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Iraqi Government

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NEWS
August 1, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Adm. Michael Mullen, President Bush's nominee to be the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, voiced a lack of confidence in the Iraqi government yesterday, saying there "does not appear to be much political progress" in ending sectarian strife in the country. Mullen, 60, also told the Senate Armed Services Committee that the "surge" of more American military forces into Iraq has helped curtail violence there, but that he was troubled by Iraq's inability to reach political reconciliation among warring Sunni, Shiite and Kurdish factions.
NEWS
July 19, 2010 | By MOHAMMED AL DULAIMY, McClatchy Newspapers
BAGHDAD - Two suicide bombers killed 46 members of a U.S.-backed anti-al Qaeda Sunni militia in Iraq, the highest such death toll in two months, an Iraqi Interior ministry official said. Officials blamed al Qaeda in Iraq, which has frequently targeted such militiamen, though no immediate claim of responsibility was made. The militia, called the "Awakening" or Sahwa in Arabic, was formed in 2006 in al Anbar Province by tribal men and former members of al Qaeda and other insurgent groups who decided to join with the U.S. military to fight al Qaeda.
NEWS
June 16, 2004 | By William Douglas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush said yesterday that the United States would not stand in the way of rebel cleric Muqtada al-Sadr - whose forces fought American troops all spring - if he sought to play a political role in Iraq. At a White House news conference with Afghan President Hamid Karzai, Bush said it would be up to the new Iraqi government to decide whether to allow Sadr to participate in the political process. "The interim Iraqi government will deal with Sadr in the way they see fit," Bush said in the White House Rose Garden.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
After winning a $64 million court decision against the Iraqi government, a Westampton furnace manufacturer is fending off attempts by the U.S. government to have that decision reversed. In April, Consarc Corp. won the judgment against the Iraqi government in U.S. District Court in Washington after suing the Iraqis for breach of contract and fraud in connection with the sale of five highly specialized furnaces. But on June 17, the U.S. Justice Department filed a motion asking U.S. District Court Judge Stanley Sporkin to overturn his April 5 decision.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
Despite the loss of a $10 million sale of furnaces to the Iraqi government, the head of the Consarc Corp., a Westampton firm with 90 workers, said employees and stockholders should not be concerned. "There won't be any layoffs," Consarc president Raymond J. Roberts said last week. "Fortunately, we are big enough and our business sufficient to absorb this blow and keep on going. "It will put a big dent in our profits, but we expect to make a profit nevertheless," Roberts said.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Sameer N. Yacoub, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Five Iraqi soldiers were killed in a roadside bomb explosion north of Baghdad on Saturday, Iraqi officials said, as suspected Sunni militants seeking to undermine the Shiite-led government continue to target the country's security forces. A police official in Salahuddin province said the attack on a two-vehicle military convoy occurred early in the afternoon near the predominantly Sunni town of Duluiyah, 45 miles north of Baghdad. Four other soldiers were wounded in the blast, the official said.
NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Even with the burdens of combat in Afghanistan and unrest in parts of the Arab world, the United States would keep troops in Iraq beyond the agreed-upon end of 2011 if the Iraqi government asked for extra help, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Thursday. His comments gave weight to an idea that is politically sensitive in both nations and that Iraq officially rejects. During what he said would probably be his final visit to Iraq as Pentagon chief, Gates urged the fractious Iraqi government to decide "pretty quickly" whether it wants to extend the U.S. presence beyond Dec. 31 to enable continued training of Iraqi security forces.
NEWS
October 26, 2006 | By Bagila Bukharbayeva, for The Inquirer
The Inquirer asked these experts what they thought the United States needed to do next. Their responses are summarized below. Joost Hiltermann, based in Amman, Jordan, is Middle East project director of the International Crisis Group think tank in Brussels, Belgium: The United States should broker an overall political compromise between all the key Iraqi actors. Only this would enable political leaders to rein in the militias. More resources to train Iraqi security forces is key, because without such forces, no Iraqi government can enforce the law. Engaging Syria and Iran is also key, and talking to them alone will not work.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Lara Jakes, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - An Iraqi court has rejected a request to send a Hezbollah commander to the United States for trial, a decision that likely ends the Obama administration's push to prosecute the Lebanese militant held in Iraq for the 2007 killings of five American soldiers. The United States believes Ali Mussa Daqduq is a top threat to Americans in the Middle East, and had asked Baghdad to extradite him even before two Iraqi courts found him not guilty of masterminding the 2007 raid on an American military base in the holy Shiite city of Karbala.
NEWS
December 10, 2006 | By James A. Phillips and James Jay Carafano
The Baker-Hamilton Commission, formally known as the Iraq Study Group (ISG), provides a clear-eyed, balanced assessment of the situation in Iraq and a sensible and realistic way forward, with one major exception: drawing Syria and Iran into efforts to stabilize Iraq. The ISG report correctly called for the United States to: Put security and stability first. Reducing sectarian violence in Iraq is essential. This, as the report explains, must be accomplished by the Iraqi government.
