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Iraqi Army

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Tom Fiedler, Inquirer Gulf Staff
A month of relentless allied bombing may have killed or wounded 50,000 to 60,000 Iraqi soldiers, according to a pair of military analysts experienced in estimating battlefield casualties. There are no confirmed Iraqi casualty figures available, but formulas developed in the aftermath of past conflicts indicate that as many as 18,000 Iraqi troops may have died in the bombing, according to military historian Trevor Dupuy. Dupuy, a retired U.S. Army colonel, estimated the total Iraqi casualties at 60,000.
NEWS
April 29, 1991 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. military yesterday began airlifting Shiite Muslim refugees from southern Iraq to a camp in Saudi Arabia, where they are expected to stay until it is safe for them to return home. Five planes yesterday carried about 340 refugees from a U.S. Army-protected camp in Safwan to a camp erected by the Saudi government in Rafha. By tomorrow, the daily number of passengers is expected to increase to as many as 1,500, so that by early next month, up to 15,000 Iraqi Shiites will be moved to Rafha.
NEWS
October 20, 2003 | By Jeff Wilkinson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Two more U.S. soldiers have been killed and another wounded in violence in Iraq, the military said yesterday. The deaths occurred when a patrol from the Fourth Infantry Division was ambushed Saturday night southwest of Kirkuk, about 160 miles north of Baghdad. The attackers fired small arms and rocket-propelled grenades at the Americans. U.S. troops returned fire, but no further contact was made with the guerrilla fighters, the military said. The names of the dead were withheld pending notification of families.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | By Juan O. Tamayo, Inquirer Gulf Staff
An allied air strike last month hit a Kuwaiti hospital complex, killing five civilians, including three nurses and a 3-year-old girl, and wounding 36 others, witnesses said. Among the injured was an Egyptian doctor who lost an eye and part of his nose but performed major surgery seven days later. "My philosophy is that God left me one eye to see and left for me my hands to work," said Hamid Labib, 45, a Cairo native. He said he bore no grudge against the allied pilots who attacked the Al Adan hospital about 2 p.m. Feb. 9. "No, no, no," he said.
NEWS
January 2, 2006 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
By allowing Iraq's new military to be organized largely along ethnic and religious lines, the United States may be inadvertently deepening the divisions among the country's Kurdish north, Shiite Muslim south and Sunni Arab west - leaving the sects to fight over the heart of the country. The creation of a national army to help unify and pacify Iraq is key to U.S. plans to begin significant withdrawals of American troops from Iraq in 2006, and President Bush and other top officials frequently cite the growing number of trained Iraqi troops as evidence of progress.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
One of the most frustrating aspects of President Obama's "strategy" to degrade and destroy ISIS in Iraq is that he seems to grasp why it isn't working. Yet he refuses to take the obvious steps needed to fix it (and I don't mean sending thousands of American ground troops). Instead, he only tinkers with a strategy that has failed. U.S. officials rightly want the Iraqis to do the fighting against ISIS, helped by U.S. trainers and coalition air strikes. Last week, the president decided to send 450 more U.S. military trainers and support troops to a new base in Anbar province, an ISIS stronghold.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Ever since key Iraqi and Syrian cities fell to ISIS last month, the administration has been scrambling to adjust its tactics. Rather than revamp a failed strategy, U.S. officials now appear ready to rely (at least tacitly) on Iran to help roll back the jihadis. This is especially true in Iraq, where Iranian-backed Shiite militias have proven more effective in fighting ISIS than the Iraqi army has. Previously wary of these Shiite militias - lest they inflame sectarian tensions and push more Sunni Iraqis into the ISIS camp - U.S. officials have now dropped objections to their playing a major role.
NEWS
October 29, 2003 | By Trudy Rubin
The woman was screaming: "We don't have the strength to endure any more. " It was Monday in this city's wealthy al-Khudra district. The woman stood around the corner from where a car bomber had just missed the police station but incinerated 16 cars along with several shoppers. Elegantly dressed under a modest black cloak, she cried out, "I put the responsibility on the Americans, because they came here. Iraqis are going crazy. " Her words sum up the dilemma facing occupation authorities.
NEWS
November 9, 2003 | By Maureen Fan INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
In a move that could help improve security here, Kurdish peshmerga units are preparing to help bolster Iraq's fledgling police and army. "We are planning with the coalition forces to distribute peshmerga forces among the border guards, the police forces, and training them to merge with the new Iraqi army," said Jalal Talabani, leader of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, and one of nine rotating council presidents who took up leadership of the...
NEWS
September 6, 1988 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Turkish authorities launched a major effort yesterday to move tens of thousands of Kurdish refugees from encampments near the Iraqi border, apparently to protect them from Iraqi army units that have been combing the frontier for Kurdish rebels. As many as 100,000 Kurds have poured across the boulder-strewn peaks of northern Iraq and into Turkey over the last two weeks to escape a massive Iraqi military campaign against Kurdish separatists. Following reports over the weekend that Iraqi troops had fired over the border into one of the refugee encampments, Turkish authorities began transporting the refugees, in the backs of government-owned trucks, to relief centers farther from the border.
