FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 7, 2007
THIS WEEK'S release of the National Intelligence Estimate (NIE) on Iran answered many questions, but the White House's reaction raised far more dangerous ones, for which we deserve answers. Despite White House blustering about the growing threat of a "nuclear Iran," the NIE found, with "high confidence," that Iran shut down its nuclear weapons program in 2003, and also found that it had not been restarted. There is almost no one who believes a nuclear Iran wouldn't be a severe threat, so the findings were a relief.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Nasser Karimi and Brian Murphy, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran is signaling a possible compromise offer heading into critical talks with world powers deeply suspicious of its nuclear program: offering to scale back uranium enrichment but not abandon the ability to make nuclear fuel. The proposal - floated by the country's nuclear chief as part of the early parrying in various capitals before negotiations get under way Friday - suggested that sanctions-battered Iran was ready to bargain. But this gambit, at least, appeared to fall short of Western demands that Iran hand over its most potent nuclear material.
NEWS
September 19, 1986
I was shocked to find an article on the continued supplying of war goods to Iran by Israel buried on Page 35-A on Sept. 14. How is it that a client state of the United States like Israel, which receives extensive U.S. military, can support an avowed enemy of the United States? Having lived the last 12 years in the Middle East, I was often embarrassed by the Arab assertion that the media in the U.S. is "Zionist-controlled. " When I see evidence cited above, I wonder. Jack D. McLeod Wallingford.
NEWS
November 15, 2011
By Doyle McManus The U.N. report on Iran's nuclear program released last week should end the debate, if any remained, over whether Iran is moving toward acquiring the ability to build a nuclear weapon. In cautious but convincing detail, the International Atomic Energy Agency listed evidence that Iran is still conducting research that would lead to an atomic bomb, much of it in secret military laboratories. And Iran has refused to answer the United Nations' questions or allow its inspectors to see much of what it's doing, the easiest way to refute its critics' charges.
NEWS
December 30, 2011 | By Julie Pace, Associated Press
HONOLULU - The sale of $30 billion worth of F-15SA fighter jets to Saudi Arabia has been completed, boosting the military strength of a key U.S. ally in the Middle East to help counter Iran, the Obama administration announced Thursday. Under the agreement, the United States will send Saudi Arabia 84 new fighter jets and upgrades for 70 more. Production of the aircraft, which will be manufactured by Boeing Co., will support 50,000 jobs and have a $3.5 billion annual economic impact in the United States, the White House said.
NEWS
April 16, 2011 | Matthew Lee, Associated Press
BERLIN - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on Friday accused Iran of trying to hijack democratic revolutions around the Mideast and warned Arab nations not to permit intolerance against women and religious minorities. Clinton said Iran was clearly trying to use uprisings around the region to further its own goals and foment broader unrest while at the same time cracking down on its own reform movement. "I think that everyone is aware of its efforts to exploit and even hijack what are legitimate protests.
NEWS
February 5, 2003 | By Trudy Rubin
A few days in Tehran are enough to dispel the biggest myth about Iran in the Bush administration. Bush hawks believe Iran is the next stop on the "axis of evil," but that America doesn't have to invade the country. Iran, they say, is ripe for implosion. Its younger generation, which propelled a landslide win by Islamic reformers in national elections, will soon force hard-line ayatollahs out and usher in a secular democracy. The Iraq war will be the trigger that sends this youth wave into the streets.
NEWS
January 12, 2006
THE NATION of Iran, newly led by a Holocaust denier, virulent anti-Semite and saber-rattling warmonger, has let it be known that it plans to sail full speed ahead into becoming a nuclear power, an action that would threaten all of the Middle East, including our strong and vital ally, Israel. While the United Nations has issued statements of concern about Iran's intentions and tepid threats of consequences if it continues to pursue this path, Iran is betting that the United Nations is a paper tiger.
NEWS
September 21, 1988
One area where Amnesty International had no success was in persuading Iran to halt a wave of political executions that were reportedly carried out during the last month. The Khomeini regime, which has executed and jailed innumerable political opponents since it took power, does not allow access to its prisons. But the halt in family visits to political prisoners in Tehran's notorious Evin prison, a vengeful public call by Iran's leading jurist for executions without trial and Iranian media reports of hangings have fueled speculation that many political prisoners have been killed.
