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Irish Catholics

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NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
DUBLIN - An international conference celebrating Roman Catholicism opened Sunday in Ireland against a backdrop of anger over child abuse cover-ups and evidence of declining faith in core church beliefs. About 12,000 Catholics, many from overseas, gathered for an open-air Mass in a half-full Dublin stadium at the start of the Eucharistic Congress, a weeklong event organized by the Vatican every four years in a different part of the world. The global gathering, begun in the 19th century and last held in Quebec in 2008, highlights the Catholic Church's belief in transubstantiation, the idea that bread and wine transforms during Mass into the actual body and blood of Jesus Christ.
NEWS
August 15, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Dear God: I know how busy you must be. That's why it occurred to me that you don't have time to read our papers and your TV reception might not be good. So I thought I'd drop you a note about how things are going here. You wouldn't believe how loved you are on this planet, and how much is being done in your name. I might as well start in Northern Ireland, where you've always been big. The Irish Protestants are so devoted to you they do everything possible to make life miserable for the Irish Catholics, because they don't think the Irish Catholics have the right approach toward worshiping you. And the Irish Catholics do what they can to make life miserable for the Irish Protestants for essentially the same reasons.
NEWS
May 8, 2011 | By Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
BELFAST, Northern Ireland - Northern Ireland's two major parties will return to power atop a joint Catholic-Protestant government with increased support for their policies of compromise and peacemaking, electoral returns Saturday showed. The British Protestants of the Democratic Unionists and the Irish Catholics of Sinn Fein - bitter enemies for decades but, since 2007, partners in government - strengthened their hold on the Northern Ireland Assembly, the bedrock of the province's cross-community government.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the notable Irish American figures who emerged from this region in the early 20th century was Archbishop Thomas Francis Kennedy of Conshohocken. His work during this period helped form a strong bond between the Catholic Church in Rome and the Catholic community in the United States. At the time of Kennedy's birth in 1858, the Irish were the largest Catholic group in the Philadelphia area, according to an account by local historian Edward Hocker found in the library of the Historical Society of Montgomery County.
NEWS
November 12, 1999 | BY CLETUS MCBRIDE
It seems the story of the Irish famine is getting short shrift in Philadelphia schools. According to Bob Gessler, past president of Division 87 and Philadelphia County board president of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the mid-19th-century famine in Ireland merits only about one page, maybe less, in textbooks. To Irish-Americans, that should not be acceptable. As with any factor causing or affecting great migrations in history, such as the Holocaust and the slave trade, the famine tragedy should be told in its entirety.
NEWS
September 29, 2005 | By Bernadette McKenzie Kutufaris
Like many Catholics in the Philadelphia area, I felt a stream of mixed emotions last week when Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham released the grand jury report detailing the sexual abuse of many children by priests from the archdiocese. I hastily found the documents online and read through them, afraid of what and whom I would find in the 400 pages. It was to my great dismay that I found a handful of priests listed that I did indeed know. I was even further dismayed when reading about the alleged actions of the retired cardinal.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | BY CHUCK STONE
The new information excited me. And it humbled me at the same time. I'll explain why in a minute. But it goes back 20 years when I thought I was unique. Crusading alongside my Irish brothers and sisters for one Ireland, this African-American identified deeply with their freedom struggle. Irish unity and Irish Catholic civil rights in Northern Ireland were my causes, too. When I spent 10 days in Belfast in 1981, I immediately became a part of West Belfast.
NEWS
September 2, 1994
Doesn't it always happen this way? You fight about something for 700 or 800 years, and suddenly you get tired of it. Supposedly, you were fighting because you and your enemy were of different religions or races or classes or ethnicities. But deep down, you just wanted the land cleared of the other guy. And as time went by, if you couldn't find your actual enemy, you killed someone who looked like him, or was related to him, or was sitting on a barstool on which he had been known to sit. And he did the same to you. And, oddly enough, hard feelings built up. This kind of a habitual hatred is hard to shake.
NEWS
August 10, 1987
There are few sports that Irish-Americans enjoy more than tweaking the British lion's tail. While the so-called MacBride principles being advanced in American state and local legislatures don't quite have the British lion roaring in pain, they are making him decidely uncomfortable. But the problem with the principles is that whatever pain they may cause will be felt most in the lower reaches of Northern Ireland society by the very people - Irish Catholics - whom they are designed to benefit.
NEWS
January 24, 2004 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She is convinced that war is outdated, and love can conquer all. She thinks American foreign policy is appalling, and finds this country's reliance on guns to exact justice equally abhorent. And she entreated those gathered in a classroom at Rutgers University-Camden yesterday to do something about it. M?iread Corrigan Maguire has some strong opinions, ones often not embraced by the world around her. But the Nobel peace laureate delivered them unflinchingly yesterday with a smile and a twinkle in her eye, and an unrelenting optimism that "the human family" could overcome all differences.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
DUBLIN - An international conference celebrating Roman Catholicism opened Sunday in Ireland against a backdrop of anger over child abuse cover-ups and evidence of declining faith in core church beliefs. About 12,000 Catholics, many from overseas, gathered for an open-air Mass in a half-full Dublin stadium at the start of the Eucharistic Congress, a weeklong event organized by the Vatican every four years in a different part of the world. The global gathering, begun in the 19th century and last held in Quebec in 2008, highlights the Catholic Church's belief in transubstantiation, the idea that bread and wine transforms during Mass into the actual body and blood of Jesus Christ.
