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Irish Potato Famine

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SPORTS
October 9, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Stanford University's athletic director has apologized to local Catholic school officials angered by last weekend's football pregame and halftime shows by the university's band. Ted Leland issued a written apology to more than 30 administrators who signed a letter condemning the band's shows, performed during Saturday's Stanford-Notre Dame game. The shows featured a parody of the Irish potato famine, a mock debate between a Catholic cardinal and the devil, and referred to the Irish as "stinking drunks.
NEWS
April 11, 1995 | BY JAMES MURRAY LYNN
I was getting my 5-year-old daughter Grainne ready for school when I saw your editorial cartoon, "Why people are suddenly so interested in the Irish Potato Famine," criticizing the Republican congressional leadership's policy on poor people. The words "sudden interest" jumped at me. This so-called sudden interest, I said in dismay to Grainne, has been around for 150 years. In 1845, Ireland had 8 million people and the famine cut its population in half - 2 million died and 2 million emigrated.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sweden issued two commemoratives yesterday heralding construction of the Oresund Bridge-Tunnel that will bring the country closer to continental Europe. The project, also known as the Link, will carry four lanes of vehicular traffic and two railway tracks over and through the Baltic Sea to Denmark upon completion, scheduled for summer 2000, and will include a manmade island. A 6-krona stamp depicts an overhead view and a nondenominated stamp shows a side view of the double-deck bridge under construction.
NEWS
November 26, 1997 | BY JOHN C. BERKERY
On Sunday, Nov. 16, a somber group of Philadelphians, many of Irish descent, marched from Front and Walnut streets to Penn's Landing to memorialize the 150th anniversary of what has become known as the Great Hunger, the Irish potato famine. The famine decimated Ireland: 1 million starved to death; 1.5 million emigrated during the famine, another 1.5 million in the 20 years that followed. When the blight first struck in 1845, the Irish were in the throes of a movement, led by Daniel O'Connell, to repeal the hated 1800 Act of Union with Britain.
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
Irish eyes are smiling on a bunch o' stages this St. Patrick's Day weekend. While we couldn't possibly include every venue hosting something it calls an SPD party, we've put together this guide to the most noteworthy. If you expected the Folklife Center of International House, 3701 Chestnut St., to have a holiday-appropriate program this weekend, you're right. At 7 p.m. SATURDAY, the center presents an evening of Irish harp music featuring Clairseach (pronounced KLAR-shuk) - All-Ireland harp champion Ann Heymann and singer Charlie Heymann.
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | By Suzanne Sataline, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the lazy hour of 1 o'clock Sunday, with the parade far off in the distance and the actual holiday five days over the horizon, the folks from Norristown, sprawled on lawn chairs on the Parkway, reveled in the belief that their favorite saint deserved the honor of a long and hearty party. Months ago, the group had trooped to St. Michael's festival in Mont Clare, Montgomery County. Saturday, they lined the parade route in Bristol. Yesterday, they sipped beer and waited expectantly for the drum rolls of Kevin Walsh, the newest snare drummer with the high-stepping, maroon-skirted Norristown Ancient Order of Hibernians fife and drum corps.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Sara Lowen, Special to The Inquirer
Most of the museums here are devoted to certifiably important subjects such as American history or Asian art. Thus the snickers when the Potato Museum is mentioned. "People think it's an odd juxtaposition of words," said founder Tom Hughes. "They wonder how a museum could be devoted to potatoes. " Hughes and his wife, Meredith, welcome both skeptics and spud lovers to the museum, which is in the basement of their Capitol Hill townhouse. And if you're a fan of potatoes or of offbeat museums, you'll delight in this one, which can be completely explored in less than an hour.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Leo Moran of Ireland's Saw Doctors says it happens every year right around this time: He'll run into a slew of fellow Irish musicians at the airport, all heading across the pond to play St. Patrick's Day gigs. "It's become such a tradition for so many Irish musicians," Moran said by phone from Ireland. "The States make more of St. Patrick's Day than anywhere else in the world, so you see each other at the airport, all carrying our instrument cases. " Indeed, there will be no shortage of Celtic music - originating from Ireland, Canada, and even the United States - on area stages over the next couple of weeks.
NEWS
December 30, 1997 | By Ellen Goodman
What a perfect way to end 1997: the year when apologizing meant never having to say you're sorry. All across the world, we watched leaders perform acts of contrition for things that happened long before their time. In London, Prime Minister Tony Blair, circa 1997, apologized for the Irish potato famine, circa 1845. In Washington, some members of the 105th Congress urged an apology for slavery that ended during the 38th Congress. Meanwhile those folks who were actually, personally guilty continued the current tradition of the unapologetic apology.
