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Irish People

NEWS
March 17, 1996 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For most, St. Patrick's Day is a once-a-year whirlwind of green neon shamrocks, green bagels and green beer. And if you drink enough of that beer, you may even kiss the stranger next to you simply because she is wearing a button that tells you to: "I'm Irish. " But for some merchants in South Jersey, selling Irish is a serious, year-round occupation. Whether you're in the market for a real Irish woolen cape, an ancient Celtic spell to cast upon your lover, or even an authentic Irish name, you needn't travel much farther than County Camden.
NEWS
August 8, 1995 | BY DAVE BARRY
I recently spent a week in Ireland, and I can honestly say that I have never been to any place in the world where it is so easy to partake of the local culture, by which I mean beer. Ireland also contains history, nice people, enormous quantities of scenery and a rich cultural heritage, including (more on this later) Elvis. Geographically, Ireland is a medium-sized rural island that is slowly but steadily being consumed by sheep. It consists mostly of scenic pastures occasionally interrupted by quaint towns with names such as (these are actual Irish town names)
NEWS
June 29, 1995 | By Andrew M. Greeley
Without almost anyone noticing, Ireland is becoming a prosperous country. In fact, domestic demand, which is part of the rapid growth rate (highest in Europe), is becoming so strong that inflation (lowest in Europe) might loom on the horizon. "Domestic demand" means that many people here have enough money to buy more than they did in the past. Not everyone has such money, of course, and the Irish unemployment rate is still between 13 and 14 percent. But the standard of living is improving rapdily.
NEWS
June 1, 1991
LONG KESH REMEMBERED Maggie Thatcher, butcher of Long Kesh, receives the Freedom Medal from President Bush. The Queen of England is welcomed with open arms by Bush and Congress. All on the 10th anniversary of the deaths of 10 young Irish patriots, dying on hunger strike for Irish freedom. The curtain is not down. At no time in the history of mankind did a tyrant succeed in putting an end to the fight for freedom by executing its fighters. The curtain is not down. The murder of the 10 hunger strikers in Long Kesh Concentration Camp, Northern Ireland, is but one of the pages of Irish history.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Anne Fahy, Special to The Inquirer
Margaret Mary Kirby Houlihan, who came to America from Ireland in 1920 and worked as a housekeeper in New York, died Aug. 24 at her home in Havertown. She was 88. Reared in a convent school in County Limerick, Mrs. Houlihan came to America when she was 18, joining her aunt, a cook for a family in New York. Shortly thereafter she met her late husband, Joseph T. Houlihan, who was also from Limerick. "She didn't want to come," said her son John. "But times were hard. " The couple, who moved with John to Ardmore in 1963, were married on New Years Day 1923.
NEWS
September 13, 1986
THE HEGINS PIGEON SHOOT I have just witnessd the single most gruesome violent event taking place in Pennsylvania. For no real reason, 7,000 pigeons were ruthlessly killed as a so-called sporting event. The pigeons are released from the very small cages, and as they attempt to rise in flight, they are shot to death by men who pay $60 each for the pleasure of killing. When enough dead birds litter the lawn, pre-teen children run on the killing fields to collect the dead, carrying the corpses to trash cans with the same concern with which one throws dirty socks into the laundry.
NEWS
July 14, 1986 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Philadelphia, Here I Come! at the Villanova Summer Theater is not just a play about a young Irishman preparing to immigrate to Philadelphia in the early 1960s. Young Gar O'Donnell's doubts, fears and high hopes have been shared in some way by many other emigrants about to leave their native lands. "The play has a lot to say about many people who emigrated, including the Irish, Italians (and other Europeans)," said Paul Moore, 28, a black-haired, blue-eyed native of Ireland who is making a return visit after two years to Villanova this summer as a guest director from Dublin's Abbey Theater, the National Theater of the Republic of Ireland.
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