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Iranian Regime

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NEWS
September 8, 2011
By Tom Ridge and Lord Carlile of Berriew While Secretary of State Hillary Clinton edges closer to deciding to remove the Iranian opposition group, the Mujahedeen e Khalq (MEK), from a U.S. list of banned organizations, the international media has been awash with Iranian regime propaganda attempting to demonize the group. In an attempt to counteract this tendentious public relations campaign, the group's supporters, including senior figures in U.S., British, and European political circles, have waged their own media campaign to counter the Iranian propaganda.
NEWS
November 22, 2011 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Thwarted internationally, the Obama administration cobbled together a new set of best-available sanctions against Iran on Monday that underlined its limited capacity to force Tehran to halt its suspected nuclear-weapons program. The action was coordinated with Britain and Canada, but not with countries such as Russia and China that have far greater economic investments in the Islamic republic. The U.S. sanctions target Iran's oil and petrochemicals industry and Iranian companies involved in nuclear procurement or enrichment activity.
NEWS
July 10, 1988
Before Iran Air Flight 655 was shot down, a debate was heating up over whether the United States should make new overtures to Tehran. This debate has actually intensified after the air tragedy, which has underlined the need to find a formula to end the Iran-Iraq war. Secretary of State George P. Shultz confirmed that before the accident, Iranian officials had sent messages through intermediaries that they were interested in a dialogue. Since these messages presumably reflect basic changes in Iran's geopolitical situation, it is likely that they will continue, despite the current ill feelings over the air tragedy.
NEWS
October 3, 1997
It's a question that has long bedeviled the West: How to deal with an Iranian regime that has sponsored terrorism and is trying to build nuclear weapons. But this much is clear: America should not get into a war of economic sanctions with France and Russia over differences in Iran policies. Yet that may be where the United States is heading, following a $2 billion investment by the French company Total in the development of Iranian gas, undertaken with Russian and Malaysian partners.
NEWS
October 12, 2009 | By Bob Casey and Sam Brownback
President Obama recently announced that Iran has been secretly constructing a nuclear facility south of Tehran. Sadly, this revelation was not surprising, given that the Iranian regime has spent years lying about its nuclear program, sponsoring terrorism, and oppressing its own citizens. Whatever one thinks about the prospects of diplomacy, it's time for tougher measures to constrain the regime's ability to acquire weapons of mass destruction before it's too late. One promising approach is targeted divestment from Iran's energy sector.
NEWS
May 10, 1988
A year or so ago, the Reagan administration was worried that Iran was on the verge of defeating Iraq in their endless war and thus becoming the dominant power in the Persian Gulf. Back then, experts were arguing over whether the United States should rescue Iraq or try to woo the future victors in Iran. Today, the situation is dramatically different. Iran's economy is ailing, and its military is on the defensive. The Revolutionary Guards, religious warriors who once seemed eager to walk through mine fields to more speedily reach heaven, are losing their zeal.
NEWS
December 13, 2011 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration said Monday that it had delivered a formal request to Iran for the return of a U.S. surveillance drone captured by Iranian armed forces, but is not hopeful that Iran will comply. President Obama said that the United States wants the top-secret aircraft back. "We have asked for it back. We'll see how the Iranians respond," Obama said during a White House news conference with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki on Monday. He would not comment on what the Iranians might learn from studying the downed aircraft.
NEWS
January 16, 2013
No big deal As I read about the failure of the baseball writers to elect anyone to the Hall of Fame this year, it occurs to me that the only people who really care about the use of performance-enhancing drugs are the media ("Bonds, Clemens should be in the Hall of Fame," Saturday). I have never spoken to a fan who thinks that this is a big deal. Athletes have been using some form of these drugs for as long as I can remember. Who cares? It's only a game to me, an entertainment form. Baseball writers should get off their moral high horse and do what they should be doing, recognizing extraordinary performance in the sport of baseball.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | Choose one .
It's become a cliché of presidential debates: Facing any question about Afghanistan or other national security issues, the candidates declare that they would heed the advice of their "commanders in the field. " It is striking, then, how willing they are to dismiss outright the opinions of America's national security professionals when it comes to Iran. At a recent conference of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the Republican candidates played a game of rhetorical one-upmanship in expressing their willingness to take America to war in Iran.
NEWS
September 15, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
U.N. Secretary-General Javier Perez de Cuellar wound up his peace mission in the Persian Gulf yesterday and heard Iraq call for U.N. sanctions against Iran for failing to respond to a Security Council demand for a cease-fire. Western diplomats in the region told Reuters that they had thought Perez de Cuellar would come home empty-handed since Iran had refused to back down on its major demand - that the United Nations name Iraq as the aggressor and punish it. In the waters of the gulf yesterday, a convoy of reflagged Kuwaiti tankers and their U.S. Navy escorts finished the 550-mile voyage from Kuwait to the southern end of the gulf in record time and without incident.