LIVING
April 16, 2000 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Melinda Sordino may hold her tongue through much of Speak (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $16), but she most emphatically did speak to Laurie Halse Anderson. "I woke up one night because I heard one of my kids crying, something was wrong," Anderson, author of Speak, said recently. "I checked on both of them and they were fine, they weren't crying at all. And I realized that what I had heard was a bad dream, a nightmare. I have pretty graphic nightmares and I often write them down just to kind of get them out of my system so I can go back to sleep.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Leo Moran of Ireland's Saw Doctors says it happens every year right around this time: He'll run into a slew of fellow Irish musicians at the airport, all heading across the pond to play St. Patrick's Day gigs. "It's become such a tradition for so many Irish musicians," Moran said by phone from Ireland. "The States make more of St. Patrick's Day than anywhere else in the world, so you see each other at the airport, all carrying our instrument cases. " Indeed, there will be no shortage of Celtic music - originating from Ireland, Canada, and even the United States - on area stages over the next couple of weeks.
NEWS
July 16, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A cool, wet spring has created ideal conditions in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and more than a dozen other states, most in the Northeast, for late blight, a devastating disease that threatens tomatoes and potatoes grown by farmers and home gardeners alike. Best known for causing the Irish potato famine in 1845, late blight is spread from plant-to-plant over 30 to 40 miles by millions of fungal spores sent airborne by wind and rain. Once infected, plants must be destroyed. It's a frightening thought in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, where farms produce potato and tomato crops worth about $85 million annually, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
LIVING
April 16, 2000 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Melinda Sordino may hold her tongue through much of Speak (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $16), but she most emphatically did speak to Laurie Halse Anderson. "I woke up one night because I heard one of my kids crying, something was wrong," Anderson, author of Speak, said recently. "I checked on both of them and they were fine, they weren't crying at all. And I realized that what I had heard was a bad dream, a nightmare. I have pretty graphic nightmares and I often write them down just to kind of get them out of my system so I can go back to sleep.
NEWS
December 9, 1999 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 13 voyages, the triple-masted barque Jeanie Johnston carried 2,500 desperate passengers fleeing the Irish potato famine and heading toward North America, destinies unknown. In today's happier Ireland, where incomes are rising, jobs are plentiful, and tables groan with food, the wooden-hulled Jeanie Johnston is getting ready to sail yet again. This time, it is a replica being lovingly constructed by volunteers from Ireland, Northern Ireland and the world, who are preparing it for a celebratory voyage to the United States and Canada in April.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sweden issued two commemoratives yesterday heralding construction of the Oresund Bridge-Tunnel that will bring the country closer to continental Europe. The project, also known as the Link, will carry four lanes of vehicular traffic and two railway tracks over and through the Baltic Sea to Denmark upon completion, scheduled for summer 2000, and will include a manmade island. A 6-krona stamp depicts an overhead view and a nondenominated stamp shows a side view of the double-deck bridge under construction.
NEWS
December 30, 1997 | By Ellen Goodman
What a perfect way to end 1997: the year when apologizing meant never having to say you're sorry. All across the world, we watched leaders perform acts of contrition for things that happened long before their time. In London, Prime Minister Tony Blair, circa 1997, apologized for the Irish potato famine, circa 1845. In Washington, some members of the 105th Congress urged an apology for slavery that ended during the 38th Congress. Meanwhile those folks who were actually, personally guilty continued the current tradition of the unapologetic apology.
NEWS
November 26, 1997 | BY JOHN C. BERKERY
On Sunday, Nov. 16, a somber group of Philadelphians, many of Irish descent, marched from Front and Walnut streets to Penn's Landing to memorialize the 150th anniversary of what has become known as the Great Hunger, the Irish potato famine. The famine decimated Ireland: 1 million starved to death; 1.5 million emigrated during the famine, another 1.5 million in the 20 years that followed. When the blight first struck in 1845, the Irish were in the throes of a movement, led by Daniel O'Connell, to repeal the hated 1800 Act of Union with Britain.
SPORTS
October 9, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Stanford University's athletic director has apologized to local Catholic school officials angered by last weekend's football pregame and halftime shows by the university's band. Ted Leland issued a written apology to more than 30 administrators who signed a letter condemning the band's shows, performed during Saturday's Stanford-Notre Dame game. The shows featured a parody of the Irish potato famine, a mock debate between a Catholic cardinal and the devil, and referred to the Irish as "stinking drunks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1997 | By Nick Cristiano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was 1989 at a bar in the Bronx. Black 47 was making its debut at a benefit for Irish political activist Bernadette Devlin-McAlisky. Larry Kirwan was playing guitar and programming a drum machine. Chris Byrne was wailing away on various Irish pipes and whistles. They were doing original material. It wasn't exactly "Danny Boy. " As Kirwan tells it on Black 47's Web site: "After about 15 minutes, someone roared out: 'For Christ's sakes, play an Irish song!' To which I replied: 'I'm from Ireland, I wrote the song, that makes it Irish.
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
Irish eyes are smiling on a bunch o' stages this St. Patrick's Day weekend. While we couldn't possibly include every venue hosting something it calls an SPD party, we've put together this guide to the most noteworthy. If you expected the Folklife Center of International House, 3701 Chestnut St., to have a holiday-appropriate program this weekend, you're right. At 7 p.m. SATURDAY, the center presents an evening of Irish harp music featuring Clairseach (pronounced KLAR-shuk) - All-Ireland harp champion Ann Heymann and singer Charlie Heymann.
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