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Irish People

SPORTS
July 16, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's official. Penn State will open the 2014 season against Central Florida in Dublin, Ireland. The formal announcement came Sunday in Dublin. The Nittany Lions will play the first international game in their 127-year football history on Aug. 30, 2014, against the Knights at the city's Croke Park, the headquarters of Ireland's Gaelic Athletic Association. Penn State athletic director Dave Joyner and UCF coach George O'Leary were in Ireland for the announcement at halftime of the Leinster Senior Football Championship final between Dublin and Meath.
NEWS
March 10, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the bodies of the 57 Irish immigrants were dumped into a mass grave in 1832, it was a secret, perhaps meant to shroud a violent end. But 180 years later, in a ceremony to commemorate the railroad workers' deaths, there was pomp and fanfare. Bagpipes, a procession, and a regal, 10-foot high Celtic cross grave marker were part of a funeral service Friday meant to give five of the 57 the proper burial they never had. The observance at West Laurel Hill Cemetery in Bala Cynwyd was the culmination of a 10-year research project, known as Duffy's Cut, to determine the fate of the workers who stepped off a boat from Ireland in June 1832 and were dead eight weeks later.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | By Mohamed El-Bendary
Peace in Northern Ireland was given a push forward Saturday, when the pro-British Ulster Unionists agreed to allow Sinn Fein, the political ally of the Irish Republican Army, to take a seat in a new power-sharing executive this week. Brokered by former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell, the extraordinary agreement allows for a Protestant-Catholic government to take over the administration of Northern Ireland. I'm going to take the stance of the guarded optimist in this matter. The Unionist vote could indeed lead to the end of the province's three decades of conflict.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | By Kevin Donegan
Amid unresolved disputes over policing, flags and weapons decommissioning, Northern Ireland's delicate and oft-suspended peace process resumed last week. The task - some call it a burden - of governing the province has been handed back from London to Belfast, to a power-sharing government of Unionists who favor continued political union with Britain and nationalists who favor unity with Ireland. Political leaders there still find it difficult to look one another in the eye, let alone advance political and social reform for a beleaguered Northern Irish people.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By JOHN HUME
The major developments that have been taking place in Europe, the creation of the single market and now the drive toward European political union, all have profound implications for relations within Ireland, relations between Ireland and Britain and for what has become known as the "Irish problem," which today disfigures the north of Ireland. Fifty years ago World War II was in progress. The bitterness between European peoples had exploded once again into conflict and war. Difference was once again pushed to the point of division and the terrible price in human terms was again being paid.
NEWS
October 31, 1988 | By JANE EISNER
The good citizens of Philadelphia may not be aware of this; it did not make headlines last week and won't do a thing to budge the city treasury. But there's a new, 18th member of City Council. An honorary member, that is - with no city-owned car, no office paneled with cherry wood. (No great pressure to figure out how to balance the city budget, either.) Perhaps because he is not from around here, Ben Briscoe is proud of his new membership. He'll show you the beautifully lettered declaration without prompting.
NEWS
March 30, 1987 | By Herm L. Rogul, Special to The Inquirer
Steve Nesmith is a walking, talking, jump-shooting commercial for Big Brothers of America. Nesmith, a former Malvern Prep and American University basketball star, is now in Ireland, playing professionally for Dawn Milk of the (Irish) National League. His numbers make him sound like the Irish version of Larry Bird: 30 points and 12 rebounds per game. Last year, as a rookie for the Tower Hamlets in London, he scored a Jordanesque 35 points a game. But basketball is just one part of this remarkable story.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By JOAN L. KRAJEWSKI
DURING the Great Famine of the 1840s, thousands of Irish fled their homeland for America and a chance at a better life. They arrived in Boston, New York and Philadelphia and were met with scorn and discrimination. People who lived off the land with miles and miles of sky were now packed into filthy rooming houses. With few skills and not much schooling, 70 percent wound up in domestic servitude - doing housework for the same people who looked down on them with such disdain. The Irish would take any job for any wage because they refused to let their families starve.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Today in the Republic of Ireland, 75 years after the Easter Rising of 1916 and 25 years after the 50th anniversary of the Rising was lavishly celebrated, the country's romance with its violent tradition has faded. In its place is uncertainty about the nation's relationship to its past and ambivalence about how or whether a united Ireland can be achieved. In 1966, the largest military parade the country ever staged marched past the steps of Dublin's General Post Office, where the rebels declared a Republic on Easter Monday in 1916.
NEWS
January 9, 1986
FALSE IMPRESSION GIVEN IN ARTICLE ABOUT TUTU TRIBUTE We were extremely outraged by an article by Kevin Haney Dec. 16, which improperly linked the upcoming fundraising dinner for South African Bishop Desmond Tutu with the alleged investors battle involving the chairperson of one of the dinner's sponsoring groups. There is no link between the dinner for Tutu and Joe Miller's legal problems. The article creates the impression that Miller, a peace activist and chairperson of the Philadelphia Committee for A Sane Nuclear Policy, swindled investors, and implies he should not be affiliated with the Tutu dinner.
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