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NEWS
June 1, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Dominic Quinn, the colorful WWDB-FM talk-radio host who was as deft with the verbal broadsword as he was with the microphone, died yesterday at his home in Wayne. He was 73. WWDB general manager Dan Sullivan described Quinn as a man who enjoyed his work and the friendships he made in and out of the studio. Quinn began his radio career in 1948. Quinn joined WWDB (96.5 FM) in 1976, leaving the station in 1990, only to return a year later. Before joining WWDB, he hosted a radio program on WCAU-AM.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anne Anderson , Ireland's ambassador to the United States, nodded to this year's honorees at Philadelphia's Irish American Business Chamber and Network luncheon - Gregory McStravick , president of SAP U.S. ; Ann Claffey Baiada , director of Bayada Home Health Care , and Denis O'Brien , CEO of Exelon Utilities , who can trace their Irish ancestors, county and parish - and made this plea: Let another wave of immigrants help...
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Anne Fahy, Special to The Inquirer
Margaret Mary Kirby Houlihan, who came to America from Ireland in 1920 and worked as a housekeeper in New York, died Aug. 24 at her home in Havertown. She was 88. Reared in a convent school in County Limerick, Mrs. Houlihan came to America when she was 18, joining her aunt, a cook for a family in New York. Shortly thereafter she met her late husband, Joseph T. Houlihan, who was also from Limerick. "She didn't want to come," said her son John. "But times were hard. " The couple, who moved with John to Ardmore in 1963, were married on New Years Day 1923.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Karie Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The second oldest parade in the country will make its 243d march in Philadelphia on Sunday in celebration of St. Patrick's Day, a week ahead of time. The parade has been a tradition since 1771 and typically occurs on St. Patrick's Day, March 17, except when the holiday falls on a Sunday, said Bob Gessler, president of the St. Patrick's Day Observance Association. About 20,000 people will march from 16th Street and JFK Boulevard at 12 p.m. down the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in this year's parade, including 180 groups and organizations such as the D.C. Fire Department Emerald Society Pipes and Drums, Timoney Irish Dancers, Cairdeas Irish Brigade, Celtic Flame School of Irish Dance, Emerald Isle Academy of Irish Dance, and Philadelphia Emerald Society Pipe Band.
NEWS
March 15, 2012
When someone keeps commiting offensive acts, but apologizes afterward each time, is he really sorry? That question arises in the case of Philadelphia-based Urban Outfitters, which again is selling apparel that offends a particular segment of American society. This time, again, it's Irish Americans, who are stereotypically depicted on T-shirts and other items Urban Outfitters hopes to sell to St. Patrick's Day revelers. It's a shame that an event that for the better part of 1,000 years was observed solely as a religious holiday that began in Ireland has become for too many people little more that an excuse for bawdy behavior.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | By Tom Foley
In 1916, William Butler Yeats wrote of his Ireland: Too long a sacrifice Can make a stone of the heart. O, when may it suffice? The partition of Ireland, civil war, almost 30 years of this most recent rendition of "the troubles" - indeed, when may it suffice? The ledger for this most recent cycle: almost 3,000 dead and more than 29,000 seriously hurt. In the United States, the equivalent would be 519,000 deaths and more than 5 million serious injuries - just about 10 times our losses in Vietnam.
NEWS
August 2, 1996 | BY JACK McKINNEY
I haven't wrapped a column around anything from my mailbox since I reduced my number of at-bats for this team. I'll make an exception today, though, because it concerns an injustice done to Olympic runner Sonia O'Sullivan of Ireland, who's had enough grief lately. In reporting two weeks ago that the privilege of carrying Ireland's flag in opening ceremonies had gone to boxer Francis Barrett, a member of that nation's socially spurned so-called traveling community, I put a knock on O'Sullivan for earlier turning down the honor.
NEWS
June 29, 1995 | By Andrew M. Greeley
Without almost anyone noticing, Ireland is becoming a prosperous country. In fact, domestic demand, which is part of the rapid growth rate (highest in Europe), is becoming so strong that inflation (lowest in Europe) might loom on the horizon. "Domestic demand" means that many people here have enough money to buy more than they did in the past. Not everyone has such money, of course, and the Irish unemployment rate is still between 13 and 14 percent. But the standard of living is improving rapdily.
NEWS
August 8, 1995 | BY DAVE BARRY
I recently spent a week in Ireland, and I can honestly say that I have never been to any place in the world where it is so easy to partake of the local culture, by which I mean beer. Ireland also contains history, nice people, enormous quantities of scenery and a rich cultural heritage, including (more on this later) Elvis. Geographically, Ireland is a medium-sized rural island that is slowly but steadily being consumed by sheep. It consists mostly of scenic pastures occasionally interrupted by quaint towns with names such as (these are actual Irish town names)
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BUSINESS
February 22, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anne Anderson , Ireland's ambassador to the United States, nodded to this year's honorees at Philadelphia's Irish American Business Chamber and Network luncheon - Gregory McStravick , president of SAP U.S. ; Ann Claffey Baiada , director of Bayada Home Health Care , and Denis O'Brien , CEO of Exelon Utilities , who can trace their Irish ancestors, county and parish - and made this plea: Let another wave of immigrants help...
