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NEWS
August 8, 1991 | By DAVID S. BRODER
As Sen. Tom Harkin (D., Iowa) travels the country in his soon-to-be- announced campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, he tells audiences at almost every stop a chilling story about "a friend of mine who worked 23 years for a plant in Des Moines, Iowa, a union guy, in the UAW," the United Auto Workers. "In 23 years, he only missed five days of work, because the snowplows didn't get the snow out. And in 23 years, not one strike. Then the owner got old and he sold it to a group of investors . . . and they wouldn't sign a contract with the union, provoked a strike, brought in the scabs, and they were out of work.
NEWS
August 12, 1989 | By James R. Carroll, Inquirer Washington Bureau
When Mark Sorbe, a farmer in Alta, Iowa, saw an envelope from an area law firm in his mail on Monday, he thought: "What have I done now?" He opened it to discover a surprise: General Electric Aircraft Engines was offering rewards of as much as $50,000 for pieces from the tail engine of the United Airlines DC-10 that crashed July 19 in Sioux City, Iowa. Sorbe, who grows corn and soybeans, has not checked his 1,000 acres for airplane parts, and, as far as he knows, his neighbors who also got letters have not looked either.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | By David S. Broder
It is at least time - if not long overdue - for the people to have their say, and this is as good a place as one could find for them to start picking a president. Were it left to me, this is not how we would do it. I would happily go back to the kind of nominating system we had in 1960, the first campaign I covered. We had a few primaries - really only a half-dozen of any consequence - spaced far enough apart so the voters could learn a good deal about the candidates. The parties used those primaries to test the campaigning skills of the presidential aspirants.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Douglas Pike, Inquirer Editorial Board
A few months ago, "Babbitt beats Hart and Jackson in Iowa" might have sounded like a bona fide headline. After all, Gary Hart and Jesse Jackson both led in national polls of Democrats during part of 1987. But tomorrow, former Gov. Bruce Babbitt of Arizona can beat both of these 1984 retreads yet finish with them in the bottom half of the six Democrats who have been campaigning in Iowa. If Babbitt does finish fourth, the journalists (myself included) who admire his gimmick of talking honestly about the deficit will have a tough time putting a positive spin on it. Even though the news media are renowned for putting winning images on such runners-up as Hart in Iowa in 1984 and George McGovern in New Hampshire in 1972, it's hard to picture a straight-faced reporter touting someone's "surprisingly strong" fourth-place finish.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | Compiled from reports by Daily News staff writer Reginald Stuart and Daily News wire services
Next Tuesday morning, after the Iowa caucuses are over, you won't hear a single candidate admitting defeat. No matter how well they did, each will say he did far better than expected. To pull this off, the campaigns have been doing what the professionals call "lowballing," building a set of not-so-great expectations. For example, even though Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas has consistently led Iowa polls, he's going around saying that the George Bush-Dan Rather confrontation turned the matchup between himself and the vice president into a dead heat.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | By REGINALD STUART, Daily News Staff Writer
The folks at the Crouse Cafe, where the roast beef and gravy platters rival Philadelphia's cheesesteaks, like to consider the place a barometer of the mood of this Farm Belt state. The popular dining spot is where farmers in overalls and bankers in business suits share their views on the issues of the day. It is also a stopover for many of the presidential candidates who have made working the small-town crowds part of their Iowa campaigns. "Everybody right now is talking about the caucuses," said Bobby Crouse, as he took a break from the grill at the family-owned restaurant.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Washington Bureau
"I've never seen a crowd this big here," Diane Shinn said of the approximately 1,000 students and faculty gathered to hear Sen. Paul Simon at the University of Iowa student union. "Of course, they're not clapping much," she added. "They're not excited, but they're here. " This is Simon's problem. The crowds are there. And they are paying attention. But it is not at all clear that Simon and his com fortable-as-an- old-shoe candidacy have the power to turn all the attention into a victory in the crucial precinct caucuses Monday.
NEWS
January 25, 1988 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Washington Bureau Susan Bennett of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
Usually in politics, a poll is just a poll. But there are times when a poll becomes an event. That description fits the Democratic presidential poll printed on the front page of the Des Moines Register yesterday, just 15 days before Iowa's first- in-the-nation caucuses. In fact, the poll is probably the biggest single event here between now and Caucus Night. "It sets the tone for the last two weeks," said Phil Roeder, spokesman for the Iowa Democratic Party. "It tells us who to watch and who not to watch.
NEWS
December 28, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Senate Republican leader Robert Dole and Vice President George Bush are almost even in Iowa's Republican presidential caucuses, according to a poll by the Des Moines Register. The poll found Dole the first choice of 37 percent of Iowans who say they are likely to attend the caucuses, while Bush was the first choice of 33 percent. Because the poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 5.5 percent, "It is unclear which of the top GOP candidates is ahead," the newspaper said.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | By Angelia Herrin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
It's funny, says Sen. Robert Dole, how he's changed his thinking about the importance of the Iowa caucuses in nominating the next president. "In 1980, I didn't think it was a very good process," he told a crowd at the Iowa Farm Bureau pancake breakfast. "Now, I kinda like it. " Dole, whose presidential bid finished last in Iowa in 1980, has good reason for his new attitude. For though polls continue to show him trailing Vice President Bush nationally, surveys in recent weeks have found him in the lead in Iowa.
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