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Ireland

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2000 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Visitors to the Sedgwick Cultural Center in Mount Airy will find themselves transported across the Atlantic this fall. To open its season, the neighborhood art center is staging a wide-ranging celebration of Ireland inspired by the work of four local artists who traveled to the Emerald Isle, and including a concert by Karan Casey, former lead singer of the acclaimed Irish American quintet Solas. Tonight's artists' reception, which is free and open to the public, marks the official opening of "Images of Ireland," featuring the work of tilemaker Kate Hochner and photographers Judith and Solomon Levy and Sandra C. Davis.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | Associated Press
DUBLIN - Police yesterday arrested Ireland's most notorious Muslim convert over his reported death threats against President Obama. Police said the arrest of Khalid Kelly, 44, dubbed "Taliban Terry" by Dubliners, came 10 days before Obama's arrival in Ireland and four days after the British newspaper the Sunday Mirror printed an interview with Kelly. He is Ireland's most outspoken supporter of al Qaeda and its slain founder, Osama bin Laden. Kelly was quoted as telling the newspaper that he expected al Qaeda to kill Obama during his visit to Ireland in part because the country's police force is poorly armed.
SPORTS
June 26, 1994 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The World Cup will be missing one of its best known coaches for a game. Jack Charlton, the flinty Englishman who has become a folk hero in Ireland for his successes coaching its national team, will have to watch his players try to reach the second round of the World Cup from the stands. Yesterday, Charlton became only the second coach in World Cup history to be suspended for a game, for his "unsporting conduct" and "ill-mannered behavior" during Friday's 2-1 loss to Mexico.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Echoes of Ireland will be performed at Upper Darby High School Performing Arts Center at 8 p.m. Saturday. Performing will be Mick Moloney, a Renaissance man of traditional Irish music; Eugene O'Donnell, an All-Ireland fiddle champion; Regan Wick, the North American Irish step dance champion, and Seamus Egan, master of the flute, tin whistle, uilleann pipes, banjo and mandolin. Reserved seats are $9, and general admission is $8. The center is at School Lane and Lansdowne Avenue, and the box office is open from 2:30 to 6 p.m. weekdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Run of the Country is precariously perched on fissures and fault lines. It is a daring mix of comedy and tragedy that takes place along the border that partitions Ireland, but its strength lies in its consideration of the bitterness and guilt that can divide families. Shane Connaughton, who wrote the screenplay for My Left Foot, has adapted and markedly lightened his own novel. The blend of broad humor and far more serious material surely would not work outside Ireland, a place where wit and woe walk hand in hand.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | By Gwen Florio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The parks are closed. Bike trails, too. Fishing? Doubtful. And don't even think about playing the ponies. They aren't running. Bottom line? If you're bound for Britain, stick to the cities. And if you're heading to Ireland for St. Patrick's Day, you've got an excuse to lollygag in a pub: No parades. That's the advice that British and Irish tourism agencies are offering the hundreds of people who call each day, worried about how the foot-and-mouth disease outbreak will affect their vacations.
NEWS
January 25, 2009 | By Kathleen Heady FOR THE INQUIRER
"Mom, what did that sign say? Which exit do we take to Athlone?" I had all I could handle driving a manual-shift car on the left side of the road through the narrow lanes of County Offaly, Ireland, and my 83-year-old mother was no help as a navigator. I soon learned I would have to get around the roundabouts and find the right exits on my own. My mother and I had visited Ireland once before, but we had not traveled to County Offaly, which is in the center of the country and a bit off the usual tourist routes.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Am I letting my imagination run rampant, or am I getting a signal, strong and clear? All during my witness of Novel Stages' "Romeo and Juliet" I picked up an almost subliminal message which went something like this: Omigod, David Bassuk is attempting to Ardenize his Shakespeare! The conceit is far from inconceivable. I've had the notion for some time that the hand on the tiller at Novel Stages is more than a little envious of the Arden Theater Co., which preceded it on the local scene by a mere few months, for the apparent ease with which the Ardens have transmuted the classics - Shakespeare, in particular - into terms that appeal greatly to a modern audience, and especially to the younger end of the demographic scale.
NEWS
November 25, 1986
Politicians make such strange bedfellows. An interesting article written by Jimmy Breslin appeared on the Nov. 13 Op- ed Page. A 79-year-old man was arrested in 1981 for trying to buy guns for his side of the Irish problem. He was arrested and acquitted. Being a local folk hero he led the New York parade on St. Patrick's Day. Cardinal Terence Cooke refused to stand on the steps when the parade, with him a leader, passed by. And, to quote the author, Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D., N.Y.)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1986 | By MARY FLANNERY, Daily News Staff Writer
It's just past noon on Saturday. You switch to the AM radio dial and decide not to listen to the all-talk, yack-yack stations, the raucous top-40 stations or the hyper sports play-by-play stations. So you tune to WVCH (AM/740) and listen to the low, dulcet tones of Will Regan. From noon until 2 p.m. on Saturdays, Regan replaces the Gospel format of WVCH with "The Irish Hours. " It's a program of popular Irish music mixed in with Regan's soft patter about the wonderful music, the wonderful singers, the wonderful Irish people.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hundreds of people crawling Center City bars this weekend in green shirts and shamrock hats probably had no idea there was a real Irish dignitary in their midst - Deputy Prime Minister Joan Burton. Burton, who is also the leader of the Labour Party and the Minister for Social Protection, is on a whirlwind St. Patrick's weekend tour of Philadelphia, Boston and Pittsburgh to promote continued economic ties between the United States and Ireland. On Saturday afternoon, she addressed about 200 leaders of the local Irish community at a reception in Center City.
