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NEWS
December 14, 2000 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Kevin F. O'Dowd, a Philadelphia-area man who was a lifelong Irish-American activist dedicated to promoting peace and justice in Northern Ireland, died Saturday of pancreatic cancer. He was 37 and lived in San Francisco. O'Dowd, a resident of San Francisco for the past eight years, was general manager for Renaissance Management Inc. and had previously worked for the company in Boston. Last year O'Dowd received an official proclamation from San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown for his work for human rights in the North of Ireland.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irish-Americans yesterday took the opportunity of this year's bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution to examine the constitutional promise of the 18- month-old Anglo-Irish agreement that was designed to resolve the troubles of Northern Ireland. At the Friends Meeting House in Center City, about 75 Philadelphia Irish- Americans listened to some stern lectures, drank strong coffee and engaged in hearty debate over the range of political and economic issues facing Northern Ireland.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So, St. Patrick's Day comes toward us, and spring is at hand. Is it too much to hope that this spring, this year, will bring real peace to Northern Ireland? The sons and daughters of Erin are out parading in cities throughout the United States, honoring a fifth-century bishop called Patricius. He's their man. But a good many of the marchers - and the people they pass - are also thinking about peace negotiations for their friends and kin in Northern Ireland. In the Philadelphia region, ties between the Irish-American community and Ireland remain serious, and binding in ways that are sometimes difficult to discern.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | By COLMAN McCARTHY
Why do so many of the 40 million Irish-Americans fritter away St. Patrick's Day in booze, bathos and blarney? Why isn't this a moment, instead, to reflect dispassionately on Ireland as a divided homeland and a scene of entrenched human-rights violations and economic discrimination against Roman Catholics by the British government? The annual March 17 orgy - this year it falls on a weekend when Irish pubs are already packed - is a mix of green beer, off-key renditions of "Danny Boy" and "Galway Bay," and perhaps a tear shed for the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | SAM PSORAS/ DAILY NEWS
State Supreme Court Justice James T. McDermott kisses Annie Finn's cheek at Dilworth Plaza yesterday as the city celebrated St. Patrick's Day by paying tribute to 27 Irish-American patriots who fought for U.S. independence 213 years ago. Finn, of Germantown, is from County Mayo, Ireland. McDermott was the featured speaker.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Some City Council members are ready to instruct public school teachers on telling kids about the Irish famine and immigration of the 1840s. Council's education committee will hold a hearing Tuesday to take testimony from Irish-American organizations and others on the need for children to learn about the Irish famine, which lasted from 1845 to 1851. The famine triggered one of the greatest immigrations in U.S. history. Some 1 million starving, sickly and desperate Irish sought survival in this country between 1846 and 1851.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
It's not that big an ethnic accomplishment - not as monumental as the first Polish pope or first African-American mayor - but turning to the Auld Sod for Philadelphia's new police commissioner was a notable event in the city's Irish community. "I think that there's pride any time you see an Irish-American make it, but I think so many of us have made it over the years, we're not faced with the same discrimination we had in our grandparents' years," said Jack Worrall, former president of the Federation of Irish American Societies in the Delaware Valley.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | BY JACK McKINNEY
Now that the election results are in from the United States, people here are pondering where the real President Clinton will stand on the loaded question of how to resuscitate the comatose peace process in Northern Ireland. Both the pro-British majority and the nationalist minority are apparently optimistic - but for dramatically opposite reasons. The loyalists believe that with re-election concerns now behind him, the real Clinton can stop pandering to what they perceive to be an influential Irish-American vote and let them get on with restoring a status quo that precludes any meaningful nationalist participation in the affairs of the British-administered six-county statelet.
NEWS
March 17, 2004 | By Thomas Belton
I find it interesting that on St. Patrick's Day, all the Irish American dilettantes wear green sweaters and buttons adorned with slogans like "Kiss me, I'm Irish" or "Erin go bragh. " As if most of them know what that quaint Gaelic saying really means ("Ireland forever"). There are three degrees of Irish American: the ones just off the boat; the second- or third-generation Americans, who still speak with a bit of the brogue; and the rest of us, who have only heard the legends and tall stories at family gatherings about the diaspora of the Potato Blight, the coffin ships, and the English absentee landowners who drove our ancestors out of Ireland for the land.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By John Loughran, Special to The Inquirer
The songs that many Americans may be singing today in celebration of St. Patrick's Day might be more Irish-American than Irish, say several local musicians who themselves play different varieties of Irish music. "It's certainly Irish-American," Seamus Egan of Lansdowne said of the songs and music often associated with St. Patrick's Day. "It promotes a very romantic view of Ireland. It's not what people would be playing a hundred years ago sitting around the fire," said Egan, who plays the Uilleann pipes, flute, banjo, mandolin and tin whistle with his sisters and with the band The Green Fields of America.
