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Ireland

BUSINESS
December 11, 1988 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yellow characters glowed on her computer screen as Eleanor McMahon puzzled out a payment problem for a New York Life Insurance Co. policyholder in the United States. "It's amazing that I can press a button and the information has gone 3,000 miles across an ocean," she said. From her desk in this village in scenic southwest Ireland, she can instruct a computer in Clinton, N.J., to issue a check to a member of the company's group health plan in the United States, or dispatch a letter seeking more information before payment can be approved.
NEWS
March 17, 2002 | By Sharon H. Fitzgerald FOR THE INQUIRER
Oh, for a month in Ireland. You need that much time to drink it in - the stunning landscapes, the lilt of friendly voices, the charm of country crossroads and, of course, the Guinness. But, if you're like me and a month is not an option, there's good news: You can see southern Ireland, and see it right, in two weeks, 10 days if you really push. What you need is a reliable, small car and an unflappable driver. It helps if you are as lucky as my husband and I and travel with another couple who share the same objective - to stop when the mood strikes.
SPORTS
November 23, 1988 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Join the Army and see the world. Go to places such as Dublin, Ireland. In shoulder pads, yet. Alas, the Army lost a battle in Europe, this one a 38-24 decision to Boston College on Saturday in the Emerald Isle Classic before 42,525 mostly confused but highly entertained fans at Dublin's Lansdowne Road Stadium. It was the first NCAA Division I-A game ever played in Europe and, all cultural experiences aside, it left Army a bit behind in its preparation for the 89th meeting between the Cadets and Navy at Veterans Stadium on Dec. 3. "Except for the outcome of the game, it was a great experience," said Jack Hecker, one of coach Jim Young's assistants.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
David F. Dodd, 58, an executive with a medical advertising firm who loved games, the blues and Ireland, died Tuesday at Pennsylvania Hospital. He was a resident of Society Hill. He was, said his longtime friend Harry Sweeney, "a fierce competitor. His idea of a hot time was to come over to the house and play Trivial Pursuit. He would play till you were ready to drop. " "He was a good winner and good loser," said Sweeney. "But he really liked to win. He had this little smile, and you could tell from that when he was going to get you. (Then)
SPORTS
September 2, 2012 | Associated Press
Notre Dame's trip to Ireland could not have gone much better. The Fighting Irish eased in their new quarterback, showed they have a couple of capable replacements for their suspended star running back and even got a touchdown from a 300-pound defensive lineman. Theo Riddick and George Atkinson both ran for two scores and defensive end Stephon Tuitt returned a fumble 77 yards for another TD as Notre Dame routed Navy, 50-10, in Saturday's season opener in Dublin, Ireland. A crowd of 49,000, mostly visiting Americans, filled Dublin's Aviva Stadium for the first U.S. college game in Ireland since 1996, when the same two teams played in the Emerald Isle Classic.
NEWS
May 1, 1986
I was enraged to see that Norman Tebbit, chairman of the British Conservative Party, feels the United States must "repay" Britain for the use of its airfields for the Libyan adventure by, among meeting other demands, delivering the U.S.-U.K. Supplementary Extradition Treaty. First of all, for as many times as our nation has bailed out the British, Mr. Tebbit's scorecard of who owes what to whom could not possibly show a deficit of advantage to his side for many Libyas to come. Second, coming from a government that refuses to allow extradition of terrorist "soccer fans" to Belgium or Sikh extremists to India (a commonwealth nation)
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is only one subject of public conversation in this country this week, as the host of a national radio talk show found out yesterday. He put this question to his listeners: Given the High Court's ruling Monday banning a 14-year-old rape victim from having an abortion in England, should Ireland have a referendum on the subject? Nearly 12,000 people telephoned in less than two hours, 130 every minute. Their vote was 3-2 in favor. But it was the sheer volume of calls that was astounding.
SPORTS
June 15, 2012 | The Inquirer Staff
Fernando Torres scored a goal in each half, and David Silva and substitute Cesc Fabregas added the others as Spain beat Ireland, 4-0, in Gdansk, Poland, and eliminated the Irish from the European Championship with their most lopsided loss in 41 years. The Spaniards' dazzling ball control, dizzying passing game, and deluge of shots were way too much for the Irish. Spain, which leads Group C along with Croatia with four points, dominated the tempo and scoring opportunities through its quick combinations and precise passing.
NEWS
March 2, 1999 | By Debbie Woodell
He was the last person, say friends of Robert Drake, that you would expect such tragedy to strike. "There is a very bright kind of energy about him," says one. "That's what makes this news really hard to take. " "This news" is that Drake, the renowned author and editor of gay literature who had been living in Philadelphia for three years, was brutally beaten in his home in Ireland, where he moved last summer to work on a novel. Two men were arrested last week in the Jan. 30 attack in the small town of Sligo.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1928, Frank Algeo, then a lad of 21, left his home in the Irish county of Donegal, boarded a ship in County Derry and sailed to Philadelphia. In 1958, Nora Campbell, then 14, left her home in Donegal, boarded a plane in County Clare and flew to Philadelphia. And today, in 1988, Campbell and Algeo are among the thousands in the Philadelphia area who can trace their heritage to Donegal, Ireland's most northwest county. On Saturday and Sunday, they and hundreds more of Donegal's sons and daughters - and certainly some cousins from other counties - will gather at St. Joseph's University to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Donegal Society of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania's oldest Irish county society and one of the oldest in the nation.
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