CollectionsIraqi Islamic Party
IN THE NEWS

Iraqi Islamic Party

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 13, 2005 | By Nancy A. Youssef and Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iraq's principal Sunni Muslim political party said yesterday that its effort to delay Iraq's parliamentary election had failed and that it was preparing a strategy to influence the elected government following the vote on Jan. 30. The Iraqi Islamic Party's willingness to accept and engage a new government indicated a possible avenue for Sunni political participation, even though the party said it would not reverse its decision to boycott the...
NEWS
January 25, 2006 | By Nancy A. Youssef INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iraq's top Sunni Muslim political party called on its followers yesterday to use any means necessary to defend their homes, saying the government was too weak to protect Sunni neighborhoods from violent raids by the Shiite-Muslim-dominated police. The call marked a departure from the Iraqi Islamic Party's previous position backing restraint, and revealed a new level of Sunni frustration with the Shiite-led security forces. U.S. officials have frequently cited the party's participation in the Dec. 15 national elections as evidence that many Sunnis might be willing to abandon support for the Sunni-led insurgency in favor of working with the government.
NEWS
November 3, 2004 | By Nancy A. Youssef INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iraq's Sunni Muslims, who make up about a third of the country's population, are receiving mixed messages about whether to participate in national elections scheduled for January, with religious leaders calling for them to boycott the vote and political leaders urging them to participate. Independent experts are watching the battle, saying the result may be crucial to whether the elections ultimately help promote political dialogue or aggravate political tensions. Iraq's Shiite Muslims, who are the majority of the population, are being encouraged to support the elections.
NEWS
June 4, 2005 | By Nancy A. Youssef INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A campaign against insurgents by Iraqi forces has angered some of the country's Sunni Muslim leaders, who say Sunni neighborhoods were unfairly targeted. The new tensions come as efforts continue to enlist more Sunnis in running Iraq's new government, drafting a democratic constitution, and battling the insurgency. Iraqi officials last week described Operation Lightning as a one-week offensive by 40,000 Iraqi security forces, along with U.S. troops, that would sweep out insurgents.
NEWS
July 13, 2005 | By Leila Fadel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
U.S. and other foreign troops may be able to withdraw soon from some Iraqi cities, Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari said yesterday. But Iraq is not yet able to handle all its security needs and there is no timetable for reducing the number of troops from the United States and other nations, Jaafari said. "There is a plan and a threshold that the security forces, whether interior or defense, have to meet in terms of the growth in their capabilities," he said. "We believe some provinces are safe.
NEWS
October 12, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Iraqi political leaders said last night that they had agreed to an important last-minute change in the draft constitution in exchange for a promise by some prominent Sunni Arab leaders to publicly support the document in the nationwide referendum Saturday. The change would create a panel in the next parliament with the power to propose broad revisions to the constitution. In effect, the change could give the Sunnis - who were largely shut out of the constitution-writing process - a chance to help redraft the document after the December elections.
NEWS
February 1, 2005 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Prime Minister Ayad Allawi yesterday called Sunday's election a success and urged Iraqis to unite behind democracy as truckloads of ballots moved into the fortified Green Zone for the next phase of counting. Partial results could be released as early as today, but the final tally might not be known for up to 10 days. "The terrorists now know that they cannot win," Allawi said. "We are entering a new era of our history, and all Iraqis - whether they voted or not - should stand side by side to build their future.
NEWS
February 27, 2006 | By Nancy A. Youssef INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Fear of informants turning in neighbors to police or militia groups has deeply undermined community trust in many parts of Baghdad. Ahmed Ali, a 34-year-old barber in the ethnically mixed and violent Baghdad neighborhood of Dora, walked away from his business last month because he worried that his chitchat with customers would lead neighbors to suspect that he was informing on them to police - or militias, or whomever - and that he would be...
NEWS
February 12, 2005 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Insurgents shot into a crowd of people at a Baghdad bakery with a burst of AK-47 gunfire yesterday, killing at least 10, and a car bomb outside a mosque to the north of the capital killed 12 and wounded at least 20. The attacks came in neighborhoods with large Shiite Muslim populations and stoked fears of widespread sectarian strife as violence continued to increase after national elections last month. In western Baghdad, a roadside bomb killed an American soldier. Also yesterday, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld visited Baghdad to observe the training of Iraqi security forces.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When the presidential candidates finally get to their foreign policy debate, they aren't likely to dwell on Iraq. No wonder. That subject - which most Americans want to forget - doesn't reflect well on either political party. Nothing more clearly reveals the sad state we've left behind than the case of Riyadh al-Adhadh, a Sunni doctor who thought democracy could change his country. Elected deputy chairman of the Baghdad Provincial Council, Dr. Riyadh (as everyone calls him) has been jailed for the last eight months, wrongly accused of terrorism.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When the presidential candidates finally get to their foreign policy debate, they aren't likely to dwell on Iraq. No wonder. That subject - which most Americans want to forget - doesn't reflect well on either political party. Nothing more clearly reveals the sad state we've left behind than the case of Riyadh al-Adhadh, a Sunni doctor who thought democracy could change his country. Elected deputy chairman of the Baghdad Provincial Council, Dr. Riyadh (as everyone calls him) has been jailed for the last eight months, wrongly accused of terrorism.
