn't sign a contract with the union, provoked a strike, brought in the scabs, and they were out of work.
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Morning, my friends!" Patrick J. Buchanan belted out a hearty greeting with his usual pugnacious gusto, slicing like a stiletto through a crowd of admirers in a small farm town. It was only a couple hours past sunup, but the sweet taste of victory had put a spring in his step. And no wonder. Buchanan, the avatar of family values and America First, is making all kinds of mischief in the Republican race. After a surprise victory in the Louisiana caucuses Tuesday night, and a first-place finish in an Alaska straw poll several weeks back, Buchanan is now on the verge of becoming the conservative alternative to Bob Dole and Steve Forbes - by vanquishing Phil Gramm, the lavishly financed rival who had always assumed he would win big in the Bayou.
NEWS
January 19, 2004 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
When Democrats in Iowa vote tonight for a presidential nominee, they will begin a national process to define what it means to be a Democrat in the new century. On the eve of Iowa's vote, the national party appeared far from coalescing around one candidate or one vision of the future. Close competition among several major candidates underscored deep divisions over such issues as taxes, war, and the role of government. Many of these divisions have troubled the Democratic Party since Ronald Reagan shifted the political landscape to the right in 1980.
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