TRAVEL
February 23, 2015 | By Robert Carden, For The Inquirer
DUBLIN, Ireland - In town for a few days, and not looking for roots or relatives, I'm here for the whiskey and beer. I am, however, accompanied by an intellectually curious and well-bred woman who is my wife, along with our college-age kids. And while she's a pretty good sport, having indulged most of my bad habits for more than 20 years, asking her to spend her only time in Dublin holed up in saloons is a bit much. So to make the trip work, I had to steel up and at least try to generate a healthy interest in museums, churches, and the like.
TRAVEL
January 19, 2015 | By Ed Gallagher, For The Inquirer
After years of putting off our trip to the Old Sod, my wife and I agreed that I would do all of the driving on our Ireland visit, while she would do all of the navigating - and all of the laughing at my driving. Which tells you that, in Ireland, we would rent a car. No tour bus for us; our agenda would be our own. Anywhere, any time, just get in and go. I was, however, forewarned by veteran travelers of a difference that must be experienced to be appreciated. It is the reason for my wife's laughter.
NEWS
December 16, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
If you're looking for a holiday gift for that special runner in your life - especially a runner who may be struggling with training or not sure what to do next - take a look at the Believe Training Journal , a project from professional runners Lauren Fleshman, who has been an NCAA and USA Championship winner, and Roisin McGettigan-Dumas, who ran for Ireland in the 2008 Olympics and is a sports psychology consultant. Believe is a heavy volume, more than 230 pages wrapped in a rubber cover.
SPORTS
December 16, 2014 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
At their Garnet Valley home, Jordan Ireland is the typical big sister to Maddie. She's the responsible one, the one in charge, the more controlling of the two. Separated by just 17 months and one grade, Maddie, 16, jokingly calls Jordan, 18, "mom. " When the two guards for the Garnet Valley girls' basketball team are on the court, however, things are a little bit different. On the floor for the Jaguars (3-0), Maddie is the one Jordan listens to, the one who grabs the bull by the horns, the sister who has ideas on what the team should do next.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Thursday is a great day for the Irish - on Philadelphia stages, that is - as the decade-young Inis Nua Theatre Company and two-year-old Irish Heritage Theatre present the next chapters in their catalogs of Celtic-inflected plays with the openings of, respectively, Ciphers by Dawn King and A Night With Lady G , three one-act comedies by Lady Augusta Gregory. What unites these companies is their dedication to plays that emanate from or relate to the British Isles - Ireland, obviously, in the case of Irish Heritage Theatre, and, for Inis Nua, England, Scotland, and Wales, as well.
SPORTS
September 4, 2014 | BY JOHN McGONIGAL, Daily News Staff Writer mcgonij@phillynews.com
STATE COLLEGE - Jet lag is common for those who travel long distances. Roughly a 7-hour flight from Dublin to Pennsylvania? Yeah, that normally will put someone in a groggy, out-of-sync feeling for 24 hours or so. But the Energizer Bunny himself, James Franklin, said he and his coaching staff don't feel the effects of jet lag. In fact, they don't even use terms like "jet lag" or "tired. " "We don't use those words," Franklin said yesterday at his weekly news conference with a solemn look before changing moods.
SPORTS
August 29, 2014 | BY JOHN McGONIGAL, Daily News Staff Writer mcgonij@phillynews.com
DUBLIN - James Franklin hasn't seen too much of Ireland. At least, not yet. Franklin and the Nittany Lions arrived in Ireland early yesterday morning, but didn't visit Temple Bar or Dublin Castle. They did have dinner last night at the Guinness Storehouse, a top Dublin attraction. The first-year coach, ahead of his inaugural game at Penn State - a clash with Central Florida on Saturday at Dublin's Croke Park - has made it known that this is a business trip. And so far, that's what it has been for the Lions.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
PHILLY'S own Maria Walsh took home the title yesterday in the Rose of Tralee, an international competition based in Kerry, Ireland, celebrating Irish culture. Walsh, a studio manager at Anthropologie, is the first Philly girl to win. Walsh is full of Philly spirit. She told the Independent about her win: "I'm not the only short-haired, tattooed or even long-haired, tattooed woman out there, and I'm looking forward to rolling up my sleeves and just seeing what happens. " Walsh, who was born in Boston and moved back to Ireland when she was 7 before returning to the U.S., wasn't even the front-runner.
SPORTS
August 6, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
FRIENDS OF RECENT college grads Pat Connaghan and Jess Koci are most likely green with envy. Connaghan, who played basketball at University of the Sciences, and Koci, who played at La Salle, are among 13 international athletes headed to Ireland this month thanks to Victory Scholarships they received through the Sport Changes Life Foundation. They will spend a year mentoring at-risk youth while playing ball and attending graduate business classes at the Institute of Technology in Carlow, about 50 miles south of Dublin.
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