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NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
AMMAN, Jordan - When ISIS jihadis poured into Iraq from Syria in June and attacked Sheikh Abdullah al-Yawar's compound, he urged the Iraqi government to fly weapons to a nearby airfield so his Sunni tribesmen could hit back. But the Iraqi defense minister refused Yawar's offer, which might have prevented the capture of Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city. After Mosul fell, Yawar asked Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to let him recruit two battalions of tribesmen to police the border and prevent more jihadis from crossing.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Peter Lems
What is the legacy of the Iraq war? Is it the staggering number of lives lost? The trillions of dollars added to the national debt? The precedent of invading a country and overthrowing a government to bolster U.S. interests? Since the war began a decade ago today, as much ink has been spilled on paper as blood on the battlefield in trying to answer these questions. But the Iraq war's greatest legacy might be the opportunity it presents for the American public to demand a standard of transparency and accountability that policymakers must meet before they can waste trillions of dollars and hundreds of thousands of lives while violating the Constitution.
NEWS
March 3, 2013 | Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Iraq's Sunni finance minister drew cheers from antigovernment protesters Friday when he announced he would resign from the government, further intensifying the country's political crisis nearly a decade after the U.S.-led invasion. In a separate incident, Iraqi officials said a Russian-made rocket fired from Syria exploded well inside Iraqi territory. The rocket is likely to heighten worries that violence from Syria's civil war could spill across the border. Finance Minister Rafia al-Issawi's decision to leave marks the first resignation of a senior Sunni member of the Shiite-led government since a wave of antigovernment protests began following the December arrest of his bodyguards on suspicion of terrorism-related activities.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Karen DeYoung, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Syrian government forces have fired at least a half-dozen short-range ballistic missiles at rebel groups in northern Syria over the last several days, according to U.S. officials, a potentially significant escalation of a civil war that has killed more than 40,000 people. U.S. officials and the group Human Rights Watch also alleged Wednesday that Syrian government forces were dropping incendiary devices similar to napalm weapons on rebel fighters in populated areas. The officials described the tactics as acts of desperation as rebels gain momentum in the nearly two-year-old fight to oust President Bashar al-Assad.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Sameer N. Yacoub, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Five Iraqi soldiers were killed in a roadside bomb explosion north of Baghdad on Saturday, Iraqi officials said, as suspected Sunni militants seeking to undermine the Shiite-led government continue to target the country's security forces. A police official in Salahuddin province said the attack on a two-vehicle military convoy occurred early in the afternoon near the predominantly Sunni town of Duluiyah, 45 miles north of Baghdad. Four other soldiers were wounded in the blast, the official said.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Lara Jakes, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - An Iraqi court has rejected a request to send a Hezbollah commander to the United States for trial, a decision that likely ends the Obama administration's push to prosecute the Lebanese militant held in Iraq for the 2007 killings of five American soldiers. The United States believes Ali Mussa Daqduq is a top threat to Americans in the Middle East, and had asked Baghdad to extradite him even before two Iraqi courts found him not guilty of masterminding the 2007 raid on an American military base in the holy Shiite city of Karbala.
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The terrorist organization that was once the scourge of the U.S. occupation in Iraq and likely is responsible for more than 100 deaths in the country over the last few days has set its sights on launching attacks inside the United States, intelligence officials said. Al-Qaeda in Iraq released a message earlier this week that threatened to strike at the "heart" of the United States, and several associates of al-Qaeda in Iraq have been arrested in the United States and Canada over the last two years, said U.S. officials, a sign that the terrorist affiliate has tried to establish a network inside North America.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | By Nabeel Al-Jurani, Associated Press
BASRA, Iraq - Followers of the anti-American Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr on Monday demanded better living conditions in Iraq on the ninth anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of their country. Iraqis have struggled with high unemployment, corruption, and an infrastructure degraded by years of sanctions, war, and economic neglect. As the violence across the country has abated, economic development has become a key concern for many Iraqis. Sheik Assad al-Nasiri said that Sadrists want the government to step up with better-paying jobs and public services, and to fight corruption now that the U.S. troops have left Iraq.
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer
POLITICIANS cashing in as soon as they leave office may be the world's second-oldest profession - and, arguably, it's a job that nobody does better than Pennsylvanians. Consider ex-governor and ex-Homeland Security chief Tom Ridge, who became a paid director of Home Depot a few years after his Department of Homeland Security urged Americans to stock up on duct tape. Or Rick Santorum, ousted senator-turned-presidential candidate - a career politician who recently has earned as much as $1 million a year, some of it consulting for companies whose agendas he fought for in Congress.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Hannah Allam, McClatchy Newspapers
BEIRUT - The U.S. military has recovered the remains of the last U.S. service member missing in Iraq, ending a nearly six-year ordeal involving shadowy militants and a tragic love story, his family said Sunday. About 1 a.m. Sunday, a U.S. officer knocked on the door of the family home in Ann Arbor, Mich., with news that Army Staff Sgt. Ahmed Al-Taie was confirmed dead. The officer had no details yet on how or when he died, said Entifadh Qanbar, Al-Taie's uncle and an aide to Iraqi politician Ahmad Chalabi.
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