NEWS
July 26, 2011
By David J. O'Brien Miracles do happen. Who would have believed anyone could topple Irish Catholicism? But masses of Irish Catholics no longer attend church, and those who do have lost confidence in their priests and bishops. The Irish people are finally disengaging the church from its control of education, social services, and public morality. What brutal British occupiers could not accomplish over centuries, Ireland's bishops and their Vatican masters have brought about in little more than a decade.
NEWS
May 8, 2011 | By Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
BELFAST, Northern Ireland - Northern Ireland's two major parties will return to power atop a joint Catholic-Protestant government with increased support for their policies of compromise and peacemaking, electoral returns Saturday showed. The British Protestants of the Democratic Unionists and the Irish Catholics of Sinn Fein - bitter enemies for decades but, since 2007, partners in government - strengthened their hold on the Northern Ireland Assembly, the bedrock of the province's cross-community government.
NEWS
October 10, 2010 | By Harold Jackson, Editor of the Editorial Page
Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it . That thought came to mind while reading a passage in Princeton professor Nell Irvin Painter's new book, The History of White People , in which she looks at racism as a concept that has never just been about skin color. The actual physical differences between the conqueror and the conquered, the master and slave, the enlightened and the barbarian, the haves and the have-nots, even between those considered white and black were often practically invisible.
NEWS
September 29, 2005 | By Bernadette McKenzie Kutufaris
Like many Catholics in the Philadelphia area, I felt a stream of mixed emotions last week when Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham released the grand jury report detailing the sexual abuse of many children by priests from the archdiocese. I hastily found the documents online and read through them, afraid of what and whom I would find in the 400 pages. It was to my great dismay that I found a handful of priests listed that I did indeed know. I was even further dismayed when reading about the alleged actions of the retired cardinal.
NEWS
January 24, 2004 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She is convinced that war is outdated, and love can conquer all. She thinks American foreign policy is appalling, and finds this country's reliance on guns to exact justice equally abhorent. And she entreated those gathered in a classroom at Rutgers University-Camden yesterday to do something about it. M?iread Corrigan Maguire has some strong opinions, ones often not embraced by the world around her. But the Nobel peace laureate delivered them unflinchingly yesterday with a smile and a twinkle in her eye, and an unrelenting optimism that "the human family" could overcome all differences.
SPORTS
November 5, 2003 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden Catholic has been No. 1 all season in The Inquirer's South Jersey rankings, but the Irish could be seeded second in the Parochial 3 playoffs. In power ratings released yesterday by the NJSIAA, Camden Catholic (8-0) was first in Parochial 3 with a rating of 82. Even though St. Joseph Montvale trails Camden Catholic by 11 points, the Green Knights have one more game before the cutoff, against Group 4 Clifton (5-2). If Montvale wins, it would receive 13 points, going two ahead of Camden Catholic, which means bonus points would determine the winner.
SPORTS
March 23, 2001 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Due to production difficulties, this story did not appear in yesterday's edition.PISCATAWAY, N.J. - Throughout a dream season in which the Camden Catholic boys' basketball team won its first state title in 59 years, the Irish have looked efficient and their play has seemed effortless. That was before meeting up Wednesday night with St. Anthony, which accomplished what many had deemed impossible: It made the Irish look more than a step slow. With unyielding defensive intensity that made every pass over halfcourt a tormenting exercise, St. Anthony put the clamps on Camden Catholic and defeated the Irish, 62-42, in Wednesday night's Tournament of Champions semifinals at Rutgers' Louis Brown Athletic Center.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the notable Irish American figures who emerged from this region in the early 20th century was Archbishop Thomas Francis Kennedy of Conshohocken. His work during this period helped form a strong bond between the Catholic Church in Rome and the Catholic community in the United States. At the time of Kennedy's birth in 1858, the Irish were the largest Catholic group in the Philadelphia area, according to an account by local historian Edward Hocker found in the library of the Historical Society of Montgomery County.
NEWS
November 12, 1999 | BY CLETUS MCBRIDE
It seems the story of the Irish famine is getting short shrift in Philadelphia schools. According to Bob Gessler, past president of Division 87 and Philadelphia County board president of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the mid-19th-century famine in Ireland merits only about one page, maybe less, in textbooks. To Irish-Americans, that should not be acceptable. As with any factor causing or affecting great migrations in history, such as the Holocaust and the slave trade, the famine tragedy should be told in its entirety.
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