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NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
Why would anyone in the Middle East want to ally with the United States? There are many reasons to ask this question, but here's one I find especially disturbing: how the United States lets down thousands of Afghans and Iraqis whose lives are at risk because they have worked with Americans. For this "sin," they and their relatives are now being threatened with death. I have written of the long delays in issuing special visas for Iraqi and Afghan translators who worked with U.S. military and civilian officials.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
After the grim foreign-policy news from the Mideast in 2015, can we hope for anything better in the new year? That would be a relief, after a year in which ISIS thrived amid the Mideast chaos and civil wars that flooded Europe with one million refugees, half of them from Syria. So is there any reason to expect things to improve in 2016? After all, in December the world's major powers agreed on a framework plan for ending the Syrian civil war, right? And the Iraqi army (retrained, yet again, by U.S. officers)
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
One of the most frustrating aspects of President Obama's "strategy" to degrade and destroy ISIS in Iraq is that he seems to grasp why it isn't working. Yet he refuses to take the obvious steps needed to fix it (and I don't mean sending thousands of American ground troops). Instead, he only tinkers with a strategy that has failed. U.S. officials rightly want the Iraqis to do the fighting against ISIS, helped by U.S. trainers and coalition air strikes. Last week, the president decided to send 450 more U.S. military trainers and support troops to a new base in Anbar province, an ISIS stronghold.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Ever since key Iraqi and Syrian cities fell to ISIS last month, the administration has been scrambling to adjust its tactics. Rather than revamp a failed strategy, U.S. officials now appear ready to rely (at least tacitly) on Iran to help roll back the jihadis. This is especially true in Iraq, where Iranian-backed Shiite militias have proven more effective in fighting ISIS than the Iraqi army has. Previously wary of these Shiite militias - lest they inflame sectarian tensions and push more Sunni Iraqis into the ISIS camp - U.S. officials have now dropped objections to their playing a major role.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On May 23, 2003, I attended the Baghdad news conference at which the U.S. viceroy, Paul Bremer, announced he was dissolving the Iraqi army. I thought of that day when I read of Wednesday's confrontation between 19-year-old student Ivy Dietrich and Jeb Bush, who had been blaming President Obama for the rise of the jihadis. She told the former Florida governor, "Your brother created ISIS. " Dietrich's claim was a bit too blunt but still right on the money. It should serve as a warning to 2016 presidential contenders: Using the Iraq war as a political club against the opposition can boomerang.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
AMMAN, Jordan - When ISIS jihadis poured into Iraq from Syria in June and attacked Sheikh Abdullah al-Yawar's compound, he urged the Iraqi government to fly weapons to a nearby airfield so his Sunni tribesmen could hit back. But the Iraqi defense minister refused Yawar's offer, which might have prevented the capture of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. After Mosul fell, Yawar asked Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to let him recruit two battalions of tribesmen to police the border and prevent more jihadis from crossing.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
ERBIL, Iraqi Kurdistan - Fifty yards from my hotel, in the largely Christian neighborhood of Ainkawa, a car bomb went off last Friday. You can still smell the acrid smoke where the Nili café was shattered, killing two young men who had stepped out for a smoke not far from the U.S. consulate (which the terrorists didn't reach). But the Barista Coffee shop and Alreef Snack, just doors away, are open and patrons sit at outdoor tables. In fact, Erbil is one of the safest places in Iraq, despite far more security barriers than were visible before the Islamic State threatened the city last summer.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The visit of Iraq's Prime Minister Haidar Abadi to Washington this week will test whether the White House has any Mideast strategy beyond a nuclear deal with Iran. Even administration optimists have revised naive hopes that an accord would stabilize the region. "We can do two things at the same time," Secretary of State John Kerry told the PBS Newshour , meaning negotiate while standing up to Iranian interference in Yemen. The bigger question is whether the White House has a strategy to offset Iran's drive to dominate its neighbors, a drive that is fueling sectarian war throughout the region.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Having ignored Iraq since 2009, the Obama team is now desperately trying to devise a way to prevent its total collapse - and to roll back the jihadi state newly established on a third of Iraqi territory. The only slim hope of doing either requires the ouster of the leader whom the United States has backed for nearly a decade, Iraq's paranoid prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki. Maliki's sectarian Shiite politics have driven Iraq's Sunnis - a fifth of the country's population - into the arms of the Islamic State movement (known as ISIS)
NEWS
June 30, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
For Dick Cheney, Iraq means never having to say you're sorry. His recent interviews damning President Obama for losing Iraq make him sound as if he's suffering from amnesia. But memory loss has not blotted out his central role in creating the Iraq mess. He just refuses to admit he made any errors. His willful blindness doesn't only distort the past; it also helped create a terrorist haven in Iraq that didn't exist before America invaded. And his hubris dims any future chance of driving out the terrorists.
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