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Ipod

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NEWS
September 18, 2008 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
WHAT'S on your iPod? It's a great way to get a quick snapshot of somebody's cultural temperature and political leanings. Bach or Beck? Franz Schubert or Franz Ferdinand? Moby or Toby Keith? Tell me, and I can size you up . . . in an iPod-nanosecond. Show me a guy whose playlist is weighted with Rascal Flatts and Vince Gill, and I think can predict his choice for president. And I'd wager that the guy who has downloaded the entire Jay-Z catalog is not likely to be ga-ga for Sarah.
NEWS
January 25, 2005 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So this is random. I'm walking the dog for her morning constitutional, with the new Apple iPod Shuffle hanging from my neck like a sleek, white IV line. The Shuffle has had its pick from the 3,932 songs stored on my computer, and what does it come up with first? Radiohead's "Bones. " Good iPod. It's the same route the dog's plowed for most of her 10 years, but we feel different today. "Life is random," the ads say. Must be. Dizzie Rascal's up next, Brits coming in pairs.
NEWS
June 4, 2006 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Highlights of my recent trip through the streets of historic Philadelphia with the new "Constitutional MP3 Audio Walking Tour" downloaded onto my iPod: Highlight No. 1. Damian "Junior Gong" Marley singing about injustice in Zimbabwe and his own revolutionary stirrings as I turned away from Independence Hall and walked toward Old City Hall at Fifth and Chestnut. Very educational and emotional - "In my lifetime I look back in paths I walked, where savages fought and passengers taught," Marley sings.
NEWS
February 8, 2006 | Barry Gottlieb
Barry Gottlieb is a humor writer based in San Francisco The Declaration of Independence says that all men are created equal. Unfortunately, the founding fathers didn't cite any scientific studies to prove this, most likely because there was no government yet, hence no cushy grant money available to sponsor the research. But the simple truth is that people aren't created equal. If they were, would a 20-year-old Caltech student be able to unscramble a Rubik's Cube in 11.13 seconds, while other people are lining up to take a course on how to use their iPods?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 12-year-old girl and I hope you will print this because it's about something important. I have an iPod Touch. My friends and I wanted to text, so I asked my mom if I could download a program to talk to my friends. She said it was OK. I really like "The Hunger Games," so I went into a "Hunger Games" chat room and started talking with some boys. The next thing I knew there were three men texting me, asking me questions about sex and asking for pictures. (It started with them asking if I was fat, and when I said no, I was asked to send a picture of me in a bathing suit to prove it.)
FOOD
October 6, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
The breakfast bustle is in full swing at Conshohocken Cafe and the waitresses bounce from table to table - chatting, refilling coffee, clearing plates. When they step into the kitchen, it's only to fetch orders, not put them in. In fact, you won't even find pads and pens at the cafe. Staffers key in orders on iPods and iPads linked to the kitchen through the cafe's WiFi network. SEE VIDEO Meanwhile, from anywhere in the world, the owners use their iPads to monitor the operation - seeing which tables are turning over when, and noting that, say, cheese omelets are the day's best seller.
NEWS
December 28, 2005 | By Alicia Greenleigh
The other day, I had a near catastrophic experience: My iPod wouldn't charge. Terror spread across my face. It was that look a 5-year-old gives you right before he urinates in his pants. My whole life flashed before my eyes, and I've owned my iPod for only two months. How could I work out if Gloria Estefan wasn't shouting "1, 2, 3, 4 . . . come on, baby, say you love me"? I know many of you can sympathize with this nightmare, and therein lies the problem. We live in society that demands to be entertained every moment of every day of our lives . . . where white earphones magically growing from one's pocket are just part of an ensemble . . . where music has become a moment-to-moment necessity.
NEWS
March 15, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's a beautiful morning on Kelly Drive. Late-winter sunlight shimmers on the Schuylkill. But I'd really rather be anywhere else. That's because I'm in the midst of the most miserable moments known to man: those first few minutes of a run, before the heart rate is really going, or adrenaline has kicked in. What is the point of this wretched pursuit? Why am I doing this, exactly? Luckily, or perhaps not, the Crystal Method is giving me a pep talk. Like nearly every other jogger along the river, I've got my iPod in hand and earbuds in place.
NEWS
December 11, 2003
YOUR Holiday Shopping Guide was a welcome sight in the Dec. 3 Daily News. But once again, it gave short shrift to Center City, whining about parking while barely mentioning that you can get downtown by trolley, El, rail, bus, foot, bike and ferryboat. Your reporter seeking Apple's new music player stated flatly that department stores "don't sell the iPod. " Just a few pages later, good old Strawbridge's display ad was featuring just that - the new 20 gigabyte iPod, no less.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
MARCELLUS JONES was pulled out of Graterford State Prison yesterday for a brief trip to Philadelphia. He was led handcuffed into Police Headquarters where, officials said, he was charged with the murder of Beau Zabel, a 23-year-old aspiring teacher who was gunned down on June 15, 2008, near the Italian Market. Zabel, who moved to the city from Minnesota, was walking home to his apartment after finishing a shift at a local Starbucks when he was shot and robbed of his iPod. His senseless slaying went unsolved until earlier this year, when police received tips that led them to zero in on Jones in the wake of an Inquirer series on the Zabel case.
