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Irish Music

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NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By Ann Kolson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Mick Moloney was a boy growing up in Ireland's County Limerick, he would watch for hours as the three blind Dunne brothers played music outside a church. No one knew their first names. "We called them the 'three blind mice,"' Moloney, now 47, remembers. He was especially fascinated by the one who played banjo - not with a pick but a thimble. Such tales of his homeland both enliven and illuminate Moloney's life - and his life's work. He, too, became a banjo player (albeit without the thimble)
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The Circlewood Coffee House will continue its series of folk-music performances with an April 19 concert of Irish music by the Wood's Tea Company, starting at 8 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the Unitarian Church of Cherry Hill on 401 N. Kings Highway. The Coffee House is "going on its second year" of presenting folk-music shows, said Laurie McCarthy Bates, who does publicity for the all-volunteer group. "We're not trying to make a profit," although group members wouldn't mind if they did, Bates said.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By John Loughran, Special to The Inquirer
The songs that many Americans may be singing today in celebration of St. Patrick's Day might be more Irish-American than Irish, say several local musicians who themselves play different varieties of Irish music. "It's certainly Irish-American," Seamus Egan of Lansdowne said of the songs and music often associated with St. Patrick's Day. "It promotes a very romantic view of Ireland. It's not what people would be playing a hundred years ago sitting around the fire," said Egan, who plays the Uilleann pipes, flute, banjo, mandolin and tin whistle with his sisters and with the band The Green Fields of America.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
When Dennis Gormley and Kathy DeAngelo pick up a tin whistle and fiddle, it's easier to believe their house is settled in the rocky fields of Connemara than on a development street a short walk from the Echelon Mall. Gormley and DeAngelo have been husband and wife since 1979 and McDermott's Handy, an Irish-music playing duo, since 1978, four years after they started playing together off and on. As McDermott's Handy, the couple perform a wide range of Irish folk music at fairs, festivals, local libraries, coffeehouses, private functions and other locations.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1999 | By Terry Conway, FOR THE INQUIRER
On the one hand, it's a long journey from the Lobby Bar in Cork, Ireland, to O'Friel's Irish Pub here. On the other, it's really not. At a show sponsored by the Green Willow Folk Club on a recent Monday evening, audience members packed the pub's 130-seat listening room, quaffing pints of Guinness stout and Harp lager while savoring the spirited sound of Nomos, a nine-year-old quartet that plays its hometown Lobby Bar when it's not touring....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ruben Blades is known as one of the greatest living salseros - he's won four Grammys - but he's always been about more than that. He has run for president of his native Panama and has a master's degree in international law from Harvard. He has acted in a dozen films and has recorded an album in English (one of his few missteps, actually). Indeed, he's one of the most socially conscious, thought-provoking lyricists in the Latin music world. And he has explored music that has taken him in directions far from the Afro-Latin sounds that made him an international star.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
AUDUBON The weekly Irish music session at the Tree House in Audubon always begins with "Merrily Kissed the Quaker's Wife," a tune that's sufficiently merry to chase the chill away, even during a winter like this one. A session, from the Gaelic seisiún, is a regularly scheduled but otherwise informal live performance, often in a pub; at the coffee house on Merchant Street, the youngest players are teenagers, the oldest is an octogenarian, and newcomers...
TRAVEL
April 1, 2012 | By Art Sands, For The Inquirer
We travel for many reasons, sometimes for a song. That's what took me in May to a hillside overlooking a country cottage near Armagh, Northern Ireland. Over hay wagon-wide farm roads, I tooled for hours in a little rental car on an improbable ride to the ancestral home of a musical hero, Tommy Makem. He died in 2007 and may not be Ireland's top dog in music anymore, or even remembered in America. But the Irish still call him "the godfather of Irish music. " And Makem was once so hot in America that at the 1961 Newport Folk Festival, they named him the most promising newcomer on the American folk scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Leo Moran of Ireland's Saw Doctors says it happens every year right around this time: He'll run into a slew of fellow Irish musicians at the airport, all heading across the pond to play St. Patrick's Day gigs. "It's become such a tradition for so many Irish musicians," Moran said by phone from Ireland. "The States make more of St. Patrick's Day than anywhere else in the world, so you see each other at the airport, all carrying our instrument cases. " Indeed, there will be no shortage of Celtic music - originating from Ireland, Canada, and even the United States - on area stages over the next couple of weeks.