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NEWS
March 20, 2016
The Immortal Irishman The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero By Timothy Egan Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 448 pp. $30 Reviewed by Paul Jablow From his earliest years in Ireland to the battlefields of the Civil War to his mysterious death in an icy Montana river, Thomas Francis Meagher was driven by visions of freeing his native Ireland from the yoke of Britain. It was a mirage constantly fading into the horizon. Born to family wealth he easily tossed aside, Meagher had been sentenced in 1848 to hang for revolutionary activities.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
People are suddenly asking Dwight Evans for lottery picks. That happens when you are two-for-two betting long on the most important political offices in Pennsylvania. In back-to-back elections, the Democratic state representative from West Oak Lane has wagered and won big with his support of the relatively unknown Tom Wolf for governor last year and Jim Kenney for the Democratic nomination for mayor of Philadelphia last month. Evans now can boast of having the ear of both men and an inside track on favors and future political appointments.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU LISTEN carefully, you can still hear Joe Montgomery singing "Danny Boy. " It's been some years since Joe graced the choir loft of Transfiguration Church in West Philadelphia with his distinctive Irish tenor. But there are those who swear they can still hear his voice raised in those songs that never fail to stir the heart or bring a tear to the eye of a true Irish patriot. Joe Montgomery is gone, but the work he did for the Irish community in Philadelphia and the people he inspired with his devotion to the rites and traditions of those places live on wherever green is worn.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number of babies born with Tay-Sachs in the United States has fallen dramatically since the 1970s, when Jews began to be screened for the defective gene that causes the rare neurological disorder. Now, Einstein Medical Center in North Philadelphia is leading a study to determine whether carrier screening should be recommended for another ethnic group - Irish Americans. Carriers of the Tay-Sachs gene are healthy, but the offspring of two carriers have a 25 percent chance of inheriting two bad genes and thus the disease, which is usually fatal by age 5. Limited evidence in medical literature suggests that Americans of Irish descent have an elevated carrier frequency, but estimates vary wildly.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Enda Kenny , Taoiseach (TEE-shock, Irish for Big Chief) of Ireland, left troubles home in Dublin when he flew into Philadelphia at dawn Friday. The prime minister is presiding over a bundle of miseries: Managing an unpopular multibillion-euro bailout of the nation's profligate banks. Making ugly budget cuts amid tough negotiations with tight-fisted global bankers and Eurocrats. Bailing out deadbeat borrowers, an initiative that has frugal Irish who pay their bills steaming. And watching frustrated job-seekers support leftist and nationalist rivals, or leave for the mines in Canada and Australia, restarting the long emigration the Irish thought they had left behind.
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom McGrath, owner of the Black Sheep Pub in Manhattan, is an ultra-marathoner of some repute. A native of Ireland who first came to the United States in 1969 to play Gaelic football, he has, among other astonishing accomplishments, run across the United States in 53 days, run 24 hours nonstop numerous times, and completed several 1,000-mile solo runs. Many of his runs are dedicated to charity, such as raising money for the pediatrics unit at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. On Friday, McGrath, 61, will embark on another long jaunt on behalf of a worthy cause.
NEWS
January 2, 2009
Club Totals 2. Quaker City . . . 93.900 3. South Philly . . . 91.550 4. Ferko . . . 87.500 5. Avalon . . . 86.650 6. Polish American . . . 86.350 7. Greater Kensington . . . 86.100 8. Woodland . . . 83.650 9. Hegeman . . . 81.850 10. Uptown . . . 78.450 11. Durning . . . 72.700 12. Duffy . . . 70.750 13. Greater Overbrook . . . 62.150 14. Broomall . . . 60.750 ...
NEWS
March 17, 2008 | By Noel Dolan
I had my first real introduction to Irish American culture when I met my husband in 1989. Coming into his big Irish Catholic family, I soon learned that the heart of being Irish isn't the color green, beer, leprechauns or shamrocks. No, the core identity for the Irish is a good story, and everything else is a variation on this: religion, family lore, a song or a joke. I found this out at one of the first dinners I attended at the Dolan house. Looking for salad dressing, someone asked, "Please pass the Italian," at which point the nearest of the seven brothers lifted me from my seat.
NEWS
June 29, 2005
The public debate continues over the decision to have mandatory African and African American history studies in the Philadelphia schools. Here are a variety of opinions on the subject. The decision to require African American history in Philadelphia public schools is good one - and long overdue. The need for a comprehensive approach to understanding the role of African people in the development of the United States is illustrated by a factual question raised by The Inquirer's coverage of the controversy over the decision.
FOOD
March 17, 2005 | By Caitlin Francke FOR THE INQUIRER
Margaret Johnson grew up in a traditional Irish American family outside Boston. But she never ate anything called a fool, not to mention a flummery. It wasn't until she began researching recipes for her collection of Irish cookbooks that she discovered the rich tradition of Irish baking and desserts. "I was almost like a food investigator," Johnson, a retired schoolteacher who lives in New York, says of her search for unique dishes at Irish guest houses and restaurants. Everywhere she went, she coaxed bakers and chefs into giving her their recipes.
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