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NEWS
July 4, 2006 | By Medea Benjamin
As we celebrate the 230th anniversary of our nation's founding, we find ourselves in a tragic position: A nation born out of a longing for freedom from domination has now become the dominator. The founders warned that the invasion and occupation of other lands would turn America into precisely the sort of occupying force they had rebelled against. "If there be one principle more deeply written than any other in the mind of every American," said Thomas Jefferson in 1791, "it is that we should have nothing to do with conquest.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On Christmas Day in 2008, I attended early-morning Mass at the Al Qaleb Al Aqdas (Sacred Heart) Church, in the Karrada district of Baghdad. Although Christians had already become targets in Iraq's civil war and thousands had fled, the Chaldean Catholic church was filled with well-dressed families, and a choir sang near a large Christmas tree. Some worshipers continued on to a Santa Claus show in a nearby park. Those days are long gone. The number of Chaldeans (whose church dates to the early Christian era)
NEWS
January 19, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
President-elect Clinton is being urged to bomb Iraqi troops - and thereby increase Saddam Hussein's risk of overthrow from within - if he continues to violate U.N. sanctions, the Los Angeles Times said today. And a second U.S. aircraft carrier was moving to within striking range of Iraq today to bolster the Bush administration's warning that a fourth round of allied attacks could take place unless Saddam abides by U.N. demands. Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is among those recommending that Clinton warn Saddam of expanded strikes against military targets unless he complies with the sanctions, the newspaper said.
NEWS
May 19, 2003 | By Charles Krauthammer
There is a large and overlooked truth about the American occupation of Iraq: Whereas in postwar Germany and Japan we were rebuilding countries that had been largely destroyed by us, in Iraq today we are rebuilding a country destroyed by its own regime. In Iraq, it was Saddam Hussein who turned the place to rubble. By any standard, the amount of destruction caused by the coalition was small - and most was inflicted upon the organs of the Baathist regime. The infrastructure - roads, bridges, sewage systems, schools, mosques and hospitals - was barely touched.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
The United States has rejected any settlement in the Persian Gulf that leaves Iraq holding gains from its Aug. 2 invasion of Kuwait. "It's a case from our standpoint of not wanting to succumb to the siren song of a partial solution to this crisis," Secretary of State James Baker told a news conference yesterday. Baker said it was the U.S. position that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein "should not in any way be rewarded for his aggression. " President Bush also showed no interest in reports that Saddam might be seeking a deal under which he would withdraw his forces, but hang on to two strategic islands in the Gulf plus an oil field that straddled the pre- invasion border.
NEWS
September 4, 1998 | By Derrick DePledge, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Scott Ritter, the American who resigned in protest last week from a U.N. weapons-inspection team, told the Senate yesterday that officials at the "highest level" of the Clinton administration were undermining efforts to disarm Iraq. The former chief of the concealment investigation unit for the U.N. Special Commission on Iraq said the United States and other members of the U.N. Security Council interfered with two planned inspections this summer to avoid an international confrontation with Iraq's Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
November 20, 2012
By Daniel L. Davis Since David Petraeus resigned as CIA director because of a sex scandal, many journalists and pundits have argued that his service to the nation should not be dismissed because of one "mistake. " An evaluation of the former general's record, however, shows that he made far more than one mistake, and that the consequences for the nation and thousands of individuals have been profound. It's time for the shroud of popular myth to be removed from Petraeus' war record. Recent reports quoted U.S. Sen. John McCain as calling Petraeus one of "America's greatest military heroes," adding, "His inspirational leadership and his genius were directly responsible - after years of failure - for the success of the surge in Iraq.
NEWS
October 24, 2004 | By Trudy Rubin
This election will be won by the candidate who voters think will keep them safer. President Bush is promoting his image as the steadfast sheriff who will shoot when he must. Vice President Cheney is pushing the line that Sen. John F. Kerry would let terrorists attack our cities. "John Kerry would lead you to believe he has the same kind of view that George Bush has, that he would be tough and aggressive," says Cheney. "I don't believe it. " Cheney misses the point. A President who's tough and aggressive doesn't necessarily make the country safer.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | By John Donnelly, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The U.N. weapons-inspection team heads back to Iraq today with what inspectors say is a virtually impossible mission: quickly finding evidence of Saddam Hussein's weapons. The inspectors feel time pressure because of strong international support to end nearly eight years of economic sanctions that have crippled Iraq. Even the head of the U.N. Special Commission, which conducts the inspections, spoke Sunday about wrapping up parts of his work in just a few months. Making the inspectors' work even more daunting is the fact that no one has investigated Iraq's weapons programs since the United States ended surprise inspections in August.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | By Jim Wolf, Reuters The Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney yesterday raised the possibility of renewed U.S. military action against Iraq because President Saddam Hussein was failing to live up to the terms of the gulf war cease-fire. In interviews with four television networks marking the first anniversary of the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, Cheney said Hussein was still trying to conceal atomic bomb-building equipment in defiance of the United Nations. "If we have to, we have the capacity to go back in with air strikes and do additional damage to targets in Iraq," he said on CBS. "We prefer not to do that, but he needs to understand that that's an option if he does not comply.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On Christmas Day in 2008, I attended early-morning Mass at the Al Qaleb Al Aqdas (Sacred Heart) Church, in the Karrada district of Baghdad. Although Christians had already become targets in Iraq's civil war and thousands had fled, the Chaldean Catholic church was filled with well-dressed families, and a choir sang near a large Christmas tree. Some worshipers continued on to a Santa Claus show in a nearby park. Those days are long gone. The number of Chaldeans (whose church dates to the early Christian era)
NEWS
November 20, 2012
By Daniel L. Davis Since David Petraeus resigned as CIA director because of a sex scandal, many journalists and pundits have argued that his service to the nation should not be dismissed because of one "mistake. " An evaluation of the former general's record, however, shows that he made far more than one mistake, and that the consequences for the nation and thousands of individuals have been profound. It's time for the shroud of popular myth to be removed from Petraeus' war record. Recent reports quoted U.S. Sen. John McCain as calling Petraeus one of "America's greatest military heroes," adding, "His inspirational leadership and his genius were directly responsible - after years of failure - for the success of the surge in Iraq.