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NEWS
December 6, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
MARCELLUS JONES was pulled out of Graterford State Prison yesterday for a brief trip to Philadelphia. He was led handcuffed into Police Headquarters where, officials said, he was charged with the murder of Beau Zabel, a 23-year-old aspiring teacher who was gunned down on June 15, 2008, near the Italian Market. Zabel, who moved to the city from Minnesota, was walking home to his apartment after finishing a shift at a local Starbucks when he was shot and robbed of his iPod. His senseless slaying went unsolved until earlier this year, when police received tips that led them to zero in on Jones in the wake of an Inquirer series on the Zabel case.
NEWS
November 16, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a murder that jolted the city – an aspiring young teacher from a small town in Minnesota killed for his iPod just steps from his apartment in the Italian Market. Beau Zabel, 23, had been in the Philadelphia only 42 days when he was shot dead while walking home from his summer job at Starbucks in June 2008. Now, five years later, Philadelphia police and prosecutors say they finally have enough evidence to charge his alleged killer. "An arrest is imminent," Capt.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
An off-duty Philadelphia police officer was stabbed twice in the abdomen Monday night after struggling with two men who robbed him of his iPod, police said. The officer was listed in stable condition Tuesday morning at Aria Health-Torresdale Campus hospital, according to Officer Christine O'Brien, a police spokeswoman. She didn't release the officer's identity. O'Brien gave the following account: The incident occurred about 9:30 p.m. when the officer was walking on the 4800 block of Grant Avenue near State Road in the Northeast.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2013 | By Anne D'Innocenzio, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Kaching! The cash register may be nearing its final sale. Stores across the country are ditching the old-fashioned, clunky machines and having salespeople - and even shoppers themselves - ring up sales on smartphones and tablet computers. Barneys New York, a luxury retailer, this year plans to use iPads or iPod Touch devices for credit- and debit-card purchases in seven of its nearly two dozen regular-price stores. Urban Outfitters, a teen clothing chain based in Philadelphia, ordered its last traditional register last fall and plans to go completely mobile one day. And Walmart, the world's largest retailer, is testing a "Scan & Go" app that lets customers scan their items as they shop.
SPORTS
January 20, 2013
Q: I find it to be a pain in the butt when I am on the highway and the person in the left lane is driving 40-50 mph. It is called the passing lane, buddy. At what point can I hit the horn or flash my lights? - In a Hurry but not a Rush from Ridley A: Slow down,'bro. It's not worth getting worked up with road rage over some slow driver, because these days you've got a lot of crazy people out there, and there's no telling what they'd do if confronted. Keeping a safe distance and flashing the brights once is cool, but if you keep doing it and the driver still doesn't move to the right, then it could turn into a game of wills.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 12-year-old girl and I hope you will print this because it's about something important. I have an iPod Touch. My friends and I wanted to text, so I asked my mom if I could download a program to talk to my friends. She said it was OK. I really like "The Hunger Games," so I went into a "Hunger Games" chat room and started talking with some boys. The next thing I knew there were three men texting me, asking me questions about sex and asking for pictures. (It started with them asking if I was fat, and when I said no, I was asked to send a picture of me in a bathing suit to prove it.)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2012
THE GIZMO: Apptivities and App-cessories seize the day at the 109th Annual American International Toy Fair. Kids (and toy makers) have often turned household items into favorite playthings. Say, connecting tin cans and string to make a primitive phone. Or poking plastic body parts into a vegetable or piece of fruit - how the enduring Mr. Potato Head was born 60 years ago. Today, the apple of kids' eyes is often mom and dad's smartphones and tablets. The young 'uns are all over 'em, even when the devices aren't hosting a storybook or "Yo Gabba Gabba" video.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Bruce Newman, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS
CUPERTINO, Calif. - Steve Jobs, who sparked a revolution in the technology industry then presided over it as Silicon Valley's radiant Sun King, died Wednesday. He was 56 when he died, ahead of his time to the very end. The incandescent center of a tech universe around which all the other planets revolved, Mr. Jobs had a genius for stylish design and a boyish sense of what was "cool. " According to a spokesman for Apple Inc. - the company Mr. Jobs cofounded when he was just 21 and turned into one of the world's great industrial-design houses - he suffered from a recurrence of the pancreatic cancer for which he had undergone surgery in 2004.
FOOD
October 6, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
The breakfast bustle is in full swing at Conshohocken Cafe and the waitresses bounce from table to table - chatting, refilling coffee, clearing plates. When they step into the kitchen, it's only to fetch orders, not put them in. In fact, you won't even find pads and pens at the cafe. Staffers key in orders on iPods and iPads linked to the kitchen through the cafe's WiFi network. SEE VIDEO Meanwhile, from anywhere in the world, the owners use their iPads to monitor the operation - seeing which tables are turning over when, and noting that, say, cheese omelets are the day's best seller.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Bruce Newman, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS
CUPERTINO, Calif. - Steve Jobs, who sparked a revolution in the technology industry then presided over it as Silicon Valley's radiant Sun King, died Wednesday. The incandescent center of a tech universe around which all the other planets revolved, Jobs had a genius for stylish design and a boyish sense of what was "cool. " He was 56 when he died, ahead of his time to the very end. According to a spokesman for Apple Inc. - the company Jobs co-founded when he was just 21 and turned into one of the world's great industrial-design houses - he suffered from a recurrence of the pancreatic cancer for which he had undergone surgery in 2004.
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