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Karie Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
The second oldest parade in the country will make its 243d march in Philadelphia on Sunday in celebration of St. Patrick's Day, a week ahead of time. The parade has been a tradition since 1771 and typically occurs on St. Patrick's Day, March 17, except when the holiday falls on a Sunday, said Bob Gessler, president of the St. Patrick's Day Observance Association. About 20,000 people will march from 16th Street and JFK Boulevard at 12 p.m. down the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in this year's parade, including 180 groups and organizations such as the D.C. Fire Department Emerald Society Pipes and Drums, Timoney Irish Dancers, Cairdeas Irish Brigade, Celtic Flame School of Irish Dance, Emerald Isle Academy of Irish Dance, and Philadelphia Emerald Society Pipe Band.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
ON ST. Patrick's Day, nearly every bar pours Guinness and cloaks itself in shamrocks. But is that enough to be an Irish pub? This is no matter for idle pondering while the foam drops from your stout. In fact, it was the central theme of the first American conference of Irish Pubs Global, held in Center City last spring. That's right, Irish pubs now have their own industry association, and why not? Scribble these figures on the back of your beer coaster: $2 million a year in revenues for an average Irish pub, multiplied by 1,200 full-blown Irish pubs in America.
NEWS
March 15, 2012
When someone keeps commiting offensive acts, but apologizes afterward each time, is he really sorry? That question arises in the case of Philadelphia-based Urban Outfitters, which again is selling apparel that offends a particular segment of American society. This time, again, it's Irish Americans, who are stereotypically depicted on T-shirts and other items Urban Outfitters hopes to sell to St. Patrick's Day revelers. It's a shame that an event that for the better part of 1,000 years was observed solely as a religious holiday that began in Ireland has become for too many people little more that an excuse for bawdy behavior.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By DAVID PLOTZ
TODAY WE raise a glass of warm green beer to a fine fellow, the Irishman who didn't rid the land of snakes, didn't compare the Trinity to the shamrock and wasn't even Irish. St. Patrick, who died 1,518, 1,550 or 1,551 years ago today - depending on which unreliable source you want to believe - has been adorned with centuries of Irish blarney. Innumerable folk tales recount how he faced down kings, negotiated with God, tricked and slaughtered Ireland's reptiles. The facts about St. Patrick are few. Most derive from the two documents he probably wrote, the autobiographical "Confession" and the indignant "Letter to a slave-taking marauder named Coroticus.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | By Tom Foley
In 1916, William Butler Yeats wrote of his Ireland: Too long a sacrifice Can make a stone of the heart. O, when may it suffice? The partition of Ireland, civil war, almost 30 years of this most recent rendition of "the troubles" - indeed, when may it suffice? The ledger for this most recent cycle: almost 3,000 dead and more than 29,000 seriously hurt. In the United States, the equivalent would be 519,000 deaths and more than 5 million serious injuries - just about 10 times our losses in Vietnam.
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Shamrocks, shillelaghs and shenanigans. These often come to mind when speaking of the Irish and particularly the celebration of St. Patrick's Day in America. Jim Murphy, associate professor of English and director of the Irish Studies program at Villanova University, has spent his career dispelling myths and destroying stereotypes by emphasizing the great wealth of history and culture of the Irish people. "Irish culture goes beyond the green-beer season," Murphy said. "There's a lot of silliness and cliches about St. Patrick and a lot of people get all their history from pub sessions.
NEWS
August 2, 1996 | BY JACK McKINNEY
I haven't wrapped a column around anything from my mailbox since I reduced my number of at-bats for this team. I'll make an exception today, though, because it concerns an injustice done to Olympic runner Sonia O'Sullivan of Ireland, who's had enough grief lately. In reporting two weeks ago that the privilege of carrying Ireland's flag in opening ceremonies had gone to boxer Francis Barrett, a member of that nation's socially spurned so-called traveling community, I put a knock on O'Sullivan for earlier turning down the honor.
NEWS
June 1, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Dominic Quinn, the colorful WWDB-FM talk-radio host who was as deft with the verbal broadsword as he was with the microphone, died yesterday at his home in Wayne. He was 73. WWDB general manager Dan Sullivan described Quinn as a man who enjoyed his work and the friendships he made in and out of the studio. Quinn began his radio career in 1948. Quinn joined WWDB (96.5 FM) in 1976, leaving the station in 1990, only to return a year later. Before joining WWDB, he hosted a radio program on WCAU-AM.
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