NEWS
February 27, 2006 | By Nancy A. Youssef INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Fear of informants turning in neighbors to police or militia groups has deeply undermined community trust in many parts of Baghdad. Ahmed Ali, a 34-year-old barber in the ethnically mixed and violent Baghdad neighborhood of Dora, walked away from his business last month because he worried that his chitchat with customers would lead neighbors to suspect that he was informing on them to police - or militias, or whomever - and that he would be...
NEWS
January 25, 2006 | By Nancy A. Youssef INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iraq's top Sunni Muslim political party called on its followers yesterday to use any means necessary to defend their homes, saying the government was too weak to protect Sunni neighborhoods from violent raids by the Shiite-Muslim-dominated police. The call marked a departure from the Iraqi Islamic Party's previous position backing restraint, and revealed a new level of Sunni frustration with the Shiite-led security forces. U.S. officials have frequently cited the party's participation in the Dec. 15 national elections as evidence that many Sunnis might be willing to abandon support for the Sunni-led insurgency in favor of working with the government.
NEWS
October 12, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Iraqi political leaders said last night that they had agreed to an important last-minute change in the draft constitution in exchange for a promise by some prominent Sunni Arab leaders to publicly support the document in the nationwide referendum Saturday. The change would create a panel in the next parliament with the power to propose broad revisions to the constitution. In effect, the change could give the Sunnis - who were largely shut out of the constitution-writing process - a chance to help redraft the document after the December elections.
NEWS
July 13, 2005 | By Leila Fadel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
U.S. and other foreign troops may be able to withdraw soon from some Iraqi cities, Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari said yesterday. But Iraq is not yet able to handle all its security needs and there is no timetable for reducing the number of troops from the United States and other nations, Jaafari said. "There is a plan and a threshold that the security forces, whether interior or defense, have to meet in terms of the growth in their capabilities," he said. "We believe some provinces are safe.
NEWS
June 4, 2005 | By Nancy A. Youssef INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A campaign against insurgents by Iraqi forces has angered some of the country's Sunni Muslim leaders, who say Sunni neighborhoods were unfairly targeted. The new tensions come as efforts continue to enlist more Sunnis in running Iraq's new government, drafting a democratic constitution, and battling the insurgency. Iraqi officials last week described Operation Lightning as a one-week offensive by 40,000 Iraqi security forces, along with U.S. troops, that would sweep out insurgents.
NEWS
February 12, 2005 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Insurgents shot into a crowd of people at a Baghdad bakery with a burst of AK-47 gunfire yesterday, killing at least 10, and a car bomb outside a mosque to the north of the capital killed 12 and wounded at least 20. The attacks came in neighborhoods with large Shiite Muslim populations and stoked fears of widespread sectarian strife as violence continued to increase after national elections last month. In western Baghdad, a roadside bomb killed an American soldier. Also yesterday, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld visited Baghdad to observe the training of Iraqi security forces.
NEWS
February 1, 2005 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Prime Minister Ayad Allawi yesterday called Sunday's election a success and urged Iraqis to unite behind democracy as truckloads of ballots moved into the fortified Green Zone for the next phase of counting. Partial results could be released as early as today, but the final tally might not be known for up to 10 days. "The terrorists now know that they cannot win," Allawi said. "We are entering a new era of our history, and all Iraqis - whether they voted or not - should stand side by side to build their future.
NEWS
January 13, 2005 | By Nancy A. Youssef and Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iraq's principal Sunni Muslim political party said yesterday that its effort to delay Iraq's parliamentary election had failed and that it was preparing a strategy to influence the elected government following the vote on Jan. 30. The Iraqi Islamic Party's willingness to accept and engage a new government indicated a possible avenue for Sunni political participation, even though the party said it would not reverse its decision to boycott the...
NEWS
November 3, 2004 | By Nancy A. Youssef INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iraq's Sunni Muslims, who make up about a third of the country's population, are receiving mixed messages about whether to participate in national elections scheduled for January, with religious leaders calling for them to boycott the vote and political leaders urging them to participate. Independent experts are watching the battle, saying the result may be crucial to whether the elections ultimately help promote political dialogue or aggravate political tensions. Iraq's Shiite Muslims, who are the majority of the population, are being encouraged to support the elections.
|
|
|
|
|