NEWS
July 4, 2006 | By Medea Benjamin
As we celebrate the 230th anniversary of our nation's founding, we find ourselves in a tragic position: A nation born out of a longing for freedom from domination has now become the dominator. The founders warned that the invasion and occupation of other lands would turn America into precisely the sort of occupying force they had rebelled against. "If there be one principle more deeply written than any other in the mind of every American," said Thomas Jefferson in 1791, "it is that we should have nothing to do with conquest.
NEWS
December 15, 2005 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush wrapped up a series of speeches about Iraq yesterday by defending the 2003 invasion despite erroneous prewar intelligence about weapons of mass destruction. "It's true that much of the intelligence turned out to be wrong," Bush said - omitting that he and top aides had ignored warnings from midlevel intelligence agents that some of the evidence was suspect - then added that he had no regrets about his decision to oust Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. "We are in Iraq today because our goal has always been more than the removal of a brutal dictator.
NEWS
October 24, 2004 | By Trudy Rubin
This election will be won by the candidate who voters think will keep them safer. President Bush is promoting his image as the steadfast sheriff who will shoot when he must. Vice President Cheney is pushing the line that Sen. John F. Kerry would let terrorists attack our cities. "John Kerry would lead you to believe he has the same kind of view that George Bush has, that he would be tough and aggressive," says Cheney. "I don't believe it. " Cheney misses the point. A President who's tough and aggressive doesn't necessarily make the country safer.
NEWS
March 20, 2004 | By Jonathan S. Landay, Warren P. Strobel and John Walcott INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The U.S.-led war against Iraq began one year ago with an urgent message from a clandestine team of U.S. intelligence officers who had infiltrated Baghdad: An Iraqi agent who said he had "eyes on" Saddam Hussein was reporting that Hussein would be spending the night at a compound in southern Baghdad. The encrypted message arrived at CIA headquarters Wednesday afternoon, March 19. At 7:12 p.m., President Bush ordered an air strike on the compound. The attack two hours later, 37 minutes before dawn March 20 in Baghdad, reportedly killed one civilian, injured 14, and obliterated the target, but Hussein and his two sons, Odai and Qusai, survived.
NEWS
May 19, 2003 | By Charles Krauthammer
There is a large and overlooked truth about the American occupation of Iraq: Whereas in postwar Germany and Japan we were rebuilding countries that had been largely destroyed by us, in Iraq today we are rebuilding a country destroyed by its own regime. In Iraq, it was Saddam Hussein who turned the place to rubble. By any standard, the amount of destruction caused by the coalition was small - and most was inflicted upon the organs of the Baathist regime. The infrastructure - roads, bridges, sewage systems, schools, mosques and hospitals - was barely touched.
NEWS
January 31, 2003 | By Andrea Gerlin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After joining seven other European leaders this week in signing a letter backing the U.S. stance toward Iraq, British Prime Minister Tony Blair will meet with President Bush today to coordinate strategy in the intensifying campaign to disarm the government of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. The two leaders will meet in Camp David., Md., to consult on diplomatic measures to avert a war with Iraq and, if those fail, the timing of possible military action. Blair is also likely to touch on Secretary of State Colin L. Powell's plan to present evidence to the U.N. Security Council next week about Iraq's alleged hiding of weapons of mass destruction and association with terrorists.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | By John Donnelly, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The U.N. weapons-inspection team heads back to Iraq today with what inspectors say is a virtually impossible mission: quickly finding evidence of Saddam Hussein's weapons. The inspectors feel time pressure because of strong international support to end nearly eight years of economic sanctions that have crippled Iraq. Even the head of the U.N. Special Commission, which conducts the inspections, spoke Sunday about wrapping up parts of his work in just a few months. Making the inspectors' work even more daunting is the fact that no one has investigated Iraq's weapons programs since the United States ended surprise inspections in August.
NEWS
September 4, 1998 | By Derrick DePledge, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Scott Ritter, the American who resigned in protest last week from a U.N. weapons-inspection team, told the Senate yesterday that officials at the "highest level" of the Clinton administration were undermining efforts to disarm Iraq. The former chief of the concealment investigation unit for the U.N. Special Commission on Iraq said the United States and other members of the U.N. Security Council interfered with two planned inspections this summer to avoid an international confrontation with Iraq's Saddam Hussein.
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