NEWS
August 20, 2006 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Ely family take part next weekend in the All-Ireland Music Festival, winning a medal won't be the point. It will be all about the music - and the tradition. "We're going for the fun of it, to hear the music and meet other musicians," Marie Ely said. "Competing is not our mind-set. " Ely, her daughter, Katie, and her son, Josh, play traditional Irish music on traditional Irish instruments. Each qualified for the competition in Ireland by winning medals at the Mid-Atlantic Fleadh (pronounced flay)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Sharon Corr, of the Irish band the Corrs, appreciates the way Americans celebrate St. Patrick's Day. "It's a huge celebration, and I don't really believe in under-doing anything. If you're going to do something, do it big, and that's what you guys do, which I think is really, really great. We [Irish] do have that great heritage of great art, great music, so it's good to celebrate. " Saturday night offers a convergence of opportunities to explore Irish music of several shades of green, from Corr's own debut solo appearance at World Cafe Live to the Philly-based Irish American band Solas at Wilmington's Grand Opera House to Celtic Nights' celebration of traditional step-dancing and music at the Annenberg.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
AUDUBON The weekly Irish music session at the Tree House in Audubon always begins with "Merrily Kissed the Quaker's Wife," a tune that's sufficiently merry to chase the chill away, even during a winter like this one. A session, from the Gaelic seisiún, is a regularly scheduled but otherwise informal live performance, often in a pub; at the coffee house on Merchant Street, the youngest players are teenagers, the oldest is an octogenarian, and newcomers...
FOOD
March 15, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Irish celebrity chef Clodagh McKenna has fond memories of celebrating St. Patrick's Day while she was growing up in County Cork. "We would be looking forward to it for weeks," she said in a phone interview from Dublin. "In school, we would be studying the history of Ireland, making Irish flags, then on the day before, we would make brooches with fresh shamrocks, blessed by the priest, and tied with a white ribbon," she said. On St. Patrick's Day, she and her sisters would put on their best dresses for Mass with the family.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Leo Moran of Ireland's Saw Doctors says it happens every year right around this time: He'll run into a slew of fellow Irish musicians at the airport, all heading across the pond to play St. Patrick's Day gigs. "It's become such a tradition for so many Irish musicians," Moran said by phone from Ireland. "The States make more of St. Patrick's Day than anywhere else in the world, so you see each other at the airport, all carrying our instrument cases. " Indeed, there will be no shortage of Celtic music - originating from Ireland, Canada, and even the United States - on area stages over the next couple of weeks.
TRAVEL
April 1, 2012 | By Art Sands, For The Inquirer
We travel for many reasons, sometimes for a song. That's what took me in May to a hillside overlooking a country cottage near Armagh, Northern Ireland. Over hay wagon-wide farm roads, I tooled for hours in a little rental car on an improbable ride to the ancestral home of a musical hero, Tommy Makem. He died in 2007 and may not be Ireland's top dog in music anymore, or even remembered in America. But the Irish still call him "the godfather of Irish music. " And Makem was once so hot in America that at the 1961 Newport Folk Festival, they named him the most promising newcomer on the American folk scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'It's all related," says Paddy Moloney. He's cofounder and heart of the Chieftains, the iconic - heck, atavistic - Irish band that jigs through town for a céilidh on Friday at the Kimmel Center. It's their 50th anniversary world tour, and in that half-century, they have dedicated themselves to playing with and for everyone and anyone around the world, discovering roots with many different kinds of music, from Dublin to Philadelphia to Africa to Oaxaca to China and back round.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
A small piece of Lower Bucks County's popular culture was formally lost to nature Wednesday. The Valley Stream Inn, a popular restaurant known for its crab cakes, Sunday brunch, and scenic views of the Neshaminy Creek, now is set for demolition. The county commissioners approved the $230,000 purchase with federal funds to preserve the 3.5-acre low-lying tract as open space. The landmark, built in 1956, got flooded several times over the years but always reopened. It closed for good in September, after Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee flushed the creek over its banks twice in two weeks, said Bill Mitchell, executive director of the Department of Parks and Recreation.
NEWS
September 28, 2010
Harry R. Kerr Jr., 65, of Coatesville, a salesman for several companies, coach, and college administrator, died of heart failure Thursday, Sept. 23, at home. Mr. Kerr played football and basketball for Sharon Hill High School and was on the football and basketball teams while attending the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and Millersville University. From 1968 to 1971, he served in the Army and was an intelligence specialist at Fort Hood in Texas. After his discharge, he earned a bachelor's degree in secondary education and a master's degree in English from West Chester University.
NEWS
May 14, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas M. Moffit, 79, of Southwest Philadelphia, an accordionist, a bandleader, and host of an Irish music radio program, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Tuesday, May 11, at Mercy Philadelphia Hospital. For more than 30 years until retiring three years ago, Mr. Moffit led the Tommy Moffit Band, performing at Irish festivals and in clubs. On Sundays from 1974 to 2006, he hosted an Irish hour on WTMR-AM (800). He played traditional Irish music and shared information about events in the Irish community.
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