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Iraqi Refugees

NEWS
May 1, 1991 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than a month, Mohammad Mansen Radi and his family of eight have been living in the bombed-out ruin of a house in a fashionable neighborhood near the Karun River. They came with the flood of Shiite refugees who fled Basra and other southern Iraqi cities after the bloody crackdown on the southern rebels by Saddam Hussein's forces. "There is no electricity here, but it is better than in Basra, where there is no food," said Radi. His family is one of several dozen that have taken up residence in this neighborhood, which was badly damaged in the Iran-Iraq war. The brick walls are pocked with bullet holes.
NEWS
April 30, 1991 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
At night here, the people can hear the echo of gunfire and artillery in the west from Basra, where fighting still goes on between forces loyal to Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein and Shiite rebels. In daytime near the border, the Iranians and the Iraqi refugees can see the smoke rising from Basra, from fires that resulted from the battles. Each night, bands of 20 to 30 Shias armed with Kalashnikov assault rifles and rocket-propelled grenades leave their safe havens here and return to Basra to kill.
NEWS
April 29, 1991 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. military yesterday began airlifting Shiite Muslim refugees from southern Iraq to a camp in Saudi Arabia, where they are expected to stay until it is safe for them to return home. Five planes yesterday carried about 340 refugees from a U.S. Army-protected camp in Safwan to a camp erected by the Saudi government in Rafha. By tomorrow, the daily number of passengers is expected to increase to as many as 1,500, so that by early next month, up to 15,000 Iraqi Shiites will be moved to Rafha.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press, Reuters and the Los Angeles Times contributed to this article, as did Inquirer correspondent Ted Morello at the United Nations
President Bush said yesterday that U.S. troops would stay in northern Iraq as long as necessary to help protect Kurdish refugee camps there. "They're going to stay there as long as it takes to make sure these refugees are being taken care of, and not a minute longer," Bush said, but it was not clear how many weeks or months that would be. But Bush got some help yesterday when the secretary-general of the United Nations in effect did an...
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
More than 600 British marine commandos entered the northern city of Zakho today to set up permanent patrols, and allied forces gave Iraqi police 48 hours to leave town. At 1:30 p.m. (6:30 a.m. EDT), three companies of commandos landed by helicopter and took up key positions in the northern, southern and eastern parts of this town, near here U.S. troops are setting up a secure haven for hundreds of thousands of Kurdish refugees. The commandos reported encountering no resistance from the Iraqis, who were still patrolling Zakho today despite U.S. warnings that they not interfere with the relief effort.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Hundreds of joyful U.S. troops in armored columns rolled across the desert today, homeward bound in a swift pullout from southern Iraq. U.S. officers said the troops were moving into assembly areas in Saudi Arabia for transfer home. Their withdrawal left in doubt the future of the more than 40,000 refugees who found American and Saudi protection there. Nearly half of the 540,000 American troops in the Persian Gulf War have left the theater, the U.S. Central Command said. In announcing yesterday its intention to withdraw from southern Iraqi in a matter of days, the command urged the refugees to move into the demilitarized zone being established along the 120-mile-long border between Iraq and Kuwait.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though their native land remains in turmoil, some Iraqi-Americans are mounting efforts to get emergency medical aid to those inside Iraq still suffering from the Persian Gulf war. On Saturday, a group of volunteers from the Detroit area is scheduled to take about $250,000 raised in the United States to Jordan, where they plan to buy medical supplies for use in Iraq. The group, expected to include up to 15 Iraqi-born Americans, hopes to deliver the medical aid personally inside Iraq, according to Paul Vincent, a lawyer who is heading the relief operation.
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