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NEWS
August 18, 1998
It made no sense. Evil often doesn't. A bomb believed set by dissident Catholics went off in Omagh, Northern Ireland - a mostly Catholic town - killing mostly Catholics. Six children died. The explosion blew the legs off a pregnant woman. Hundreds were hurt, with 28 dead in all, ghastly slaughters on the altar of a misguided creed. The irony is that the Omagh blast may signal the end of the terrorist era in Ireland, not its resurgence. True, this was the worst such bombing in Northern Ireland in the three decades since the Troubles began.
NEWS
December 10, 1986
Your Nov. 15 article about the Anglo-Irish agreement related incidents of unionist violence on the agreement's first birthday. It is a shame your article did not discuss the achievements of the agreement. The chief beneficiaries of the agreement were supposed to be the nationalist (mostly Catholic) people of the six counties. They were told when the agreement was signed that they no longer would be second-class citizens. Meetings were held and, as stated in the agreement, Irish representatives were allowed to express their "views and proposals.
NEWS
March 12, 2011 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunday will be marked by two parades in Philadelphia, one celebrating St. Patrick's Day, another as part of a Buddhist celebration in Chinatown. The St. Patrick's parade will begin at 11:30 a.m. just west of 16th Street on JFK Boulevard and wind through Center City. The procession will head east on JFK to 16th, then north on 16th to the Parkway. It then will go northwest to the north side of Eakins Oval, where there will be a reviewing stand. To accommodate the parade, the following streets will be closed to motor-vehicle traffic: JFK Boulevard between 16th and 20th Street from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; 16th from Market Street to the Parkway from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; the Parkway from 16th to Eakins Oval from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Additional police will be assigned to the area to expedite vehicle and pedestrian traffic.
NEWS
September 17, 1990
STOP MURDERING THE IRISH The Irish have voted 3 percent for Sinn Fein (political wing of the Irish Republican Army) in every single general election, so how concerned are the Irish with the IRA? Most Irish think of them as murderers, thugs and mafiosi, and that's what they are. And so are the UVF (Ulster Volunteer Force). And what they do is murder Irish people. And every time an Irish-American is laboring under the illusion that "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" is a traditional Irish song and contributes another dollar to Noraid, he's killing another Irishman.
NEWS
August 27, 1986
Regarding your Aug. 17 editorial "Free Nelson R. Mandela, U.S. leaders must insist," I agree that Mr. Mandela should be freed. It would be rather hypocritical, however, for United States leaders to take such action before they insist that Joseph P. Doherty be freed. Mr. Mandela and Mr. Doherty have many things in common. First, they are both freedom fighters. Mr. Doherty, in fact, has been deemed by a U.S. district judge to be a freedom fighter and a "classic case of the political defense exception.
NEWS
March 14, 1986 | By JUAN GONZALEZ, Daily News Staff Writer
It seemed like an innocuous enough resolution, one of the many that slip through City Council at nearly every session, commemorating somebody or other for doing good works. But this one stirred a donnybrook that might have been more appropriate to a Dublin pub than the chambers of the city's legislative body. Councilwoman Joan Specter, Republican minority leader, proposed a resolution commemorating the locally based architectural firm of Venturi, Rauch and Scott Brown for having won an international competition to do the design work for a new wing of Britain's National Gallery of Art. Did somebody say Britain?
NEWS
May 15, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Irish parliament, facing fierce opposition from the Roman Catholic Church, yesterday began debating a bill aimed at legalizing divorce, now banned under the Irish Constitution. In opening the debate, Justice Minister Alan Dukes described the proposal as one of the most important to come before the Irish people in recent years. Ireland and Malta are the only countries in Europe that ban divorce. Advocates of the right to divorce in Ireland estimate that 35,000 married couples live apart in the country.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer , Daily News Staff Writer
More than 1 million Irish people dead. Another million-and-a-half forced to flee their homeland. It's the story of the Great Irish Potato Famine of 150 years ago. That story will be told through a $2 million Irish Memorial, which will grace the gateway to the Penn's Landing development. So far, about $1 million has been raised from Irish societies, foundations and businesses, which didn't want to be identified, according to Jim Coyne, who's leading the memorial effort.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By JOAN L. KRAJEWSKI
DURING the Great Famine of the 1840s, thousands of Irish fled their homeland for America and a chance at a better life. They arrived in Boston, New York and Philadelphia and were met with scorn and discrimination. People who lived off the land with miles and miles of sky were now packed into filthy rooming houses. With few skills and not much schooling, 70 percent wound up in domestic servitude - doing housework for the same people who looked down on them with such disdain. The Irish would take any job for any wage because they refused to let their families starve.
NEWS
March 20, 2004
Kindness of a stranger On March 6, my wife and I and another visiting couple were walking to the Philadelphia Museum of Art from our hotel. Along the way, the heavens opened. In a very few minutes we were all soaked to the bone, and we still had a half-mile or more to go to get to the museum. A tan or gray Honda with Pennsylvania plates stopped at the curb near us. A man got out and rushed toward us with an umbrella. He gave it to me saying, "You look like you could use this.
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