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NEWS
January 16, 2013
No big deal As I read about the failure of the baseball writers to elect anyone to the Hall of Fame this year, it occurs to me that the only people who really care about the use of performance-enhancing drugs are the media ("Bonds, Clemens should be in the Hall of Fame," Saturday). I have never spoken to a fan who thinks that this is a big deal. Athletes have been using some form of these drugs for as long as I can remember. Who cares? It's only a game to me, an entertainment form. Baseball writers should get off their moral high horse and do what they should be doing, recognizing extraordinary performance in the sport of baseball.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
There are few foreign-policy positions more silly than the assertion, without context, that "deterrence works. " It is like saying air power works. It worked for Kosovo; it didn't work over North Vietnam. It's like saying city-bombing works. It worked in Japan. It didn't in London. The idea that some military technique "works" is meaningless. It depends on the time, circumstances, and adversaries. Yet a school of American "realists" remains absolutist on deterrence and is increasingly annoyed with those troublesome Israelis who are risking regional war by threatening a preemptive strike to stop Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | Choose one .
It's become a cliché of presidential debates: Facing any question about Afghanistan or other national security issues, the candidates declare that they would heed the advice of their "commanders in the field. " It is striking, then, how willing they are to dismiss outright the opinions of America's national security professionals when it comes to Iran. At a recent conference of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the Republican candidates played a game of rhetorical one-upmanship in expressing their willingness to take America to war in Iran.
NEWS
December 13, 2011 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration said Monday that it had delivered a formal request to Iran for the return of a U.S. surveillance drone captured by Iranian armed forces, but is not hopeful that Iran will comply. President Obama said that the United States wants the top-secret aircraft back. "We have asked for it back. We'll see how the Iranians respond," Obama said during a White House news conference with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki on Monday. He would not comment on what the Iranians might learn from studying the downed aircraft.
NEWS
November 22, 2011 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Thwarted internationally, the Obama administration cobbled together a new set of best-available sanctions against Iran on Monday that underlined its limited capacity to force Tehran to halt its suspected nuclear-weapons program. The action was coordinated with Britain and Canada, but not with countries such as Russia and China that have far greater economic investments in the Islamic republic. The U.S. sanctions target Iran's oil and petrochemicals industry and Iranian companies involved in nuclear procurement or enrichment activity.
NEWS
September 8, 2011
By Tom Ridge and Lord Carlile of Berriew While Secretary of State Hillary Clinton edges closer to deciding to remove the Iranian opposition group, the Mujahedeen e Khalq (MEK), from a U.S. list of banned organizations, the international media has been awash with Iranian regime propaganda attempting to demonize the group. In an attempt to counteract this tendentious public relations campaign, the group's supporters, including senior figures in U.S., British, and European political circles, have waged their own media campaign to counter the Iranian propaganda.
NEWS
October 12, 2009 | By Bob Casey and Sam Brownback
President Obama recently announced that Iran has been secretly constructing a nuclear facility south of Tehran. Sadly, this revelation was not surprising, given that the Iranian regime has spent years lying about its nuclear program, sponsoring terrorism, and oppressing its own citizens. Whatever one thinks about the prospects of diplomacy, it's time for tougher measures to constrain the regime's ability to acquire weapons of mass destruction before it's too late. One promising approach is targeted divestment from Iran's energy sector.
NEWS
March 31, 2005 | By Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iraq has an oasis where fountains gurgle over pebbles and flowers blossom in lush gardens. The hospital is spotless and fully stocked; schools offer violin lessons. Electricity is always on and the water is always clean in this serene, self-sufficient compound. One thing is missing: An exit. This never-never land is Camp Ashraf, home to nearly 4,000 Iranian militants on windswept plains in the heart of Iraq's most perilous region. At once sympathetic and strange, the People's Mujaheddin of Iran, or Mujaheddin Khalq, have spent the last two decades on a single-minded mission to overthrow the fundamentalist clerics of Iran.
NEWS
October 3, 1997
It's a question that has long bedeviled the West: How to deal with an Iranian regime that has sponsored terrorism and is trying to build nuclear weapons. But this much is clear: America should not get into a war of economic sanctions with France and Russia over differences in Iran policies. Yet that may be where the United States is heading, following a $2 billion investment by the French company Total in the development of Iranian gas, undertaken with Russian and Malaysian partners.
NEWS
July 10, 1988
Before Iran Air Flight 655 was shot down, a debate was heating up over whether the United States should make new overtures to Tehran. This debate has actually intensified after the air tragedy, which has underlined the need to find a formula to end the Iran-Iraq war. Secretary of State George P. Shultz confirmed that before the accident, Iranian officials had sent messages through intermediaries that they were interested in a dialogue. Since these messages presumably reflect basic changes in Iran's geopolitical situation, it is likely that they will continue, despite the current ill feelings over the air tragedy.
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