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NEWS
August 10, 2016
By Tom Ridge Last week, Iran's Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei accused the United States of failing to honor pledges in the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). Citing "the futility of negotiations with the Americans," he distanced himself from the nuclear deal he once supported. Coming just weeks after the one-year anniversary of the agreement, his charge is just another in an escalating war of words from Tehran that remind the world that the "era of good feelings" promised by U.S. negotiators never came to pass.
TRAVEL
July 25, 2016 | By Lou Oschmann, For The Inquirer
For many years, I read about the rich history of Persia and yearned to see the wonders left behind in Iran, but when I told my friends I wanted to visit Iran, they thought I was crazy. They didn't believe it was safe, or they thought Iranians would be hostile toward Americans. Nothing could be further from the truth: The people's friendly welcome was rivaled only by the beautiful remains of Persian culture. I started my 11-day tour of Iran in April in the ancient Persian city of Persepolis, where 3,000-year-old palaces and gateways built by Xerxes and Darius the Great still stand.
TRAVEL
May 22, 2016
Answer: Pakistan. It borders Afghanistan, China, India, and Iran.
NEWS
April 5, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - On policy, the three Pennsylvania Democrats running for U.S. Senate have shown few differences. With only subtle distinctions, Joe Sestak, Katie McGinty, and John Fetterman all broadly support key party planks: higher wages for the working class, the Affordable Care Act, tougher gun laws, abortion rights, same-sex marriage, the Iran nuclear deal, and the idea that the government should combat climate change. Their only major policy disagreement is on trade deals. But as their race enters its final stretch before the April 26 primary, they have staked out competing personal stories and points of emphasis to pitch to voters.
NEWS
March 1, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
State of the world, Year Eight of Barack Obama: China.  In the South China Sea, on a speck of land of disputed sovereignty far from its borders, China has just installed antiaircraft batteries and stationed fighter jets. This after China landed planes on an artificial island it created on another disputed island chain (the Spratlys, claimed by the Philippines, Malaysia, Taiwan, and Vietnam). These facilities now function as forward bases for Beijing to challenge seven decades of American naval dominance of the Pacific Rim. "China is clearly militarizing the South China Sea," the commander of the U.S. Pacific Command told Congress on Tuesday.
NEWS
January 25, 2016
Edward Colimore is a former Inquirer staff writer The Gulf War had just broken out. Jeff Zaun, a Navy navigator and bombardier, was nestled in the cockpit of an A-6E Intruder, poised to drop cluster bombs on an Iraqi air base when a missile struck. The Cherry Hill native ejected along with pilot Bob Wetzel, who broke both arms exiting, and the two were captured and later whisked away to Baghdad for interrogation. In the days that followed, Zaun became the face of the first Gulf War, the image of the battered, bloodied American POW appearing on front pages, magazine covers, and televisions around the world.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Now that the Iran nuclear deal is a done deal, what next? More quickly than expected, Tehran has dismantled large portions of its nuclear program, leading to the lifting of the sanctions imposed on its nuclear activities. Contrary to the critics, this deal does make the Mideast safer - for now. But it also raises the controversial question of whether the deal will trigger a broader shift in U.S.-Iranian relations. The quick release of 10 U.S. sailors who strayed into Iranian waters and a prisoner swap last week have been hailed by administration officials as the beginning of a new era in U.S.-Iranian relations.
NEWS
January 19, 2016
Prisoner swap draws a range of reactions from local lawmakers and candidates. A4. Iran gains economic relief, but moderate leader still faces challenges. A4.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - News over the weekend that Iran had dismantled key components of its nuclear program and released five American prisoners emboldened some local supporters of President Obama's diplomatic efforts, though others urged caution and critics continued to question the international nuclear accord that led to those steps. The reactions came as the developments offered new context for a deal that has anguished many local officials, brought fierce resistance from some and stirred clashes in the early stages of Pennsylvania's U.S. Senate race.
NEWS
January 6, 2016
By Pat Toomey and Tom Ridge On Dec. 16, Secretary of State John Kerry certified to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that Iran is in full compliance with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and that the "suspension of sanctions related to Iran pursuant to the agreement is appropriate . . . and is vital to the national security interests of the United States. " If this delusion results in the imminent lifting of sanctions, Iran will gain immediate access to more than $100 billion; the sanctions regime will be effectively over; and the only incentive for Iran even to pretend to comply with the agreement will be gone.
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